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BrownDog

Leggy (Etoliated ?) Seedlings

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About a year ago, I started the addictive process of growing cacti from seed.  For my first test, learning batch, I sowed a bunch of Zelly's red and yellow T. grandis in a take away tub.  They sprouted nicely, grew up and in the Spring (N. California), I transplanted them into 2" pots to fill out and harden off.

 

They grew well and are now healthy, happy little plants but the lower stems are quite slim and red colored compared with the tops:

 

little_grandis_(1).thumb.jpg.da93c49a37d84cf4336190cd35a03be5.jpg

 

I've already accidentally broken one off and am trying to root it again in a new pots.  I also have more varieties going now, some with similar growth patterns.I am interested in what more experienced growers do with plants like this.

 

I could transplant them into bigger pots and have the final soil layer end up where they get wider and greener.  This seems like a possible invitation for rot to take up residence, but I've read of folks planting an entire grafted Trich, Pereskiopsis and all so maybe that's an unfounded worry.

 

I could cut them off, dry them and root them but that would presumably set the growth back quite a bit.

 

What would y'all do with little ones like this?

 

 

Thanks!

 

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Even cuts get buried like 50mm deep man (2inches), sometimes more...
I don't know if cutting the wide green growth off and drying/rooting is necessary man, but I'm not hugely experienced.

I'd just do what you suggested and bury the thinner redder material, with soil line up to the wide desired part.
Good luck mate, let us know how it works out in a few months time :)

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Red discoloration is often a sign of stress. In this case, I don´t think it´s a problem though. Some species have a higher tendency to produce a reddish discoloration at the base and apart from that the plants look very healthy. Trichocereus grandiflorus has a different shape than other Trichocereus species, what explains the slightly odd shape too. These look pretty good as far as I am concerned. 

Edited by Evil Genius
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4 hours ago, BrownDog said:

I could transplant them into bigger pots and have the final soil layer end up where they get wider and greener. 

 

I do what you've described above.

 

I make a top layer about half an inch deep out of something inert, like zeolite, or very small pebbles, above my normal soil mix where the roots are. It holds the stem until it thickens up, but isn't too organic in the hopes of lowering the chance of rotting. I have never had a seedling rot from doing it this way before.

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Thanks for the input.  I leaned toward just planting them deeper - it just seemed the right thing to do - and I'm happy get more expert confirmation.

 

 

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On 8/8/2017 at 10:06 PM, BrownDog said:

 I leaned toward just planting them deeper - it just seemed the right thing to do

I'm with you 100% on planting them a little deeper as well. That red color often comes from growing them in full sun which is exactly how I try to grow most of my Trichocereus seedlings. I don't have to worry about sun burn that way as there is no transition from shade to full sun when you simply start them in full sun. You can see that red color stops very soon after grafting as the seedlings can be pushed a bit harder a lot sooner by the stock plant. I get excited anytime I see someone planting seeds and growing up specimens. Starting with some of Zelly's  hybrids I can't imagine you aren't elated as well. Back to your planting your cuttings a little deeper... I've done the same with my Trichocereus, B. cappi vines, Brugmansia, and tomato plants and they all seem to benefit from it. Not to say that all plants benefit from that treatment, but those ones in particular seem to benefit from it for me.

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Thusfar, all the deep transplants survived and thrived.  None have yet succumbed to anything wet and weird.  I hope to get another month or two of growth out of them in the warm Fall and unheated greenhouse - more of a greenroom really.  Here's a photo update:

 

IMG_4726.thumb.JPG.7a56e83efa1c93061461ba9404bdaaaa.JPG

 

 

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They are looking good, very nice job : )

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Thanks.

 

A bunch of them in the back are various Zelly crosses I'm growing, many of which are looking pretty good right now.  Lots more transplanted and stalled little ones lying in window sills too.  Addictive little hobby this.

 

I'm still figuring out the right rhythm the sowing, growing and transplanting to keep them growing without stalling.  I tried a big flat of see starting cells and that worked OK for germinating and early growth, but was a bit unwieldy and it took a lot of time to carefully transplant all the little ones.  I think I left them in the inert soil mix too long too.

 

For my latest round of @Evil Genius seeds, I used small pots, 2in / 5cm ish, with sifted cactus soil mix, pumice and some coir, sprinkling 10-15 seeds over the top then fitting 8 of them in a clear plastic take away tub in a window sill.  I intend to leave them undisturbed as long as they continue to grow and look healthy.  This is my favorite approach so far.

 

takeaway_02.thumb.JPG.cf6c74ebea53848a9ee0ab77aef669aa.JPG

 

 

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On ‎28‎/‎09‎/‎2017 at 8:20 AM, BrownDog said:

Addictive little hobby this

I sometimes feel like i am a servant to the cacti gods : )

You have the passion

 

 

passion 1.png

passion.png

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On 28.9.2017 at 5:20 PM, BrownDog said:

Thanks.

 

A bunch of them in the back are various Zelly crosses I'm growing, many of which are looking pretty good right now.  Lots more transplanted and stalled little ones lying in window sills too.  Addictive little hobby this.

 

I'm still figuring out the right rhythm the sowing, growing and transplanting to keep them growing without stalling.  I tried a big flat of see starting cells and that worked OK for germinating and early growth, but was a bit unwieldy and it took a lot of time to carefully transplant all the little ones.  I think I left them in the inert soil mix too long too.

 

For my latest round of @Evil Genius seeds, I used small pots, 2in / 5cm ish, with sifted cactus soil mix, pumice and some coir, sprinkling 10-15 seeds over the top then fitting 8 of them in a clear plastic take away tub in a window sill.  I intend to leave them undisturbed as long as they continue to grow and look healthy.  This is my favorite approach so far.

 

takeaway_02.thumb.JPG.cf6c74ebea53848a9ee0ab77aef669aa.JPG

 

 

I start sowing in oct. when autumn comes here in europe. I use the following approach, documented in the pics.

Then let them germinate at around 25 celsius.

Transplant them after 6 month in spring, distance between plants like one to 2 fingers wide in other boxes. See pics. A lot of work.

Then let them inside for 3-4 weeks and put them outside in may, when its warm and sunny here in europe.

The following spring they come in the ground.

IMG_20170928_183253.jpg

IMG_20170928_182858.jpg

IMG_20170928_190854.jpg

IMG_20170929_130130.jpg

IMG_20170929_134653.jpg

IMG_20170921_143743.jpg

IMG_20170921_143853.jpg

IMG_20170527_103537.jpg

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17 hours ago, Pedropark said:

I start sowing in oct. when autumn comes here in europe. I use the following approach, documented in the pics.

Then let them germinate at around 25 celsius.

Transplant them after 6 month in spring, distance between plants like one to 2 fingers wide in other boxes. See pics. A lot of work.

Then let them inside for 3-4 weeks and put them outside in may, when its warm and sunny here in europe.

The following spring they come in the ground.

IMG_20170928_183253.jpg

IMG_20170928_182858.jpg

IMG_20170928_190854.jpg

IMG_20170929_130130.jpg

IMG_20170929_134653.jpg

IMG_20170921_143743.jpg

IMG_20170921_143853.jpg

IMG_20170527_103537.jpg

 

 

Thanks for that.  I appreciate seeing the whole process and time line laid out like that.  You do lovely work.

 

 

 

 

 

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23 hours ago, bardo said:

I sometimes feel like i am a servant to the cacti gods : )

You have the passion

 

 

passion 1.png

passion.png

 

Heh - I looked around at them all over the weekend and wondered "what have I done?"

 

At least they are hardy plants and can survive a couple of weeks without water, unlike tomatoes etc which I gave up so I can vacation with impunity.

 

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17 hours ago, BrownDog said:

Heh - I looked around at them all over the weekend and wondered "what have I done?"

 

At least they are hardy plants and can survive a couple of weeks without water, unlike tomatoes etc which I gave up so I can vacation with impunity.

 

Lol, there is a fine line between hobby and obsession.

I have decided to mainly focus on growing hardy things cause things can quickly get out of hand especially during a persistent heat wave, it can be a burden growing things that don't go well in the climate, a burden that made me revaluate what i do or do not choose to grow, for example i have largely opted out off psychotria plants for acacias, going to go for more candle nut trees and not macadamia etc

It can be exhausting trying to keep picky plants alive that don't mesh with the climate, only very special plants get my primo out of climate care services these days.

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