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holymountain

Creating an Outdoor Patch for Woodlovers or Subs

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There's a radical bulk tek..

can't find it atm

but you grow mycelium on woodchip tea in garbage bins

and keep it all healthy with a lil salt

or something.

Anyone seen that?

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hi guys, just noticed the sticky'd thread, haven't had a chance to read through all of the replies yet, but another way to jumpstart ones secret mother patch, or even to just re-invigorate a pre-existing patch, is during the season, to pick about an ounce (or as many as your willing to part with, could be more, could be less) of fresh specimens, and blend them up into a ' mushroom slurry ' and mix this with a bucket of water, and just pour it all over the patch. this mushroom mixture will have literally millions if not billions of spores in it, and it will send the patch into overdrive next season.

if one is worried about wasting perfectly healthy shrooms, possibly one could save an endeavour of this nature for a time when they mess up drying a batch of shrooms, or they pick a batch of shrooms that have started to fall apart and rot.

this method will cover a large area of woodchips and colonize it significantly. the only problem is, this method most likely wont bear any fruits untill the next season, given that you need fresh specimens to begin with. you POSSIBLY may see some fruits if you start at the very start of the season towards the end of the season, but i would just treat this as a bonus if it does occur.

one thing to keep in mind is that you really need to pick a good habitat to innoculate in this way. you need to find a shaded area, preferably on a hill or slope of some sort, that doesn't receive full sunlight, as the patch will just dry out, and once the shrooms pin, they will dry up and not have enough water to sustain themselves.

also keep in mind that if one is innoculating a local park that is maintained by the local council, these places are usually dumped with fresh loads of woodchips at the start of the season. if this happens on a patch you've colonized previously, you may not see fruits this year, as the mycelium will be buried under the new woodchips and may or may not fruit that season.

i did this two years ago in my local patch with a bucket full of rotten shrooms and mostly water, and the next season (this year) there were literally hundreds of pins popping up!

i don't think this method is too overly wasteful, given the abundance of shrooms that are available in season. and also keeping in mind that you are metaphorically taking one step backwards and five steps forward!

also remember to tread lightly on your patches, and pick sustainably. even though the smaller ones are more potent....try to wait untill the specimens mature and have opened their veil and had a chance to drop spores. use scissors and be careful not to disturb the underground mycellium network. if one does disturb this mycelial network by accident and ends up pulling out a bit of mycelium out with the stem but, then this should be removed from the shrooms and replanted into another woodchip bed to help the spread of the mushrooms for the future !

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i'm fairly sure picking the stems out with a bit of mycelium at the bottom isn't going to severely damage the patch or anything, but just me personally, i try to do the least ammount of dammage possible to the patch.

well i guess this method is kind of wasteful, but it is a fast method of colonizing a big area. just a suggestion. it also is for the greater good in my opinion, because the shrooms are certainly put to good use for the future. if one was really wanting to be conservative, i guess they could just remove the caps, and keep the stems for themselves, seeing as the stems have no spores (assuming there any mycelium attached to the bottom has been removed).

one could colonize a wheel barrow full of suitable woodchips very fast. and then use this to spawn an unlimited ammount of colonized chips, creating a super patch where ever one pleases.

anyway just something to consider. :)

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Happenstance homegrowns-

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post-7023-0-56294100-1334187345_thumb.jp

post-7023-0-84617000-1334187320_thumb.jp

Edited by mud
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is there certain types of leaves that could ruin a grow spot? or are any leaves ok

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I do'nt think it particularly matters what type of leaves buster although realy big leaves like bannanas or something dropped on the patch at fruiting or right before might be a bit of a problem for the sheer fact of smothering pins.

Green leaves should not be used in a patch but brown leaves i think may be a good source of carbon but probly best used as a mulch to retain moisture in the patch.

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sweet cheers for the info theres just a tree that drops bulk leaves around the yard

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dosileflynn, awesome tip man

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anyone got any homegrowns they can post pictures of for this season? i was hoping to have some pics to post myself but not sure the myc is gonna fruit this season. if it doesn't, i'm going to transfer it back to some grain jars or something to ensure i've got a decent amount of spawn, and then begin the patient process of waiting out another year nurturing the myc.

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Just a question on seasonal timing. I would like to expand existing an local patch (seeing I have just had my first major find in over 10 years!) as well as establish one at home. The bucket method above appeals but for home I'm guessing something more active is needed for reliability.

I guess if you are doing sterile techniques you can keep a culture alive over summer and then establish a bed in say late March. But I don't like sterile techniques (been there, tiresome, plus I like the idea of ecosystem-connected fungi), not to mention the difficulties in starting sterile culture from wild samples... Without sterile techniques I guess you need to get it outdoors in winter or spring. And then that will mean, over summer, making sure it stays moist with regular watering and a shady location?

What I am thinking is to go with the hessian method posted above, now, with the aim of having it in a bed by August or so --- is this a reasonable plan?

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There is some great info here & I am keen to start my own patch. I just had a few questions about starting my sporn, I have collected 5 ends from some subs with mycelium attached & my plan was to put these between two bits of damp cardboard & place in the cupboard until it starts to colonize. I was then planning on adding this to a bag full of damp sawdust & pine mulch. If someone can give me some pointers I would be very grateful!

Cheers

Jox

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yeh jox roll it up in some moistcorrigated cardboard kebab style OR put em in a well draining tray of clean dirt free woordchips and keep moist OR use some microwaved/pc'd birdseed/grain in the same fashion as the woodchips. either option you can keep expanding :)

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Gawwwwjus!!

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Just using the bagged cow dung that has been composted with wood chips from a gardening store works well, add colonised rye and throw a bit of coco coir on top and keep it moist and it will pin pretty quickly at this time of year.

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Just using the bagged cow dung that has been composted with wood chips from a gardening store works well, add colonised rye and throw a bit of coco coir on top and keep it moist and it will pin pretty quickly at this time of year.

I'm brand new this forum, It's awsome so far....

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bit of success..only had em going about a month, in layered cardboard, i water them all the time.

post-4415-0-61092800-1435635161_thumb.jppost-4415-0-53951600-1435635170_thumb.jppost-4415-0-35177900-1435635179_thumb.jppost-4415-0-75323700-1435635187_thumb.jp

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^^^

What's that they're growing on? Looks like a pinecone?

(p.s. love the cardboard... we could be witnessing the genesis of the "Lightyear Buzz" strain - super subs of the future! to infinity & beyond!)

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Nice work micoz, lookin good!

I forgot this thread was even here. I made a patch last year that I am pretty sure didn't work as I've had nothing yet. It wasn't for lack of effort but for lack of research at the time.

So I try again. I have lots of spots in the garden these will be going, a couple ot friends houses and some new spots started in the wild too.

I've made some with just cardboard, some with cardboard and fine pine shavings. Some in TakeAway tubs with only pine chips and shavings, some in TA containers with soil and woodchips, and some in TA with carboard surrounded by wood shavings and chips in the hope the myc will spread from the cardboard and into the wood.

The ones in TA containers have the lids left on them but only sealed in one or two corners to allow some gas exchange but they stay nice and moist, a little spray with a water bottle every few days and they seem pretty happy.

This particular one is easily the most agressive so far. Which makes complete sense as these subs come from a place which gets very high winds and is on top of a ridge along a single line of pines. They are also always very, very short stemmed. So I have pretty high hopes for these ones. I know the cardboard is in the way in some pics of the TA containers but it has myc growing and holding it down so I didn't want to rip it up.

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And apart from one more variety I've kept pure, most have been mixed together from a number of different spots all combined in together. None are as aggressive as the other one I've kept aside and shown above.

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the mushroom must eat


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Looking good Pimento! Have you just laid all that wood down now, after most of your patches have finished flushing?

Those wood chips you are using, are they the "soft fall" playground type of pine chips that you can get at landscaping shops?

I hope so as that type of pine chips are what I have been using in my TA container mixes and what I plan to use to build my new garden beds in the coming weeks.

And BTW - I did pasteurize a bunch of my wood chips and shavings in water at 65c for a bit over an hour. But I have also done a bunch without pasteurizing. (and I doubt I'll be pasteurizing any more of the ones I do basically because fuck that, it takes too long) haha!

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My patch didn't fruit yet this winter, and I may have been a little optimistic when I spread out my colonised chips over a fair space. The myc is spreading well however, and I've been wondering if I should add more chips, or if this will postpone any chance of fruiting this winter...maybe hold off til spring and see what happens?

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nice work zed, good job keeping the strains seperate even if it is just one type, mine are just a mixture.

I'll be starting from scratch this year and ive been toying with the idea of underground watering.

just out of interest...if you were gunna build a bed from scratch and say you had approx 60cm of depth to work with, what would be the ideal make up of the soil?

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Looking good Pimento! Have you just laid all that wood down now, after most of your patches have finished flushing?

Those wood chips you are using, are they the "soft fall" playground type of pine chips that you can get at landscaping shops?

I hope so as that type of pine chips are what I have been using in my TA container mixes and what I plan to use to build my new garden beds in the coming weeks.

And BTW - I did pasteurize a bunch of my wood chips and shavings in water at 65c for a bit over an hour. But I have also done a bunch without pasteurizing. (and I doubt I'll be pasteurizing any more of the ones I do basically because fuck that, it takes too long) haha!

tis a pic of one of the patches, yes.

they are sort of aged pine chip from the local landscaping supply joint, the guy is a dick head so the other half goes there and endures idiocy whilst they are loaded.

2 scoops for $44, fills the ute.

aged white woods colonise the quickest.

yupski, imo pasteurising is only really necessary if your transferring from grain to wood, just incase their are contams in the wood.

patch didn't fruit yet this winter, and I may have been a little optimistic when I spread out my colonised chips over a fair space. The myc is spreading well however, and I've been wondering if I should add more chips, or if this will postpone any chance of fruiting this winter...maybe hold off til spring and see what happens?

sometimes i'll get a pilot shroom the first year in a new patch, usually takes 2-3 years for the mycelium to colonise enough substrate to enable the organism to produce a good flush.

maybe add chips to half the patch, just in case.

nice work zed, good job keeping the strains seperate even if it is just one type, mine are just a mixture.

I'll be starting from scratch this year and ive been toying with the idea of underground watering.

just out of interest...if you were gunna build a bed from scratch and say you had approx 60cm of depth to work with, what would be the ideal make up of the soil?

I've kept a lot of the phenotypes separate, makes for some nice viewing come autumn.

have found that if a few types of sub mycelium are mixed in one taco they can hold their own and flush in unison, intermingled phenotypes,.

don't know bout the soil bit man?

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