Jump to content
The Corroboree
Sign in to follow this  
Philocacti

Rootstock size .....matters

Recommended Posts

So I wrote his long ass topic but my machine froze before I pressed "post", so I'll retype this way shorter.

I grafted 4 clones twice, once to a "big" rootstock (~40-50 cm) and the other to a shorter stock (~10-20 cm).

The three clones are: eileen, a peruvianus, an open-pollinated huanucoensis, and Eulychnia castanea. The rootstock is Stenocereus (I might have 2 different species, I don't know).

Open-pollinated huanucoensis seedling:

On a short stock (the scion was a midpiece of the seedling)

post-6382-0-61175100-1455078287_thumb.jp

On a big stock (the tip of the seedling)

post-6382-0-62655300-1455078553_thumb.jp

eileen (both grafts were tips)

On a short stock

post-6382-0-78764900-1455078615_thumb.jp

On a big stock

post-6382-0-05547200-1455078723_thumb.jp

Peruvianus (this one http://www.shaman-australis.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=41662)

On a short stock (tip graft)

post-6382-0-50812300-1455078865_thumb.jp

On a big stock (midpiece cut in half)

post-6382-0-57009900-1455078883_thumb.jp

Eulychnia castanea

On a short stock

post-6382-0-00480100-1455079009_thumb.jp

On a big stock

post-6382-0-13292700-1455079072_thumb.jp

As seen in the pics, scions of the same clone on bigger rootstock display more mature characteristics, in rib and areol formation, spine thickness and density than those that are grafted on shorter rootstock.

With minor changes this could've been a scientific experiment, but it all happened by pure chance. That's why there are a lot of variables that I didn't stabilize. Anyway, this could be preliminary evidence that rootstock size does really matter.

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bigger the root the more orgazmic activity.

Pump it!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

awesome info, awesome grafts

the growth on that Eulychnia is amazing!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ladies have been telling me this for years. It's why they all leave. Nobody is satisfied with a micrograft anymore.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bigger the root the more orgazmic activity.

Pump it!

That makes me the pimp ;)

Thanks sagi, I already cut off 5 decent cuttings and gifted them to friends. I'm kind of doubting that the powerful feeding of the Stenocereus rootstock is making all the pups grow in their normal monstrose form and non is spiral.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great info. What about for lophs? Super fat scops work well? Pascana?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

crest grafted onto a 24" tall, super fat Myrt geo

EG- this pic is one of many I will email you for your loph site :wink:

24339477744_74cf8b1acf_b.jpgCrestGraftFLR5399a

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you think better or worse allignment of the scion has any affect on the scion growth?? I feel in my experience that the allignment is a pretty big variable IE the graft will grow if there is a vascular connection but how fast isn't always due to the stock used

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes rootstock size matters. But, i have a question, sorta related i guess. just how long can a cactus (peruvian variant) stay alive for without soil, water, and feed?

i ask this as last year (march) i made cutting i was going to use for a casting idea. i didnt get round to it with all the shit going on here, and just left it on the table. to this day it's still there. growing on. color is lighter (light green) has thrown some roots out here n there but rooted to nothing (being on table, painted wood, inside near a closed window). it's growing well considering it has not seen water, feed, or earth for about a year. seems it will live on forever like this. is this normal or do i have some freak?

Edited by ghosty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it has not seen water, feed, or earth for about a year. seems it will live on forever like this. is this normal

yup

I've got a couple of peru cuts in full sun doing the exact same thing, going on 2 years now. all they get is very infrequent rain.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks zelly =) that pic few posts up is awesome. good photo too. i can only imagine what you could do with a camera with multi-focus..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great info. What about for lophs? Super fat scops work well? Pascana?

Thank you, I don't have any Lophophoras grafted to different sized rootstock of the same species, so I have no data. I'll try to do it this coming season ;)

I've only made few grafts on trichocereus stock, but I find Trichocereus, myrtillocactus inferior to Stenocereus. But then again, I've only used short rootstocks of these species, so maybe that's why I had inferior results ;)

Zelly that's a beautiful crest :0

Do you think better or worse allignment of the scion has any affect on the scion growth?? I feel in my experience that the allignment is a pretty big variable IE the graft will grow if there is a vascular connection but how fast isn't always due to the stock used

Personally, I think alignment makes a difference, but I believe (observational theory) that the amount of pressure that is applied on during grafting also makes a big difference. So both of them will make the difference.

yes rootstock size matters. But, i have a question, sorta related i guess. just how long can a cactus (peruvian variant) stay alive for without soil, water, and feed?

i ask this as last year (march) i made cutting i was going to use for a casting idea. i didnt get round to it with all the shit going on here, and just left it on the table. to this day it's still there. growing on. color is lighter (light green) has thrown some roots out here n there but rooted to nothing (being on table, painted wood, inside near a closed window). it's growing well considering it has not seen water, feed, or earth for about a year. seems it will live on forever like this. is this normal or do i have some freak?

I wouldn't know about that at all, since I plant all the cuttings I take 3-7 days (in the active season) after I cut them. And I water them with the same schedule as my rooted plants. In the winter, I just stick the cuttings in soil after they scab and don't water them. I start watering when it's warm enough and they grow just fine.

So I never know when cuttings have grown roots or not ;)

Hopefully someone with experience can answer your question ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, I don't have any Lophophoras grafted to different sized rootstock of the same species, so I have no data. I'll try to do it this coming season ;)

I've only made few grafts on trichocereus stock, but I find Trichocereus, myrtillocactus inferior to Stenocereus. But then again, I've only used short rootstocks of these species, so maybe that's why I had inferior results ;)

Zelly that's a beautiful crest :0

Personally, I think alignment makes a difference, but I believe (observational theory) that the amount of pressure that is applied on during grafting also makes a big difference. So both of them will make the difference.

I wouldn't know about that at all, since I plant all the cuttings I take 3-7 days (in the active season) after I cut them. And I water them with the same schedule as my rooted plants. In the winter, I just stick the cuttings in soil after they scab and don't water them. I start watering when it's warm enough and they grow just fine.

So I never know when cuttings have grown roots or not ;)

Hopefully someone with experience can answer your question ;)

Thanks, but i already got a genuine reply. Although it's always nice to see others make inplications of me being cruel to a cactus in the name of new art forms =) thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't like to do this... share my secrets. But I like this community allot especially the cacti enthusiasts.

6 yrs ago this was a little pup no bigger than a 20 cent piece...

20160212_193658_zpsrtimqaui.jpg

so how was this achived?

Step 1. Grafted tiny button to pachanoi rootstock about 5" tall CUTTING.

step 2. After propper union and callus formation and growth recognized... cut the pachanoi root stock at its base and graft onto BIG FAT scop CUTTING!!!

20160212_193621_zpsi3jva1uc.jpg

step345678 n so on just drool!!!

20160212_193710_zpsg6eyatmq.jpg

you will never compete with me you pereskiophiles. Muuhahahaha.......

Edit: could have been five years ago actually when I think about it.

Tip. The graft of loph to pach and loph/pach to scop done in same season so the vasculars are nice and fresh... that is most important.

Dont even bother trying this method if you cant get both grafts done in the same growing season.cool.

Oh and I just remembered now that I trimmed the bottom half of this scion about 2 1/2 yrs ago to expose the pachanoi so the loph didn't choke it and starve to death. So I at that point in time had removed about 1 3rd of the scion.

It would be massive if I didn't cut it but you need to be carefull with your pach cutting as the lophs powerfull growth will cut off its circulation. Lol.

Edited by wert
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ Much respect Wert :wub: thanks for sharing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×