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Brace yourselves! Winters coming!

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Stop your watering, protect your plants, have patience, They will grow again!

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Winters coming??? Tomorrow is midwinter, winter solstice. Time to break out the party hats, the days are gonna start getting longer :)

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yes boss, i stopped watering weeks ago, buttons anyway, trichs cop the full weather all year.

Edited by micoz

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Where I live it gets down to about minus one degree C. About two weeks ago I looked at the temp at 8.30 in the morning and it said minus two.

Since then some of my bridgesii are suffering. A pup on kai split open and now has black rot there. HBO6 split.One Eileen as well. A Con and a SAB bridge too.

The rest are coping fine. I'm in the mountains at 30 degrees so it still gets warm sun at this time of the year.I only started getting into Trichocereus sp. end of last year so they range in size from about eight inches to a foot and a half. They are all in the ground.

I'm inclined to do nothing and see if they'll get over it. Right idea or wrong?

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I just had a look at the pup on Kai and can see some fresh green growth in the center so I think it's going to be okay. Perhaps the skin is thinner on a young pup?

Kai with the exception of the pup, Jess and Penis plant were the three bridgesii in my garden that showed no frost damage.

I think Kai and Tig are the fastest growers as well.

HB06 does not like the cold here.I still think it will get through the winter though.

HBO5 is going well so no offence to herbalistics.

HBO6 was the only Trichocereus that got black spot after the rain earlier on this year.

I read on these forums that putting a dab of honey on it was worth a go.

It sure healed up quick. That might be genetics however.

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If you live in a really cold frosty climate, and you know you're in for an overnight freeze, put a polystyrene cup over the tips of your cacti to protect them.

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pics??

i would say do nothing is the right idea, particularly with bridgesii, its not uncommon for bridgesii to break out a few black spots, they always come good.

not sure about the splitting though, my guys cop full weather all year and i rarely have a problem with splitting,they are all in pots though.

I had minus 2 night before last with no dramas.

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I've heard the trichos can tolerate some pretty damn cold conditions once fully established, the polystyrene cup on the growing tip is an excellent tip I've heard recommended a few times!

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Trichos must be able to handle cold weather pretty well. The big three cactus gardens where heaps of the Aussie plants originate, (Dawsons, Fields and Cactus Country), are all in an area where it regularly goes below 0c and gets frosts.

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I think they were affected because the weather had been so mild before the cold snap.

I had a look at them a day after that cold night and the tips on some of them the skin had gone rough looking and yellowish. The worst affected ones mentioned the tips started to divide up into smaller segments. There were cracks between the segments that formed over the next 2weeks becoming deeper.

I am up 900 meters and the day after that bad frost they received early morning to midday sun.

I'm thinking the combination of frost - the first one of the year and sun on the frozen tips burnt them. I'm pretty sure they'll get over it.

Sounds like a good idea with the polystyrene cups to insulate the tips.

I can take pics but can't post them because my solar batteries have died recently. So all I have is my phone for the internet.

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A little bit of water to defrost your plants before the sun hits them will help in the future.

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Thanks Dooligar. I'll give it a go next.

The little green spot on Kai has turned into a fresh green patch. The others are greening up on the tips also.

SAB bridgesii has given birth to a third pup up the stem a bit.

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I've been trialling frost cloth...seems to be working very well

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Bridgesii have it by far the worst in my garden. Although the others don't hesitate to rot too.post-903-0-86828200-1435147885_thumb.jpgpost-903-0-43386900-1435147915_thumb.jpg

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God damn I hate winter!

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Slow release potassium; Sulphate of Potash can be used in late Autumn to prepare the plant for the coming cold (also applies for the Summer heat) to give it a better chance of protection as Potassium is associated with temperature control (among other major activities).

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Although this weather is great for cuddling :D

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Slow release potassium; Sulphate of Potash can be used in late Autumn to prepare the plant for the coming cold (also applies for the Summer heat) to give it a better chance of protection as Potassium is associated with temperature control (among other major activities).

I think you may be referring to silica? most commonly found for us in the form Potassium silicate? Great for strengthening cells, I have been told about it's use in the nursery industry for frost protection.

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Nope. Potassium.

EDIT: Sorry, I did not read that properly. Potassium silicate would be the best for sure! :)

Greater frost damage in K-deficient plants is related to water deficiency from the chilling-induced inhibition of water uptake and freezing-induced cellular dehydration [95]. A significant negative correlation was found between frost damage and leaf K concentration, and an adequate K supply can effectively increase frost resistance [6,8].

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3645691/

Edited by _Cursive

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