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sagiXsagi

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About sagiXsagi

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    Shaman's Apprentice

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    Male
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    europe
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    lots

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    USDA ~9, Mediterranean

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  1. sagiXsagi

    Ephedra sp. cultivation notes and discussion

    Short update + pictures , as I was tidying up a bit today : Indeed , for such a hot and dry summer as mine in zone 9 southern greece, placing plants under shade in the summer seems to work wonders, resulting in a more care free style of plantcaring . But you have to change to sunnier positions the rest of the year.. I got 4x Ephedra feldschenkoi plants, put then in a more clay based soil. These are supposed to be in the E.minima category, very short, small bushy, slightly crawling and 4 x E. intermedia plants , those are supposed to be the intermediate form between the shorter sinica and the taller equisetina. all newcomers are seed growns , they came with some while etiolation in the package, but I trained them in shade and they seem to be doing great so far.. Intermedia seem like vigorous plants, I wonder how they will compare, since my equisetina started from damaged and stressed rooted cutting / branch took its time to take off.. By the way I made my first attempt at propagating equisetina today, here's a pic of the mother plant after the proceedure. Fingers crossed! I have been postponing to transplant my biggest E.chiloensis to bigger pot, its been in the same pot with a big variegated cactus , a polaskia chichipe crest for many years .. Part of me was afraid of the stress.. Anyways, here some of the fattest branches of my biggy chiloensis . Definately my small experience and losses have taught me that chiloensis and propably any american species is better of in poor clay/sand style soil mixed only with a tid bit of nutricious compost soil. I am quite positive now that I woulnt have lost the american species I have lost if I had consistently used such poor heavy substrate and yet another 2 pics
  2. sagiXsagi

    Growing HBWR

    its one of the best plants to grow, but it can respond badly to cutting back, contrary to, say caapi.. Once I had a turbina strangle and kill mine (they were traveling up the same way towards the next floors. I have also had one in a big barrel flower at 15 months from sowing. I think both argyreia and turbina can react badly to insufficient water ... Still not sure why my turbina died...
  3. these berries are really sweet . tastes really like a negelected superfood the population is thriving after the fire .. new sprouts do not cone unburnt plants fruit heavily
  4. sagiXsagi

    Ephedra sp. cultivation notes and discussion

    well my friend , I think that the whole shit started with usa alcohol prohibition because USA... that mentality. and then they decided they would grade drugs and enoforce this to the whole fucking world, because they had a failed psychdelic revolution in their hands... drug classification in my country is nuts and thats because we have the USA paradigm ......
  5. sagiXsagi

    Ephedra sp. cultivation notes and discussion

    Having said all this, distachya , major, fragilis, foeminea are less likely to die from overwatering, and once established they are really OK being wet all year round in my zone 9 roof, and now I almost have them all in permanent semishade even sinicas during the heat of the summer except a couple of them, and those ones that are in full sun, I have to be more carefull so that they dont dry up.... so yeah, after a while, and especially in summer, the worry is never the overwatering, its the drying up if they are not watered often enough .... I also thing that the more they grow the more vegetative growths per year the do, especially distachya once it gets going , in the right climate it will grow almost yeararound... if you prune a fragilis, it responds back quickly, it does thick new sprouts ... they are very strong plants, especially fragilis... . sinica and seemingly equisetina are kinda in the middle in terms of how prone to rotting are ... and the american species are the most tricky, at least in my experience... thing is, once they are established (size and a routine) , they are kind of easy-going plants, almost care-free, and I am currently in a state I have 3 chiloensis at this advanced, wood at the based stage.. I lost a big viridis approaching this stage which was a pity.. Well I think plant material might be more suitable for a therepeutic approach than isolated alkaloids, propably european distachyas have the best profile ( medium PE and low E ) for these kind of treatments. But I also think that maybe when taken for a long time for a therapeutic scheme , you might have to have on and off periods.. I think these alkaloids can be kinda cumulative and I also know they actively change your metabolism.. So in a case where they were needed for a treatment, I would definately consider periodic off times and maybe substitute pill PE with distachya .. Its often said that the whole herb is more therapeytically active than isolated compouds, maybe this is also true with ephedra.. NEWS/UPDATES: well I went to the distachya habitat today and I found a several plants packed with fruits, or more correctly cones... I have tried some fominea fruits , they are pleasant but hardly any sweet usually, now I had tried some of my own unknown progeny distachyas fruits, and sometimes they are very pleasant and sweet... now, I tasted those wild ones from my area , man those are very sweet fruits and pretty big fruits, fleshy, and juicy.. (distachya does 3 pairs of fleshy cone bracts) ... THere's a asian paper on the nutricional value of sinica fruit... Its really puzzling how this plant is boycotted from the collective knowledge - because the implications with everything are too huge to ignore.. I mean you cant fucking ignore the ephedra genus.. the fuckers have multiple value in several science fields .. to be continued in the the habitat thread
  6. sagiXsagi

    Ephedra sp. cultivation notes and discussion

    you are right in the principle.. any suggestion will be better when customised to species, plant age + history, plant container , climate , microhabitat and caring habit. I have found that the easiest to die on me were the american species, so they particularly need free-drainage .. And its these species who hate it more to be wet over extended periods of time when they are 'sleeping/resting' . Yet its also possible you loose them if you forget them too dry - which then the plants usually warn you by drying off parts of their branches. Those species seem to like heavier and poorer in nutricionals clay-sand substrate , whereas distachya, major, fragilis, foeminea and even established sinicas was grow in typical garden plants soil. Putting pebbles in the soil surface seems to help in any species, any age and any pot size. as for fragilis vs major, I think I have begun to figure out a way to tell in established habitat plants or big plants in the ground, but its not as easy in plants in containers, well not until you have them growing side to side which I plan to do next season with new well-IDed seeds from spain. more or less, fragilis is bigger with fatter branches and it also tends to create sucker shoots more readily. Major is more erect too. But other wise they are very similar. on my good news, today I picked the first chiloensis seeds !!!! woohoo! the fruits cones fleshy bracts do not become red or as bloated as other species, they are pinkish.
  7. sagiXsagi

    Ephedra sp. cultivation notes and discussion

    Good news , the last chiloensis turnt up a female (see pic) , so I am hopeful for seed this season! Also check out a couple of pictures from the equisetina explosion of growth, which I de-weeded today.
  8. sagiXsagi

    Ephedra sp. cultivation notes and discussion

    Thanks for kind words. To be honest I had never thought about that, and its a pretty damn interesting point. You see, once ephedras are of a certain size and above they are quite easy-going and the only problem is a potential drying out, if you forget watering them in the summer months, especially in dry and hot summers. So, going from how much they like being in big containers, I would say that maybe that could be cool tip. In summer put most of mine in a spot that gets bright shade in the noon and they tolerate the summer much better there. I might try your idea this summer with some plants! ****** Oh well, the 3rd seed grown sinica proved another male, and this means I have 4 different male sinica plants, including the 3 seed growns and the one I got from ebay as a rooted sucker. The quest for a female continues! Here are the 3 seed growns, the one in the right is still growing and hasnt fully bloomed. Oh, the other day I saw my last chiloensis to have formed cone buds, still hoping for a female in that front! some pretty cool pictures from my equisetina, showing new growth which makes a nice contrast with the older blue segments , and making sucker-offshoots! seems I might be able to propagate it next year
  9. Ephedra plants are available for sale (~20-30 euros per plant) , EUROPE ONLY distachya (male, female) sinica (male) fragilis (?) ask via PM
  10. sagiXsagi

    Ephedra sp. cultivation notes and discussion

    After some years from seed, around 4-6 years, sinica does suckers. Thats why one should not plant them in containers with holes at the sides (of course the same goes for distachya) . Waiting for the last seed grown sinica to reveal its sex, hoping its a female this time.
  11. man I hate it that I should downside all pictures to post in here ... damn.... this is a healthy relic population that still shows how the species acts in its natural habitat ... this seems to be too healhty, maybe the healthiest greek population or maybe the people writing papers on distributions + behaviours of plants are as negligent as people who perpetuated the several problems in ephedra taxonomy .. Damn fucking scientists
  12. Pictures from a spot that seems to have been completely burnt in summer 2021. There's a picture that you should zoom in to see whats hapeing... I saw so many new sprouts in some places, and knowing how fragile fresh ephedra shoots are, I decided I should not go there soon, such a hippy sensitive idiot I am with that fresh shoots , lol.... I have been doing progress since then elesewhere though ...
  13. tenontitis man educated guess for both or any location in greece, says E. foeminea, the large, climber one, which is distruibuted in all greece and is not very unusual in indisturbed habitats and archeological places .. E. distachya is rarer and more habitat specific and E.major (E.nebrodensis) is even rarer and I havent seen it in habitat. yours should be foeminea, its an impressive plant !
  14. sounds like what you call major is a distachya .. its definately greener than major and fragilis and its easy to propagate through suckers when cultivated in pots..
  15. pictures have to be less than 1 MB in size to be uploaded yes they have leaves, temporary leaves which wither and die and leave 'scales' in the notches which are aften characteristic for the species, generally speaking or PM me and we talk via email
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