Jump to content
The Corroboree
  • 0
Sign in to follow this  
fyzygy

Acacia phlebophylla seedling surprises

Question

A few different hybrids (???) all from the same batch of seed (as shown in black pots). This batch germinated *much faster* than previous year's (pink pot). Pink pot is 1 year older than black. But all from identical source plant/s.

The "hybrids" batch started sprouting in the fridge after only a few weeks, whereas the previous batch hadn't even after several months. Of the new batch, one pair of obvious hybrids grew so fast they had to leave the greenhouse early (super-long phyllodes, pictured at front and right). 
The two at the back resemble more the one in the pink pot, in terms of colour, shape, growth rate.

The small pot in the centre holds a few stragglers, could be something different again. 

 

 

 

 

 

this.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Those with the super-long phyllodes certainly look like hybrids.

Any idea what species might be involved ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

A. longifolia was the seed supplier's best guess. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Amazing. So I imagine that the seed came from a mature horticultural specimen rather than wild.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Seed came via Cactilicious cultivated specimens. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

 DSC08211.thumb.jpg.8080830b1ca9c0505d9529dde30ff88d.jpgHere's a close-up of one of the "truer-to-type" phyllodes ...

Edited by fyzygy
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
8 hours ago, fyzygy said:

Seed came via Cactilicious cultivated specimens. 

Hey mine too, had 2/4 germinate, yet one died off early. Left with one that is growing strong. Although yours looks much bigger than mine, you must be doing something right :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

i think fresh seed germinates faster than, older and not well stored seeds.

 

this post thought me that acacias do form hybreeds readily, this is exciting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Mulga's (2002) cultivation notes for Acacia phlebophylla

 

Found naturally only on exposed granite slopes high up Mt Buffalo in Vic, a rare and endangered species.
Likes well drained coarse gravel sand mix. Likes full sun, especially once established. Likes water but fungus sensitive so periodic drying out ok, can be grown under cover in high rainfall areas. Can handle exposed conditions, cold, including frosts and snow, bushfires and hot summers and intense light.
Seeds can be germinated by scarification of the seed, and them soaked in water for a few hours, until the seed swells and then placed in a germinating medium and kept moist, may take up to a month (or even a few) for them to germinate, longer than many other acacias. Other factors such as cold temperatures or bushfires might also affect the germination process in the wild.
seed3.jpgUnder cultivation they may grow bigger and live longer than in the wild, no need for high nitrogen fertilisers, a granite/ rock dust slow release fertilisers seems good, maintains good drainage. Acacias in the wild and cultivated are found to have a symbiotic relationship with certain rhizobium bacteria that form nodules on the roots and fix nitrogen to the soil. For plants grown outside Australia or in sterile mediums from seed it may be necesary to inoculate the soil or medium with rhizobium culture, which is available commercially for Australian acacias, for the plant to succeed past seedling stage.
Pruning dead branches will prolong life, pruning generally will promote flowering and foliage growth in most acacias, producing bushier plants and if old enough more flowers. They can probably cope with pruning quite well, depending on age and health, pruning to remove borers and galls will assist the plants health anyway.
For not so well drained areas plants can probably be planted out on small 'rock' hills, say 0.5 to 1.5m high pile of broken rock (granite or similar type of rock) and maybe some soil mix and rock dust between and then the seedlings planted out on them. Healthy established plants would be best for this. May be able to grow as a pot plant in a large pot, use a similar mix and prune to maintain size, can move for sunlight and warmth, indoors if necesary for extreme winters but can handle quite cold conditions.
Can grow from 2-4 m high, rarely as a small tree, more common as multistemmed shrub in the wild. Flowers in Sep-Oct (Spring) in it's natural habitat, seeds mature in pods Dec-Jan (Summer) in natural habitat.

 

https://web.archive.org/web/20070314154331fw_/http://mulga.yage.net/acacia/index.html

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×