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Silky purple-flag, Patersonia sericea ..

 

Yum yum..

patersonia_sericea.jpg

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Winter apple, Eremophila debilis

According to the book plants of central queensland by eric anderson the ripe fruit is good bush tucker also reported to have been used by the Aborigines against venereal diseases. States it is mildly bitter, i found them fairly pleasant and slightly sweet

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Gahnia specie, i think it is Aspera or maybe seiberana

I have read it has edible starch in the leaf bases and the seeds are edible, i have been meaning to experiment with it for a while now, going to try pound some into flour and make a little cake with it to try out.

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I believe this is some kind of solanum / wild tomato, there is a couple different types that grow around where i am, some have spines.

Some types were eaten by Aborigines but have read some are poisonous and even the edible ones can cause illness when eaten in large amounts. 

Not to keen on experimenting or trying any of the wild solanum plants unless someone with greater knowledge was present.

Edited by bardo
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Australian bugle, Ajuga australis

A pretty plant, they are not flowering atm but they have nice purple flowers, could be a nice ornamental.

Have read the Aborigines used to bath sores and boils with an infusion of the bruised plant in hot water

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Seed pods starting to form on Acacia acuminata broad phyllode. I will be collecting seed from my plantation and another stand of jam for this years giveaway. Forum only. Keep an eye out :)

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Some more photos of native cherry,  Exocarpuos specie i believe to be cupressiformis, i find the after taste to be not so pleasant but i still nibble on the fruits from time to time.

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Some more info

Aboriginal medicinal heritage

Australian Aborigines consumed the “berries” and used other parts of the native cherry as medicine. For example, the twigs of native cherry were used as bitter tonic and astringent [2]. The stem bark contains about 22 % tannin which is likely responsible for the astringent properties. The stems and old branches of the tree were further found to contain exocarpic acid [3].

https://herbaethylacini.com.au/exocarpos-cupressiformis-native-cherry/

 

Uses

Indigenous Australias used the wood of the plant to make spearthrowers as well as bull roarers.[11]

The pale wood is very fine-grained with little figure but often striking colour variation. The timber was historically used for making furniture, gun-stocks, and tool handles.[2][5] It is also suitable for carving and turning and so is also now used for producing decorative and ornamental pieces of art-work in the Arts and Crafts industries.[2]

The fleshy pedicel, the "cherry", is edible and so was used as food by indigenous Australians and by early European settlers. The "fruit" is picked when it is so ripe it is ready to fall from the tree. It may be eaten raw, or cooked.[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exocarpos_cupressiformis

 

 

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3 hours ago, bardo said:

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Gahnia specie, i think it is Aspera or maybe seiberana

I have read it has edible starch in the leaf bases and the seeds are edible, i have been meaning to experiment with it for a while now, going to try pound some into flour and make a little cake with it to try out.

Likely G. aspera - seiberiana is big, up to 3m. Nuts for aspera:

nut broad-ovoid to globose, 4.5–6.0 mm long, 2.5–4.0 mm diam., dark red-brown, shining

 

Nuts for seiberiana:

Nut 2.5–4.0 mm long

 

Although for NSW - probably helpful to check out:

http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=gn&name=Gahnia

 

 

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Walking stick palm - Linospadix monostachya

 

This plant is an eye catcher and drew me in on my last bush walk, i thought it was poisonous from erroneous info but i have found out the fruits are edible,  i am going back for a walk tomorrow with hopes of maybe getting a few seeds and try grow some in pots.

Will look for some other interesting native plants to take pics of when i am out there.

 

 

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Native mint, mentha australis i believe

Not looking as vibrant as usual but with the rain and warm weather they should be cranking with new growth all over the place.

Has a super nice minty smell, has seeds atm so if anyone wants some let me know and i will collect some :  )

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Found this tree at the bunya mountains, not sure what it is yet, anyone have any ideas ?

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Pretty sure this is some kind of lilly pilly tho not sure what variety ? was also found at the bunya mountains.

Will try pinpoint the type another day

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6 hours ago, bardo said:

Found this tree at the bunya mountains, not sure what it is yet, anyone have any ideas ?

2017-06-18_10_59_36.thumb.jpg.b654f19e67f9bfae3181f214193f7943.jpg2017-06-18_10_59_52.thumb.jpg.df5b233249e6682590f325044f21367c.jpg2017-06-18_10_59_58.thumb.jpg.58751c084433369a79e37c714b7e50f2.jpg2017-06-18_11_00_09.thumb.jpg.78f7d6e18059699a75d26dc927dc8a7c.jpg

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Pittorsporum undulatum - Wavy-leaved or Sweet Pittosporum or Native Daphne..

 

http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Pittosporum~undulatum

 

There is an amazing app for ID of rainforest plants - "Rainforest Plants of Australia - Rockhampton to Victoria" costs close to $50 (most expensive app I have ever purchased) - but absolutely worth it.. I think it contains data on a couple of thousand species and is updated.. You can enter visible features and the app narrows down the ID.. I use it every time I am in the scrub..

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6 hours ago, bardo said:

2017-06-18_10_56_24.thumb.jpg.c118738402fba49834a0bd107e6c6988.jpg2017-06-18_10_56_38.thumb.jpg.007457b6b8c374f6bb8a3ce2d9fe79c4.jpg2017-06-18_10_57_00.thumb.jpg.f492cad9c4cc5ab734844c58372a29be.jpg

 

Pretty sure this is some kind of lilly pilly tho not sure what variety ? was also found at the bunya mountains.

Will try pinpoint the type another day

Shots a bit blurry - but prob Blue Lilly Pilly, Syzygium oleosum.

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Diploglottis australis - native tamarind 

Edible fruit

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Edited by bardo
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Giant stinging tree - Dendrocnide excelsa

Pink edible fruits, caution of stinging hairs

 

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Edited by bardo
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I believe this is Cunjevoi - Alocasia macrorrhizos

Wild food plants by Tim Low states The cunjevoi is one of the most dangerously poisonous of australian plants, and children have died from nibbling the leaves and stems.

The rhizomes, though poisonous, are very starchy, and aborigines soaked and baked them to remove the toxin. 

 

Settler Tom Petrie noted that rhizomes were soaked lengthily, pounded, made into cakes and roasted. 

 

According to another report bulbs were scraped, baked, pounded and baked again, the process being repeated 8 or 10 times.

 

Aborigines no longer harvest this dangerous plant.

 

Sounds like a pain in the ass for a bit of tucker.

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On 10/10/2018 at 12:24 PM, bardo said:

Found this tree at the bunya mountains, not sure what it is yet, anyone have any ideas ?

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Crush the leaves in some water and you'll get quality bush soap

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Awesome, thanks for the info MooseZeus :  )

 

Edited by bardo

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Native olive - Olea paniculata

I should have taken some pics of the fruits as there was many all over the ground, not sure of the edibility or uses of these ? if anyone has info about them would like to hear what you know :  )

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strangler fig - ficus watkinsiana

Beautiful and amazing long lived tree with edible fruit

 

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Some immature fruits 

 

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Native plantain

 

edible leaves, the seeds when wet turn into a jelly/mucilage and used as a traditional herbal cure for constipation.

Apparently when eating the dry seeds they swell in the stomach and add bulk to faeces.

Colonists in NSW made "sago" puddings by adding boiling water and sugar to the seeds

 

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1 minute ago, bardo said:

Native plantain

 

edible leaves, the seeds when wet turn into a jelly/mucilage and used as a traditional herbal cure for constipation.

Apparently when eating the dry seeds they swell in the stomach and add bulk to faeces.

Colonists in NSW made "sago" puddings by adding boiling water and sugar to the seeds

 

2020-01-08_16_08_44.thumb.jpg.ea79259fb0f40df9b586273441e26264.jpg

 

 

Apparently, its useful at extracting poison from wounds when mashed up and wrapped around cuts or open wounds and does the same internally (Apparently) 

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Duboisia hopwoodii x Duboisia myoporoides  (cultivated)

 

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Does anyone have any book suggestions for ID'ing native plans as edibles or medicinal? :lol:

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