132 posts in this topic

i really like your ideas but had run out of presses on the like button to click :3 

 

only trouble is I've always been ripped off and punished harshly for tryna show goodhearted kindness to my fellow peeps, almost murdered 3 times , and turned on by those who I've saved ... , virtually all those witnessing the hard times later showed they were also just opportunists pedaling false brother and sisterhood until their moment to strike..

 

if there was a common law prevailing, would it mean I could lawfully defend myself with lethal force whenever necessary? (so as not to have to die just to uphold a silly rule that some ivory tower twat commands)

 

when you say I believe if there is no victim then there is no crime , be aware that it is susceptible also to corruption since if there is no victim (left to tell) ,... doesn't mean they havent been murdered and 'disappeared'.. and if nobody knew... then some cunt is likely to say no crime here look... with subtitles reading 'dead peeps dont tell tales'

 

this is the kind of reason why i also lost faith in the fascade too ,

it's like a big pile of dogshit moulded into a fancy wedding cake and airbrushed...

 

the real thing is that using and growing plants for personal health isn't a crime in the first place ,

it's a natural human thing to do , and to oppress the people and extort yet further power is worthy of rotting in jail 

 

it's rather telling though just by the lengths they have to go to compete with something (plants) far more interesting and beneficial to us all than them who seem to be carving it up into slices like a pie

 

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More trawling from High Times, whilst not Australian in nature, has direct bearing on what is about to happen here. Also I've been touting this line for a while:

 

http://hightimes.com/business/cannabis-investing-is-a-moral-imperative/

 

Truth is, if cannabis weren’t so profitable, it would be very easy for the war on cannabis to continue. But because this is now a multi-billion-dollar industry, any attempt at shutting it down would be an attack on local economies that are now thriving because of legalization on a state level.

Last year, sales from the North American cannabis industry came in around $6.7 billion. By 2021, they are expected to exceed $20 billion. That’s a compound annual growth rate of about 25 percent. That’s bigger and faster than what we saw back in the dot-com days.

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Thank god the Police minister waded in to prevent the moral fabric of SA society being ripped apart, and awesome citing of the research and studies backing up his opinion.. I mean informed view:

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-07-07/medicinal-cannabis-driving-plan-crazy,-sa-police-minister-says/8686688

 

Still movement though. Sneaky old SA though, acting like they might be first, when actually I'm quietly not watching ACT and NT. Very quiet thus far. Too quiet if you know what I mean?

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On 26/06/2017 at 11:27 AM, Responsible Choice said:

 

That’s bigger and faster than what we saw back in the dot-com days.

 

Erm, that can be interpreted two ways 

 

:wacko:

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Can't remember if this is true or not:

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2017-07-11/cannabis-can-thc-help-your-memory-dr-karl/8664654

 

One lousy month is not long enough to draw long-term conclusions from. What happens after three months? Do the older mice then go into an abrupt and irreversible decline? We just don't know.

So for our adult population, there are lots of caveats with this story.

It's way too early for anyone to think of self-medicating for memory loss with low levels of THC.

Unless of course you are a mouse that is willing to be a guinea pig.

 

Call me rodentus guineapigus then fuck yas!

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The full article is really interesting, monitoring epigenetic changes in gene expression, of genes associated with anti-aging and pro-aging, seems like a way better method than a simple memory test.

 

http://sci-hub.io/10.1038/nm.4311 

 

copied from article 

 

This result indicates that THC treatment affects molecular processes relevant to cell plasticity and signaling in mature animals. Upregulated transcripts included Klotho (Kl) (Fig. 2d and Supplementary Figs. 5 and 6), which is known to extend lifespan in different species 12–14 and to improve cognition15; transthyretin (Ttr), a gene that is thought to be protective against Alzheimer’s disease16,17; and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), an important neurotrophic factor that enhances synapse formation18 and cognitive functions19,20. The two transcripts that were most strongly downregulated in the mice after THC treatment corresponded to genes with potential pro-aging effects: caspase-1 (Casp1), which is involved in age-related impairments in cognition21, and connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf), which is known to enhance the pro-apoptotic activity of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)22 (Supplementary Fig. 7).

 

Together, these results demonstrate that the cognitive improvements in THC-treated mature mice were associated with a change in gene profiles; these changes and the associated cognitive improvements both lasted for several weeks after cessation of the treatment. The directions of the expression changes were such that the profiles of mature, THC-treated mice were most similar to those of young control mice, whereas THC treatment of young mice resulted in a gene expression pattern that was similar to that of vehicle-treated mature animals. This indicates that the enhanced CB1 tone achieved through low-dose THC treatment may have normalized the weak cannabinoid signaling signature in mature animals and thus reverted some of the age-related changes in gene expression, whereby several genes with antiaging effects were upregulated while genes contributing to aging were downregulated.

 

 

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wow.  no wonder i'm so smart.

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Can I get a hallelujah!? Not saying ice isn't nasty, but there's a fucking huge elephant in the room... 

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-02/governments-focus-on-methamphetamine-misplaced,-ama-says/8767664

 

Dr Wodak has seen the damaging effects of alcohol first hand, having worked in hospitals across the country for decades.

But he said many Australians either do not know, or do not want to know how big the issue is.

"We unfortunately have become almost immune, we don't see the alcohol problem," Dr Wodak said.

"But if you go to a hospital on a Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday night in the late evening or early morning, it just rolls in like it's an assembly line."

 

Wouldn't it be good if we had a safe, legal drug option...?

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These days in the news .. MMJ legalized in Greece as well :)

 

Congratulations !

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http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-26/big-tobacco-propping-up-law-enforcement-freedom-of-information/8841700

 

What it uncovered was big tobacco providing law enforcement with high-level intelligence, identifying targets, helping plan operations and tactics, and paying for surveillance technology.

 

No way big tobacco stands to lose out to cannabis legalisation though. Lucky, otherwise they might put their IMMENSE financial resources against its roll out, because that might lead to situations just like the federal government basically ignoring the will of the senate and muscling up on potential importers. Um, wait a minute...

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Hats off to Mr Noffs. Common sense on the ABC?!!! Who wooda fort?:o

 

If you take my income stream for drugs I will simply get drugs on 'layby', then sell them to support my habit. It doesn't take a fucking genius to figure it out. No, only a junkie in the WORST state of their life can figure that shit out. Is it 1984 yet? :huh:

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HEAR, HEAR! MR NOFFS!!!

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http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-31/nicole-bicknell-inquest3a-coronor-hands-down-findings-over-dea/8859856

 

If this 18 year old had've punched 18 cones in a row, she would've spewed and paled/ghosted/whited out. Not died. Pretty much same deal with edibles, but she would've tripped balls along with it for ages, which, don't get me wrong, is very dangerous for youngsters.

 

Schools should teach students that excessive alcohol consumption can be deadly, a WA coroner has recommended following the case of a Perth teenager who drank herself to death at her 18th birthday party.

 

I agree, but we live in a society which views education as a means to supply corporate masters with worker drones of the flavor they like/request/demand. The likelihood of this type of education really gaining traction and being applied in the classroom in my opinion is minimal, on a national scale at least, largely due to the fact that our trollopticians are in the pocket of big grog in Oz.. Probs will end up an 'Indigenous program' pushed onto some poor unsuspecting mob for their own good. Or some bullshit. Aint nobody got time for talking smack about grog in Straya mate.

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i fucken despise alcohol. 

 

imagine all the calamity it has caused and how it has shaped history over the last 5000 years and more.  you need only look at how it affected non-drinking native populations when strong drink was suddenly thrust upon them.

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I like it, but kinda like masturbation and submitting people. Someone getting potentially hurt is probably the common theme there though (especially with winter-chafed hands), and therein lies the appeal. I remember hearing that Jim Morrison liked alcohol for that reason, it's a roll of the dice, and you never really know where you will land; face up or face down homey. 

*For the record I don't drink. Do what you want with your being; as long as it doesn't hurt anyone else by doing so.

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that article broke my heart, such an unnecessary loss of life.:(   

 

i remember when i was in primary school we had Harold the giraffe https://www.lifeeducation.org.au i wish we had it at secondary school.. maybe the paragraph below wouldnt have happened?

the van was something different to the normal classroom setting and it wasnt our normal teacher so it seemed more exciting...  this kinda thing should be cruising to every school i reckon..

 

this doesnt relate so much to the article but more the theme of the thread,

 

i really dislike seeing people acting in what i think is fight or flight mode induced by alcohol, making less than intelligent, emotion filled responses to situations/people/external stimuli that normally wouldnt have such a profound affect on that being.. its dangerous. why do australians celebrate this state of being so heavily? besides in my opinion alcohol is probably the most boring and expensive drug you could take, i cant remember ever waking up from a binge session with some profound ideas about myself or the world, its mainly regret or guilt for something ive said or done to myself or someone else. some could say that is profound in that i might learn to not make those choices again but that only lasts till u have another drink...

 

i myself nearly stabbed a man to death (with his knife) that attacked me when i was 15, i didnt leave unscathed either, we were both drunk at the time , i think about it regularly how my life would be if he had hadnt made it or even better if 1 of us wasnt drunk or it didnt happen at all, unfortunately at the time, i wasnt capable of thinking rationally.. im 1 million percent positive if we were stoned it wouldnt have even started or i would have put the legs on and escaped before the situation ever happened. im not alone in this, many people of my age from the same area have some story of insane violence fuelled by alcohol.. maybe im just violent inside and thats me but i dont think thats the case an i hope the people around me feel the same. im sure there's people out there who can drink responsibly and might not ever run into trouble and thats great but mostly everyone that i know has at least some story or seen something hectic because of alcohol..

 

i dont think we should ban alcohol or make any further rules against what we can or cant do, the last thing we need is more regulation,  im sure if people were armed with more knowledge at an earlier age what it is and how it affects us all as a whole things might be different and maybe the young woman from the article would still be with us.

 

to end this on a lighter note.. the polar opposite of that horrible mess i experienced would have to be standing in the middle of the dancefloor at a festival and a stranger, soon to be rad mate packing me a massive cone, how can you top that? maybe 2 cones? and no fear of prosecution for being too chilled? 

end of rant.

 

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4 hours ago, saylor twift said:

that article broke my heart, such an unnecessary loss of life.:(   

 

i remember when i was in primary school we had Harold the giraffe https://www.lifeeducation.org.au i wish we had it at secondary school.. maybe the paragraph below wouldnt have happened?

the van was something different to the normal classroom setting and it wasnt our normal teacher so it seemed more exciting...  this kinda thing should be cruising to every school i reckon..

 

this doesnt relate so much to the article but more the theme of the thread,

 

i really dislike seeing people acting in what i think is fight or flight mode induced by alcohol, making less than intelligent, emotion filled responses to situations/people/external stimuli that normally wouldnt have such a profound affect on that being.. its dangerous. why do australians celebrate this state of being so heavily? besides in my opinion alcohol is probably the most boring and expensive drug you could take, i cant remember ever waking up from a binge session with some profound ideas about myself or the world, its mainly regret or guilt for something ive said or done to myself or someone else. some could say that is profound in that i might learn to not make those choices again but that only lasts till u have another drink...

 

i myself nearly stabbed a man to death (with his knife) that attacked me when i was 15, i didnt leave unscathed either, we were both drunk at the time , i think about it regularly how my life would be if he had hadnt made it or even better if 1 of us wasnt drunk or it didnt happen at all, unfortunately at the time, i wasnt capable of thinking rationally.. im 1 million percent positive if we were stoned it wouldnt have even started or i would have put the legs on and escaped before the situation ever happened. im not alone in this, many people of my age from the same area have some story of insane violence fuelled by alcohol.. maybe im just violent inside and thats me but i dont think thats the case an i hope the people around me feel the same. im sure there's people out there who can drink responsibly and might not ever run into trouble and thats great but mostly everyone that i know has at least some story or seen something hectic because of alcohol..

 

i dont think we should ban alcohol or make any further rules against what we can or cant do, the last thing we need is more regulation,  im sure if people were armed with more knowledge at an earlier age what it is and how it affects us all as a whole things might be different and maybe the young woman from the article would still be with us.

 

to end this on a lighter note.. the polar opposite of that horrible mess i experienced would have to be standing in the middle of the dancefloor at a festival and a stranger, soon to be rad mate packing me a massive cone, how can you top that? maybe 2 cones? and no fear of prosecution for being too chilled? 

end of rant.

 

For some reason we don't celebrate cannabis, instead we unofficially tolerate it and perpetuate negative stereotypes about heavy smokers, slapping people at random with fines and court appearances while supply remains unaffected and everyone has tried it.  

 

Really makes no sense.

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i immediately thought of the stoner sloth campaign when i read your comment.. so ridiculous! i cant make sense of it either, its really disappointing and kinda childish?

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21 hours ago, ThunderIdeal said:

i fucken despise alcohol. 

 

imagine all the calamity it has caused and how it has shaped history over the last 5000 years and more.  you need only look at how it affected non-drinking native populations when strong drink was suddenly thrust upon them.

LMAO,  Cheers to another 5000 years. 

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On 01/09/2017 at 0:59 PM, saylor twift said:

i remember when i was in primary school we had Harold the giraffe https://www.lifeeducation.org.au i wish we had it at secondary school.. maybe the paragraph below wouldnt have happened?

the van was something different to the normal classroom setting and it wasnt our normal teacher so it seemed more exciting...  this kinda thing should be cruising to every school i reckon..

 

lol I was just listening to someone from the foundation who created Harold talking about how that was not their finest moment and how that whole "just say no" campaign has been a resounding failure. People working in drug education/harm minimisation are now trying to bring the focus more on well...actual education, rather than just avoidance. Instead of "Just say no", we should have: "Just say KNOW". They talked about how the image of "happy healthy Harold" implies a standard of normal healthy behaviour that compels people to hide their drug use, which in turn leads to much harm. When there is pretty good evidence that social contact helps recovery immensely. So if we would just stop telling people that their habits are socially unacceptable, they wouldn't be so socially isolated, and would have a much better chance of avoiding many of the harms of drug use & addiction. Which I thought was a pretty spot-on analysis.

 

They also talked about how it is near fucking impossible to get real drug education in classrooms though, thanks to conservative parental types. A few years back some schools in Western Sydney tried it, printing pamphlets with a harm minimisation bent - so rather than "don't use drugs", the message was "how to use drugs safely". It ended in a literal book-burning as angry parents set fire to all the pamphlets they could find. So maybe Happy Harold is as good as you can get, in that context.

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^ more like 50 to 100.  We must be the most recalcitrant western nation in the world.

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I had a mate call the "Dob in a vaper" hotline in QLD whilst he was visiting from VIC and dob himself in.

 

The to and fro with the email was hilarious. But they didn't send out the SWAT team and basically all it ended in was them telling him to go and drop off his nicotine containing eliquid to a poisons centre.

 

But there have been raids and customs seizures (despite nicotine not being illegal on a federal level). People dosing themselves with vapourised liquid nicotine rather than smoking highly taxed and extremely toxic tobacco have caught the brunt of the courts and landed massive fines in Queensland.

 

So is it a social issue or a political issue these archaic laws? Both maybe? I can't see the way that Australia will ever overcome it's protectionist policies. Everything will be either illegal or compulsory in the not too distant future. :rolleyes:

 

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