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The Corroboree
migraineur

Outdoor grow tip for Aussies

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Posted (edited)

Hey

 

I have discovered that certain species of fungus grow amazingly well outside in Scotts Osmocote 50L Premium Potting Mix that you can get from places like Bunnings. It's the stuff in the orange bag. 

 

I mixed spent substrate with the potting mix to use as mushroom compost. I did this in pots and in the ground. Some time later there were flushes of HUGE mushrooms.

 

I then tried using colonised grainspawn instead of spent substrate from trays just to play around. I mixed some of the grainspawn into the top layer of 30cm pots containing chillies and added some of the fresh potting mix on top. After a short period I got fruiting, including some big, fat ones from just the 30cm pots. 

 

In addition, tropical mushrooms have been growing in cold outside conditions when the aforementioned happened, However, the ones that fruited in the colder conditions were in areas where there was some sunlight which would have heated up the soil in the ground and pots. 

 

Furthermore, I really noticed how mycelium can be used to prevent erosion since it helped keep the soil together in places in my garden where water might dislodge it.

 

I hope this helps you. 

 

Cheers

Edited by migraineur
Brain doesn't work
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Have you tried mixing in (addition) some straw?

 

I'm thinking it will provide you with more bulk that's not expensive, but provide the mycelium with more of those woody fibres.

Experimenting by adding this mixture around trees/plant's root system will also be a win-win, as the mycelium and plant's roots will work together to exchange nutrients.

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Over the weekend I had the idea to try grow mushrooms outside. The write up I read talked about layers of wood chips and spawn in a raised bed, I was goons try a 1m sq bed to try grow king oysters. I literally have no exp with mushrooms other than cow poop lol. So if this sounds like a dumb idea. Please slander me lol. (SEQ climate)

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Corrugated carboard and Hessian are great for expanding spawn and ive found leap off better into substrates. This includes in-situ natural and planned/imported substrates. 

 

I spread wood blewits everywhere just using stem butts and cardboard. Lol.. Theyve depleted the natural substrate in a coupla locations. 

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Makes sense using those materials as well. I think the idea is to reduce contaminated soil in the area while the mycilium establishes. 
 

damn I need to start growing mushroom and mushies soon. But time time time... aarrgghh 

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On 09/08/2021 at 12:20 PM, waterboy 2.0 said:

Corrugated carboard and Hessian are great for expanding spawn and ive found leap off better into substrates. This includes in-situ natural and planned/imported substrates. 

 

I spread wood blewits everywhere just using stem butts and cardboard. Lol.. Theyve depleted the natural substrate in a coupla locations. 

 

want to scoop me up a bag full of blewitt media so I can try to start this in my backyard?

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@rottenjonny

Ill await them to pop up so im sure i not digging some other thing up .. Lol.. But can do. Some warmth should see em through soon. 

 

They love dogwood leaf litter, so if you can feed it something like that that doesn't go bone dry youll be on fire. There was a pure culture of my wild type floating about here a while back. 

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On 09/08/2021 at 7:12 AM, Fezza said:

Have you tried mixing in (addition) some straw?

 

I'm thinking it will provide you with more bulk that's not expensive, but provide the mycelium with more of those woody fibres.

Experimenting by adding this mixture around trees/plant's root system will also be a win-win, as the mycelium and plant's roots will work together to exchange nutrients.

 

Coir works well or mixing in mostly spent substrate from trays or monotubs. Mix that through the potting soil and you're good.

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