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Responsible Choice

Psilocybin Mushrooms of SE QLD, Australia

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3 hours ago, Responsible Choice said:

Gotta be careful what you wish for mate :wink:

 

I'm hearin' you bro. I wished for two thin girls and got one fat one.

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Awesome pics, RC. A veritable microscopy paradise you got right there.

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I've gotta dig out some old photo prints and scan them, had some epic hauls. Stay tuned...

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This thread has been rather quiet this season, I hope everyone is doing well, and having a happy new year :D

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We are indeed mate. Flick back a page and you'll find there has been a bit of action late last year :wink:

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If you have ever considered getting out amongst it for a bit of a forage, now is the time. SE QLD is underwater and humid as, so say hello to my little friends! :lol:

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A few cubes and pans around this morning, but still a bit too wet I'm afraid...

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There's been some good rain around SEQ in the last week - is it too late in the year for our fungal friends to come out and say hello?

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There may be some here and there for the intrepid explorer, but the current soil temps, and generally fairly low humidity, would make me tend to believe we won't see them en masse until the sun returns. :wink:

 

Check this post I made on pg 3 of this thread, about three-quarters of the page down, that has a few hints and tips mate:

 

At the request of a fellow SABer I have bumped this thread and listed a couple of useful hints as far as wild finds go on the Sunny Coast.

NOTE: This may or may not apply to any other parts of SE QLD.

In my limited experience first flushes won't occur unless the following criteria are met:

  • Base soil temps of 26C plus.
  • 80% humidity or more (ideally 100%) combined with AT LEAST 50 - 100 mm of rain in a 24 hour period (the more the better)
  • Regular decent rainfall following significant falls with humidity remaining 75% or more
  • Grassy pastures that are super green
  • HEAPS 'o COW POO

If you find yourself in the right place at the right time, with the above conditions having occurred within the last few days, try to look for the following environments:

  • grazing land with good sized herds of beef cattle (20+)
  • gently sloping/rolling hills with heavily treed fence lines (camphors seem to be pretty good)
  • areas where cattle regularly gather, either to wait for feeding or to be lead into another pasture.
  • south facing slopes, or pastures that only get morning or afternoon sun
  • reasonably long grass - tufty or not (recently heavily grazed pastures are usually stomped and the poo is too fresh)
  • shady copses and/or streams rivers that run through/alongside said pastures

Cyans tend to flush first, but can prove difficult to ID, despite the fact that some believe they bruise blue instantly - THEY DON'T NECESSARILY. Pinch a stem and check it again after 5 mins or so to check for inking. Alternatively leave them alone until they age a day (unless it is 40C in full sun, because they will be fried), in which case they take on a bluish tinge anyway. Black spore prints are easy to obtain by putting a cap gills down on paper overnight with a glass jar over it.

Cubes flush later and have a MUCH longer run generally, although cyans can flush again, but half-heartedly in my experience. ID cubes by looking for the very quick on set of blue-green staining of broken stems, and the beautiful orange to golden yellow cap. Be wary though, I have spotted a couple of imposters which I really should've taken a pic of. Heavy dews will keep them popping up in the absence of rain. Deep purple spore print.

If you must remove a sample do so with a sharp knife or scissors, as this increases the likelihood of repeat fruiting.

Watch out for bulls and quad bike riding, banjo-playing, shotgun-wielding farmers. :blink:

Lastly, on the topic of ID'ing, MAKE SURE YOU TAKE GOOD PHOTOS AND A SPORE PRINT TO OFFER UP ON THE FORUM FOR SOME SOLID IDs.

Hope that helps mate, and please feel free to add/contradict/troll this post to further aid fellow fungal foragers. :wink:

 

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After much rain it is with great pleasure that I hereby announce Pan season open! Pics to come... :lol:

 

Over the next week or so, as the water drains away and the sun comes out, we should see a bit more action underfoot. To the fields!!

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34 minutes ago, Responsible Choice said:

After much rain it is with great pleasure that I hereby announce Pan season open! Pics to come... :lol:

 

Over the next week or so, as the water drains away and the sun comes out, we should see a bit more action underfoot. To the fields!!

 

 

Yew!!!!!!

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Fuck, the season will be on here soon too with all this rain. Have to dig out some old treasure maps...

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ID please... :rolleyes:

 

zvo9kj.jpg

 

 

Edited by Responsible Choice
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Hey hey everyone,Im new to hunting and all but is it true you will have more luck finding cubes if you are within a 100km radius to the coastal side then more inland? I plan on doing a small hunt this weekend but not sure if I should do a drive to the Brisbane fields or have a scout around my areas first.thanks.

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Mate I reckon the hinterland is the go, simply because you're more likely to find large herds of cattle. As far as cubes go I'm unsure as far as their general proliferation relative to the coast, but the greener the grass and the more cows there are, with a few shady trees chucked in, the better. :wink:

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Focus on hillsides with a southern or south east aspect.

Avoid pastures that have had superphosphate applied, this kills mycelium. Fencelines with trees are always worth a look.

Make friends with dairy farmers' daughters!

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5 hours ago, Buddha Time said:

Hey hey everyone,Im new to hunting and all but is it true you will have more luck finding cubes if you are within a 100km radius to the coastal side then more inland? I plan on doing a small hunt this weekend but not sure if I should do a drive to the Brisbane fields or have a scout around my areas first.thanks.

The rainfall is more likely to occur on the eastern side of the hinterlands. Rainfall = cubes

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Very wet in the normal hunting grounds and also the very public one near home, had waterlogged what resembled Pans, but totally done in, the normal hunting grounds also had water bubbling like a spring from the ground, once the sun is out and all the rainfall - cubes and pans should be appear

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Thanks dudes,with this new knowledge it will be a bit easier to spot some of these bad boys out, hopefully.

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Soil temps are only just this week going to be hitting that +20 to 22 degrees C sweet spot. :o

 

Any decent (50mm+) rainfall in the coming weeks should see any foraging efforts well rewarded :wink:

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I cant wait :) worth putting up with the heat for the cubes.

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On 16/10/2018 at 8:25 PM, Glaukus said:

Focus on hillsides with a southern or south east aspect.

Avoid pastures that have had superphosphate applied, this kills mycelium. Fencelines with trees are always worth a look.

Make friends with dairy farmers' daughters!

 Not only do dairy farmers daughters have access to the pastures... Their milking technique is also very handy

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Rainfall has been highly localised and barely enough, but just enough for a handful. We need a good down pour over a few days and it should be right mate :wink:

Edited by Responsible Choice

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Heavy rain forecast across the weekend!! Next week should be the business :shroomer:

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