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Gimli

Complete List of Trichocereus Clones

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Seen a few lists cobbled together, so thought I'd try put together a more complete list? If there are any I've missed (no doubt I have) or a clone is under the wrong category, please comment or swing me a PM

 

Bridgesii:

33
Albi

Alko
Anna

Arid Art

Baker5452
Ben

Bert

Bendigo

Big Bertha

Brad
Bruce

Cactus Land ?
Cliff

Con

Cornucopia ?
Crazy Spine

CSD
Eileen

Emerald City

Emma

Essendon ?

Ferret ?

Fields Bridgesii

Funkoid

Glenrowan

Greedo ?

Hans ?

Helen
JB

Kai

Killer Green Cactus

Light ?

Lorraine ?

Lotusland
Lumberjack

MB95

Medicine Man
Melted Wax

Mike (Old Mike - WA) ?

Mongy

Mum & Dad
N1

Nats Wax
Psycho0

Serra Canyon ?

Sherman

Short Spine
Sina
Sir Jeans
SS02

TBM
TBM Variegated
TBMC
TBMC Variegated

Tig ?

Tim ?

Urban Tribes #1

Urban Tribes #2

Wowie

 

Chalaensis:

SS04

 

Knuthianus:

Bluth

Fields Knuthianus

SS03

 

Macrogonus:

Bendy ?

Fields Macrogonus

Hyperspacepixie ?

Tipz

Tripsis ?

 

Pachanoi:
Alf

Altmans Monstrose ?

Awful
Bogan
Clone One (MT01)
Clone Two (MT02)

Fields Pachanoi

Frasers ?

Hahn

Hamiltons

Huarazensis

Hutchison 1597

Hutchison 6212
J2
Justin

Juuls' Giant

KK339
Kimnach
Kimura’s Giant

Landfill

L.E.R.

Mike ?

MT03 Woody

MT06 Lupita

Music Teacher

NoThink

Olivia

Omar

Oscar

OSP (Old School/Skool/ Pedro/Pachanoi)

Ogunbodede
PC

Rob
Rod

Roy

Saquarema

Skip

Strybring

Torres & Torres

TPM

TPQC ?

WA Pachanoi ?

Warrah ?
Yowie

Zeus

 

Peruvianus:

86

Anakie

Argentinensis

Bonny

Bryan

Cactus Garage ?

Chavin (MT05)

Christies

Clyde

Colossus

Dawson's Peruvianus

Fahim01

Endorfinder (Huancabamba)

Gawler

Gnosis
Goliath

Hahn

Hamiltons
HB1 - Herbalistics? (HB01*) ?
Ivan
J1
J3
John

Kimba ?

Len

Los Gentiles
MG Red Spine

Norma

Ohlone

Old Teds
Rosei #1
Rosei #2

Sausage
Sharxx Blue

SS01

TPC

TPM

TPM Variegated

Trent

Tripsis #2

Yoda

 

Scopulicola:

Scop A

Scop B

Cordobensis

FR991

HELON

Hulk

SGC16

Super Pedro ?

Worm

Zed's

 

Terscheckii:

Big Blue ?

Dawsons Long Spine

Ruby Visions

 

Validus:

Fields Validus ?

SA SS 1 - South Australian Short Spine 1

SA SS 2 - South Australian Short Spine 2

 

Other:

Dr Funkenstein

Judith

 

Eventually I'll add link to trichocereus.net or other for each

Edited by Gimli
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Hey Gimli, great idea for a thread. We´ll enlarge it over the next months. 
About the list. Icaro DNA is a strain. Most of them are seed grown and not genetically identical. Bogan is probably somewhere in between T. pachanoi and peruvianus. I have it as Pachanoi on the site, but it should probably not be seen as standard Pachanoi. We could leave it in Pachanoi, but add a note that it could as well be seen as short spine Peruvianus. It gets very spiny sometimes. But yeah, good thread!  

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Nice one gimli. It’ll be interesting to se how big this list gets. There’s sooooo many clones. Is the list specifically not hybrids? It’d be good to get a hybrid thread too with parentage info too...

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Great idea Gimli!

 

I would add: 

 

Bridgesii:

  • TBM
  • TBMC
  • Variegated TBMC
  • Brad
  • Helen

Pachanoi:

  • Juul's Giant
  • Ogunbodede
  • Landfill
  • Oscar

Peruvianus:

  • Gawler
  • MT05 / Chavin

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L.E.R. is an old pachanoi that has been around for some time from the now defunct Legendary Ethnobotanical Resources. A specimen that flowered profusely at under 2 feet of height. Thought it might be worth mentioning for those interested in early flowering specimens. I'm sure there are others I've missed, but for now I'll leave it at this one.

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Teotz will be creaming himself.... Lol

 

I'd put Bogan to the peru/macro side, but each to their own.

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I'd also add:

Pachanoi

Skip

Awful

Hutchison 6212

Hutchison 1597

Torres & Torres

Kimnach

Strybring

Olivia

Fields Pachanoi

 

Bridgesii

CSD

Sherman

Baker5452

Killer Green Cactus

Bertha

Emma

Medicine Man

Wowie

N1

Lumberjack (maybe hybrid?)

Fields Bridgesii

 

Peruvianus

Bonny

Clyde

Len

Dawson's Peruvianus

 

And don't forget Scops!

 

Scopulicola

Zed's

Hulk

SGC16

 

Edited by TheUpsideDown
Spelling

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.

Edited by Gimli

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Added some more.

Feel free to correct/add

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Mate great list. Personally I think its a taxonomic error to separate these into different species, but using most peoples terms,

bridgesii:

Kai

Glenrowan

macrogonus:

Tipz

Field's macrogonis

scopulicola:

HELON (like Spooge keeps saying 'the Australian clone is spelled with capitols') to me looks similar to Super Pedro, so I put it in the same place.

Edited by Crop

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Has anyone heard of a clone? called "Buddhist Monastery" ?

 

Origins?

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Add Pachanoi “ Frasers”

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what's the meaning of the question marks on some of them ? unsure if it's and existing clone or which grouping it should be in ?

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i think the scopulicola thing needs to be re-worked.....seems that in Aus a scop can be spineless OR can have spines like a super pedro (HELON) which is just wrong imho.     I have arse loads of scop hybrids with spines....are they too all HELONS?

 

 

on this side of the pond we have cordobensis AND spineless scop.

 

super pedro & cordobensis are the same plant & they are not pure spineless scops, imho they're hybrids of scop & something else.

 

I have a buncha pure spineless SEEDLINGS from aussie seed......why isnt MB scop & BB scop listed under the scop section?  They're both spineless.  Is there a differentiation between MB's spineless scop, BB's spineless scop & my spineless scop??

 

 

This hulk you speak of, is it spineless or does it look super pedro like.  If spineless, why muddle the scop classification?

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HULK is a spineless scop introduced by incognito..

 

I can add ' LC Scopulicola' - a spineless plant named by myself, after the anonymous SAB-er who sent me the cutting and made hybrid seeds LC scop X Scop

 

SAM_1388.JPG

 

A funny analogy might become:

Pachanoi -> Pachanot

Scopulicola -> Scopulinot

 

:lol:

 

There are and will be some scop x [trichocereus ] hybrids that will not be distinguishable at all from the mother scops and the gene pool will get more diverse along the years..

 

Spineless scop is the scop.. anything else.. well ..SCOPULINOT:wink:

 

 

All plants will soon have gene sequence identificators instead of names anyway :rolleyes:

 

Edited by mysubtleascention
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20 hours ago, Matt1208 said:

what's the meaning of the question marks on some of them ? unsure if it's and existing clone or which grouping it should be in ?

 

Is it an actual clone

Is it already listed

 

18 hours ago, zelly said:

i think the scopulicola thing needs to be re-worked.....seems that in Aus a scop can be spineless OR can have spines like a super pedro (HELON) which is just wrong imho.     I have arse loads of scop hybrids with spines....are they too all HELONS?

 

 

on this side of the pond we have cordobensis AND spineless scop.

 

super pedro & cordobensis are the same plant & they are not pure spineless scops, imho they're hybrids of scop & something else.

 

I have a buncha pure spineless SEEDLINGS from aussie seed......why isnt MB scop & BB scop listed under the scop section?  They're both spineless.  Is there a differentiation between MB's spineless scop, BB's spineless scop & my spineless scop??

 

 

This hulk you speak of, is it spineless or does it look super pedro like.  If spineless, why muddle the scop classification?

 

Should I change it to Scopulicoloid? Nice robust comment and comments in this thread.

 

 

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On 5/5/2018 at 10:18 AM, zelly said:

i think the scopulicola thing needs to be re-worked.....seems that in Aus a scop can be spineless OR can have spines like a super pedro (HELON) which is just wrong imho.     I have arse loads of scop hybrids with spines....are they too all HELONS?

 

 

on this side of the pond we have cordobensis AND spineless scop.

 

super pedro & cordobensis are the same plant & they are not pure spineless scops, imho they're hybrids of scop & something else.

 

I have a buncha pure spineless SEEDLINGS from aussie seed......why isnt MB scop & BB scop listed under the scop section?  They're both spineless.  Is there a differentiation between MB's spineless scop, BB's spineless scop & my spineless scop??

 

 

This hulk you speak of, is it spineless or does it look super pedro like.  If spineless, why muddle the scop classification?

I don't believe names have to be classifications. If a person names a pure species or even a hybrid T. scopulicola seedling Helon then only it and its clones can be Helons if the name is referring to a specific clone. If however the name is referring to a specific cross or type of cross as is the case with Brugmansia aurea x Brugmansia versicolor seedlings being named B. candida or B. sanguinea x B. arborea hybrids being called B. flava. Sometimes one names the specific type of cross done such as Zelly being a cross between a fat Scopulicola and Grandiflorus hybrid. If we can have many Zelly hybrids with numbers to designate different ones we are keeping track of the specific clones identified by the number after the word Zelly which denotes a classification. Essentially, Zelly12 denotes a classification or cross first and then a specific clone of that cross second. It seems others are simply naming their individual specimens/clones without necessarily getting more specific than that. The same thing happens in Hemerocallis. You get some people that will list the parents of a particular named seedling, others will simply list one parent, or sometimes no parents are listed as the parents were unknown or unregistered seedlings themselves. The exact species involved in many complex named hybrids is often unknown. This is true whether your talking about Hemerocallis, Brugansia, cacti, etc. 

 

Now, for me, I would like to think that when I get a named clone that the clone is indeed what it being sold as. I also like to think that the clone is superior in some form or fashion to others I might already have in my collection. What makes a clone worth keeping or naming? What makes a particular cross such as Zelly a cross worth naming? For me, Zelly hybrids having spectacularly colored flowers is definitely something I look forward to when I grow a Zelly seed. I know that cross is tried and true. I have high expectations of getting that colored flower from that particular cross.

 

With that being said, I have a beautiful Trichocereus scopulicola x Trichocereus terscheckii5af23a8917cd2_scopulicolaxterscheckii14-10.thumb.jpg.f3a199024ec14d6e5f7132ea3de7639c.jpg that while quite small is already getting its 10th rib to grow in. Now, for me... I love that given many of my other seedlings from that same cross that are the same size have 8 or even less ribs. Now, am I going to give up on my other specimens and simply name this one that I think is so special? Not at all. I am going to watch and wait and see if the others will develop more ribs in time. With that being said, I like a plethora of ribs as I can't see ever having too many of them. So, chances are I'll be keeping this one for the long haul if the others don't keep up and getting rid of the rest. Perhaps one day it will prove itself worthy of a name, but chances are someone somewhere else has grown one that is just as good looking or even better already from the same cross. So, perhaps in the end this seedling might only be good enough to warrant being the parent of another great hybrid seedling that itself is also not worthy of a name. The resulting progeny will then have parents that do not have names, but perhaps one of the many seedlings produced will be worthy of a name itself... one never knows. 

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So can i name my own cross of cacti anything i want?

eg  Eileen x Bunnings Brig.

 

I call it "Smushroomed 6"

 

If i had seeds:P

 

I might soon..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nah haha

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1 hour ago, mole said:

So can i name my own cross of cacti anything i want?

eg  Eileen x Bunnings Brig.

 

fer sure mate, you can name your hybrids anything you want.....but it would probably be a good idea to wait until they flower & you start making crosses from them

 

naming is one thing, getting world wide recognition of that name is another thing..

 

as for names, I'd recommend as short as possible, unless of course you enjoy writing them out hundreds if not thousands of times.... :)

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4 hours ago, zelly said:

 

fer sure mate, you can name your hybrids anything you want.....but it would probably be a good idea to wait until they flower & you start making crosses from them

 

naming is one thing, getting world wide recognition of that name is another thing..

 

as for names, I'd recommend as short as possible, unless of course you enjoy writing them out hundreds if not thousands of times.... :)

It goes a little like this....

 

No one can stop you from naming a seedling you have raised.

 

No one can stop you from naming a specimen you have discovered in the wild that has not been named already.

 

No  one can stop you from naming a specimen found in a nursery or someone's back yard....

 

However, as Zelly has noted, just because you name a specimen does not mean that  others will necessarily think your specimen is worth keeping. 

 

The name Brugmansia cubensis actually refers to crosses that involve 3 different species. Brugmansia aurea x B. suaveolens x B. versicolor. A name was given to a triple cross so to speak.

 

Brugmansia candida is a name given to any cross of B. aurea x B. versicolor. 

 

Now, are all Brugmansia candida or Brugmansia cubensis equally beautiful or equally hardy? Are they all deserving of a name? Well, they all get the name B. cubensis or B. candida regardless of what we think of them.

 

Now, Zelly has created the similar situation with his Zelly hybrids as we see above with Brugmansia candida and Brugmansia cubensis.  Zelly is the first one to make zelly cross (scop x vrg grandiflorus) to my knowledge. Just like the box of chocolate crosses with Datura... the fellow who first made that cross made the distinction that all such crosses would be B.O.C. hybrids. The name stuck in both cases.

 

I love seeing new hybrids and new names, but just because I see a newly named hybrid does not mean I'm going to rush out and try to acquire one. I love some of the BOC hybrids I've seen with their bright yellow and purple streaks. Others... just appear muddy to me. Yet, they are all BOC hybrids recognized around the world by those that collect Datura. For myself, when I was actively hybridizing Brugmansia I would grow out upwards of 10,000 seedlings to maturity in a single year and keep a mere handful of them for further evaluation. Still, I've seen others grow out a few hundred or even less of a hybrid and name several out of the cross. I'm not knocking those that can do that... great genetics often breeds great things. And an ill conceived cross is often doomed to failure from the start. 

 

Now, if I've confused you. Let me clarify by saying I think it is a wonderful thing to have a working name or numbering system for your hybrids. It allows you to keep track and take note of important things down the road if you plan on breeding. Perhaps you note that the body type generally comes from the mother, but with this one special pollen donor terscheckii the father can actually play a significant role in the body type of those seedlings on occasion. That is something to take note of. If you note that the pollen donor throws out especially fat specimens or especially long spines in its seedlings regardless of the mom... Now, I am going off on a tangent and I've probably lost at least a few of you so I'll stop right here.

 

Hope this helps clarify my thoughts on the matter, not that my opinion or anyone else's opinion matters when it comes to choosing to name your specimen or not. I wholeheartedly believe anyone has the right to name their cacti whatever they wish to name it. if the name catches on and your specimen travels the world... great. If your specimen lives and dies in your back yard... again... great. There is no rule that a named specimen has to be popular or gain notoriety. As we have all seen, many specimens that once had notoriety often fall by the way side if enough years have passed and enough improvements have been made to make that old hybrid obsolete. One need only look at some of the first crosses done with Hemerocallis and those crosses we see today to see the truth in that statement. 

 

Again, my apologies for running amuck with my thoughts. If I've derailed your ability to comprehend where I am going with this then my job is truly done.:bootyshake:

 

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Seeing you get into Brugmansia Inyan

 

One of my mums Brugmansia trees

Brugsy.thumb.jpg.08a18da6923a3c7c3922015a50f7457c.jpg

 

Cheers

 

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18 minutes ago, mole said:

Seeing you get into Brugmansia Inyan

 

One of my mums Brugmansia trees

Brugsy.thumb.jpg.08a18da6923a3c7c3922015a50f7457c.jpg

 

Cheers

 

Here is a hybrid made from one of my old hybrids... for me, seeing others use one of my old hybrids to create a new and improved specimen like this is truly humbling and at the same time it fills you with a little pride to see that your hybrid will go on...as its progeny are used for future crosses. 

 

That is what its all about for me really, trying to create or grow an improvement from seed and then watching as that creation becomes obsolete as others use that seedling to improve on their own goals and before you know it... your seedling is just a memory that exists as a small part of the lineage of a whole new line if your lucky.  

 

Your mums Brugmansia has strong B. versicolor influence. You can get some spectacular flowers from that one, but you will have to grow out at least 200-300 seedlings to get something worth keeping.

 

FruitSalad26.jpg

Edited by Inyan

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Some additional pachanoi you might want to include in the list: Huarazensis, KK339, Kimura’s Giant, MT03 Woody, MT06 Lupita, Saquarema, Zeus.

Edited by Wile E. Peyote

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Helon is not super pedro, its a scop/cordo hybrid with monstose traits, this sets this plant apart from scops and super pedro, both of which usually dont have mostrose traits.

The only cordo i know of in aus with mostrose traits is wolunda monster pedro.

i can trace the Helon (with records) plant back to 1975, can this be done with wolunda monster pedro......

We named Helon, Helon for various reasons and with the spelling Helon so there is no confusion with the US bridgesii clone Helen.

Hulk is another distinct scop type, if you have this clone then you know its different than a normal scop or a cordobensis.

very important when finding old plants that the history is established, their origins, the year planted etc...... So much valuable information can be gleaned from old gardens and their owners.

facebook, forums, vendors etc...... useful in some ways but the real stories are at the old gardens.

Theres many clone lists online.

 

 

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