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holymountain

Creating an Outdoor Patch for Woodlovers or Subs

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awesome setup there holymountain I hope it all works out (which it will :wink:) and you get a fuckload of plentiful flushes for years to come.

One question which springs to mind is how to keep the patch/mycelium sustained in terms of food & moisture during the off season? I guess monthly waterings would be enough but whats the longest stretch you'd go without watering?

I recently embarked on making my own home patch using all the stubs from a certain little successful hunt and layered them between paper & cardboard then set them under a very shady bush and covered with leaves & thin layers of wood. Hoping it spawns & survives so i'll at least get one decent little flush from it, that moment will be one to hold onto im sure!

Edited by mu!

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We are all keen to hear of the progress of the outdoor patch , if any Holymountain. Please ......

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Yeah, what she said ^^^ :)

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yep!

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hes not living at the same pad as far as i am aware. lucky peeps who took over that rental!

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My patch from last seasons myc has not fruited although the myc had spread nicley.

My fingers are crossed this cold snap might trigger some action.

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small scale can be ok too. my big outdoor bed got destroyed recently but these are from pot plant.

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i put about two handfulls of pine chips and some myc from 2 varieties of subs in when i planted a catnip plant in here. i just put it under the deck when the times right, the plant slowly dies from lack of light but i just replace it and bring it out in the spring again. 3rd year this has fruited, alot get lost to snails when growing small scale wich is frustrating. i think it could work well for indoor ferns and such..

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2meke, that's great! Well done. Maybe you can stick a copper ribbon around the perimeter of the pot. Along the rim. That keeps the slugs and snails out, apparently.

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absolutely! great job. small scale might even be better for most people. i have had to move so many times in the last few years that I've never gotten to see my outdoor patches fruit. small wooden boxes or even cardboard boxes can be used just make sure they are not too deep or the chips at the bottom of the box will go soggy.

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hey I got a semi-colonised substrate. Summer is coming. I know I should have already prepared and planted it from february or march... Should I try to create the outdoor patch now or after the heats of summer thus burrying the spawn in the begining of automn??

I am still thinking of trying to see if a part of it would fruit in the fridge...

small scale sounds awesome! having them in plant pots too!

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i would start now! i've heard that the mycellium does most of it's growing in the warmer months and fruits in the colder months.

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yeah man if you get it started in summer it'll fruit in autumn. with sum watering and good positioning my home patches will fruit months before the wild patches. i'd love to get some dung lovers to try in the off season!

but in saying that it was also pretty warm when my first subs were coming thru wich makes me wonder if they really are that dependent on the cold...

so i wana try some experimenting in the warmer months. we'll see i guess

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thanks for the tip marcel!

theres alot of info saying slugs and snails hate copper. very usefull

Edited by 2meke

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Thanks guys!

Should I start soaking wood and wood chips and for how long?

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is your mulch fresh? they dont seem to like fresh timber. i'ts best if the mulch is sun bleached, or i think boiling fresh stuff will help get some of the sap out.

if the woods ready put down your substrate with some wood ontop (3-5cm) then water and cover with something to keep moisture in like old blankets or hessian sacks. (and now i think of it you could lightly case each layer). keep watering and when the myc reaches the top put another layer of wood on. if you are noticing some competition use smaller layers of mulch. and i pasturise mine. repeat this till all your woods down or autumn is aproaching. obviously the more wood the better too. when you put down your final layer of mulch case it with soil or whatever and grass seed it if you want.

the other option is to spread your substrate thru all the mulch, lay it down and case. which will only work if you have alot of substrate.

these 2 methods will help stop un wanted mould and fungi competeing with your precious fungi.

thats my 2c anyway.

Edited by 2meke

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thanks, i will let you know

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thanks, i will let you know

I juzt want to express my deepest gratitude for being part of The Corroboree. Thankyou. xx Cariboudle

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thanks for that last comment HM. i have been watching the postings of your project with interest since last season. i think i read that you had to move house from that outdoor setup you photodocumented so well for us. shame about that.

i took your advice last season with the hessian, but methinks i got there too late:

some sub myc i had on moist cardboard, in a plastic lunchbox, in a wardrobe, for some weeks, was going ok(being careful as practicable about not ever having the lid off too often). i did have to peel off layers of spot-moulded cardboard so as not to have it mingle with the god stuff. in the end, i left it to its own devices too long and lost the p.sub myc to dryness and mould. i'm holdin out that the spec of myc i managed to put in hessian might revive over winter. though i wont look till spring or something (in the meantime i'll try random cultivation of g.purps - see photos of recent walks that i'll post asap in the thread for that species).

go the myc, go the hessian

Edited by wassonova

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sorry. inebriated when wrote last post (and still now). i was writing in response to HM's post of 30 june 2010 - which is actually a year ago to the day, by coincidence.

read further along the thread and it just gets better. this is where it's at for mycophiles.

Edited by wassonova

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absolutely! great job. small scale might even be better for most people. i have had to move so many times in the last few years that I've never gotten to see my outdoor patches fruit. small wooden boxes or even cardboard boxes can be used just make sure they are not too deep or the chips at the bottom of the box will go soggy.

Another option is to lay the patch on a layer or two of that holey shadecloth.

That way the patch can be moved whenever required.

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...pin this thread for australia's sake

Amen, Brother! :lol:

Great stuff there holymountain! Definately going to have to give something like this a go!

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Wrote this post for another thread containing much info pertaining to this thread.

Topping up with woodchips would be the basic strategy. Smaller chips to provide a larger surface area so as to produce a larger mycelial reservoir to ensure good fruitings and larger chips to provide some opennese of substrate so it can breathe and for sustainable sustanance. A little clean organic soil added may be beneficial for added trace elements/minerals but one should avoid anything that has added fertilizers or manure as this may encourage the growth of pathogenic bacteria. One should also avoid anything with added dolomite.

A little charcoal may be beneficial and other than that the only fertiliser that I feel comfortable with is a dilute seaweed extract to provide potassium which has been associated with fast growing fungi and which may contain hormones that boost growth. If increased water retention is desired a little vermiculite may be added.

And some eye candy and inspiration in the form of a gym patch.

S6300552cr3.jpg

Edited by Mycot
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Though from a Thread some years old and the uneven ripening I contributed the pic to give folks some idea of how rewarding outdoor beds can be, often for no more effort than a much smaller indoor grow.

There are different approaches in making outdoor beds. In this case the substrate was first colonised under controlled temperature conditions before being laid out into a bed 5x2 ft.

Keeping a couple colonising jars(even baby food jars) of substrate enables one to observe and experiment for optimum conditions. If one experiment goes really bad you've got a backup.

The addition of small amounts of soil to the woodchips has been observed to be beneficial for a number of reasons. The mycelium colonises wood that is moist and not wet. After boiling the chips to hydrate and sterize excess moisture may be drawn off by newspaper. If they stick to the paper they're too wet.

The addition of vermiculite serves as a water buffer since the water of moist chips is quickly enough used up. What I do when I add it is to wet it then squeeze it out to field capacity and then fluff it up before adding to the substrate. Smaller amounts of colonized substrate can be rapidly multiplied by mixing with an equal amount of fresh substrate. More info can be found in the thread link.

Have fun experimenting. :)

Edited by Mycot
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Double post.

Edited by Mycot

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