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Justler

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Everything posted by Justler

  1. I'll take number 7 and 8. I can pick up on Sunday Beautiful Cacit, and amazing prices.
  2. Justler

    Breeding Psychotria

    When I first heard about it (probably around march/april) I was under the impression that it had only recently made it's way to Oz. I guess the season for growth was also coming to an end at that time. I guess it just needs some time before it starts spreading.
  3. Justler

    Breeding Psychotria

    I've heard of a PV plant that requires 6 leaves for an "intense" brew, also from reputable sources. Also in Australia. Have not seen the plant myself, nor have access to it unfortunately. Not sure if its the same "White Princess", but it could very well be.
  4. Justler

    Giant pumpkin contest!!

    Look, I feel one of you lads has hijacked my mail and ninja'd my seeds. Im guessing it's because you fear my amazing growing techniques, which I can understand Either that, or the douche I bought them from on ebay is taking his/her sweet time. I haven't given up hope yet..... I've got this!
  5. Justler

    Meet up: Sydney, Central Coast, Newcastle

    Awesome DP Elliot. I'm always keen for a meet
  6. Justler

    Giant pumpkin contest!!

    Thanks for the offer waterboy, but I'm all sorted. I just purchased 25 from ebay, so if anybody needs some let me know. Happy to spread the love! PM me BigRed if you want a few more seeds to play with. Hopefully they arrive before the 1st!
  7. Justler

    Giant pumpkin contest!!

    When's the planting date? With all this smack talk, how could I resist joining the challenge.
  8. Your caapi will definitely out grow the box over the summer. By next year it will survive just fine on your balcony in single digit weather. I've had caapi growing in a pot outside under an awning this winter, and it hasn't gone dormant. Still growing (albeit slower than spring/summer), hasn't dropped any leaves, and no real sign of distress. They seem to handle our winters just fine when protected from frosts. I'd recommend sourcing a Psychotria Nexus and growing that as opposed to Viridis. Requires a lot less work and attention to keep it happy, and looks just a nice. You wouldn't need a grow box for a nexus or cappi. However the Viridis will probably require a grow box to keep it happy half of the year.
  9. Justler

    psychotria nexus seeding

    That's awesome, congrats PH!
  10. Hi wonderful people, I'm on the search for some purple corn seed for a friend. Apparently it has great anticancer properties. There use to be a store in Sydney that sold purple corn but I went there the other day and they don't have stock at present or know when they will be getting more. If anyone knows of any stores selling the corn itself that would appreciated. Happy to trade or pay Thanks,
  11. Justler

    Subs 2013

    Be there tomorrow dOOd! Haha that is awesome! So wollongong camp next in the up-coming weeks?
  12. Justler

    Looking for Purple Corn Seed

    Sorry Hillbilly I didn't check the store name. Its a little Korean market kind of store. The name isn't in English from memory. Its a store in Eastwood. Unfortunately they didn't have any in stock, nor were they aware of when/if they were getting more in. Communication was interesting as they didn't speak or understand English very well. The variety they had looked exactly like the corn in the first picture on this site http://luxirare.com/purple-corn-tacos/ . Today I struck gold in Cabramatta! I found some! However, the purple corn in Cabramatta looks different to the variety in Eastwood. The corn in Cabramatta has a red tinge to it, but it is labelled as Purple Corn. It looks like the corn on these two websites - http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120918184756.htm - https://lovingearth.net/products/32/purple-corn-extract-powder - The difference in colour might be attributed to environmental conditions when growing, harvest time, or perhaps its a different variety altogether... I'm not too sure. The product is vacuum sealed and frozen. It comes in a pack of two for $2.60. Not sure how to upload a picture of it :s . Now based on some internet research Blue Corn and Purple Corn, may be one in the same. Atleast that is suggested online at on several websites and in several articles. For example: Purple Corn - A Powerful Antioxidant (Tedesco, 2013) - http://www.naturalhealingnews.com/purple-corn-a-powerful-antioxidant/#.Uc6LwJZYCjk The article states: "Generally grown in Peru, purple corn (frequently referred to as blue corn) is one of nature’s richest sources of at least six different anthocyanin antioxidants... The Potential Health Benefits of Purple Corn (Jones, 2005) - http://cms.herbalgram.org/herbalgram/issue65/article2779.htm l The articles states: "Purple corn (frequently referred to as blue corn) is botanically the same species as regular table corn. Yet by a twist of nature, this corn produces kernels with one of the deepest shades of purple found anywhere in the plant “kingdom.” Research has shown that purple corn contains cell-protecting antioxidants with the ability to inhibit carcinogen-induced tumors in rats." Google searches for Blue Corn also result in pictures of purple corn, although there are also pictures of almost black looking corn with a blue tinge to it. The following articles however mentions differences between blue and purple corn: The color purple: Suntava launches mission to elevate purple corn to superfood status (Watson, 2013) - http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Markets/The-color-purple-Suntava-launches-mission-to-elevate-purple-corn-to-superfood-status
  13. Justler

    FREE ca$h moneyzz! (small research grant)

    "All the theories in the world won't help if you don't run an experiment. Just do it. And take good notes" Haha just saw your signature DL. Very appropriate in this thread. Love it!
  14. Justler

    FREE ca$h moneyzz! (small research grant)

    Title: Will the application of Chitosan increase alkoloid production in Enthobotanicals? Hypothesis: Yes! - Refer to post #9 in this thread more details - http://www.shaman-australis.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=34891 Basic Method (currently lacking much thought): Gather a bunch of enthobotanical seeds / cuttings. Set up two groups of X amount of <INSERT ETHNOBOTANICAL PLANTS> Ensure the same conditions apply to both plants - (water frequency, water amount, fertilisers amount, sunlight duration, soil composition etc.) Apply Chitosan to one group of plants on a regular and systematic basis (leaving the other as the control group). After X period of time, perform an extraction on both groups of plants. Analyse and compare quantity of alkoloids between the control group and Chitosan enhanced group. Report back to SAB! Note: This experiment must only be done with plants that extractions are legal! Preferably plants with interesting health benefits or other exciting qualities. Perhaps something like Calea or similar that would be legal and is known to contain alkoloids would be a great place to start. Chitosan in supplement form is available as a Fat Burner: http://www.vitaminking.com.au/fat-absorber-weight-management-liposorb-by-good-health.html http://www.vitaminking.com.au/weight-loss-supplements-fat-blocker-120-caps-by-thompson-nutrition-limited.html Evidence to suggest this may be a good experiment: Application of chitin and chitosan as elicitors of coumarins and fluoroquinolone alkaloids in Ruta graveolens L. (common rue). Orlita A, Sidwa-Gorycka M, Paszkiewicz M, Malinski E, Kumirska J, Siedlecka EM, Łojkowska E, Stepnowski P. Source Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdañsk, ul. Sobieskiego 18, PL 80-952 Gdańsk, Poland. Abstract: Common rue (Ruta graveolens L.) accumulates various types of secondary metabolites, such as coumarins furanocoumarins, acridone and quinolone alkaloids and flavonoids. Elicitation is a tool extensively used for enhancing secondary-metabolite yields. Chitin and chitosan are examples of elicitors inducing phytoalexin accumulation in plant tissue. The present paper describes the application of chitin and chitosan as potential elicitors of secondary-metabolite accumulation in R. graveolens shoots cultivated in vitro. The simple coumarins, linear furanocoumarins, dihydrofuranocoumarins and fluoroquinolone alkaloids biosynthesized in the presence of chitin and chitosan were isolated, separated and identified. There was a significant increase in the growth rate of R. graveolens shoots in the presence of either chitin or chitosan. Moreover, the results of the elicitation of coumarins and alkaloids accumulated by R. graveolens shoots in the presence of chitin and chitosan show that both compounds induced a significant increase in the concentrations of nearly all the metabolites. Adding 0.01% chitin caused the increase in the quantity (microg/g dry weight) of coumarins (pinnarin up to 116.7, rutacultin up to 287.0, bergapten up to 904.3, isopimpinelin up to 490.0, psoralen up to 522.2, xanhotoxin up to 1531.5 and rutamarin up to 133.7). The higher concentration of chitosan (0.1%) induced production of simple coumarins (pinnarin up to 116.7 and rutacultin up to 287.0), furanocoumarins (bergapten up to 904.3, isopimpinelin up to 490.0, psoralen up to 522.2, xanhotoxin up to 1531.5) and dihydrofuranocoumarins (chalepin up to 18 and rutamarin up to 133.7). Such a dramatic increase in the production of nearly all metabolites suggests that these compounds may be participating in the natural resistance mechanisms of R. graveolens. The application of chitin- and chitosan-containing media may be considered a promising prospect in the biotechnological production of xanthotoxin, isopimpinelin, psoralen, chalepin or methoxylated dictamnine derivatives. Unfortunately I don't have time, and more importantly the chemistry knowledge, experience, skills, equipment etc, to do an experiment like this justice. Certainly not to a level that would warrant a $300 investment. I hope someone likes the idea though and investigates it someday, as I'd love to know the results. This thread was a great idea Anodyne!
  15. Justler

    2013 Camping Trip - East Coast - Blue Mountains - May

    I went for a lovely stroll there about 2 weeks ago, and stumbled across one diamond in the rough. Just one. Plenty of wildlife around though! Saw an Echidna, a few Kangeroo's, a possum, some wicked birds, a even a platypus about 15 minutes drive out of the zone at a well known destination. Also stumbled accross a lovely bearded man, with a keen passion for books, and an exceptional love for plants. Seems like one of us Lovely time to be out in the bush, it's so peaceful out there. Pretty exited for the camp! . Have my singing bowl packed and ready to go
  16. Justler

    2013 Camping Trip - East Coast - Blue Mountains - May

    Two weeks! I believe the 26-28th. Don't think PM's have been initiated yet either.
  17. Justler

    'Ayahuasca' germination advice

    Hi everyone! I'm attempting to germinate some seeds. All seeds came from a local source, though I'm not sure where they originated before that. Also not sure on age/freshness/viability. Planning on trying a few methods, as I'm pretty keen to get some of these lil guys growing. Seeds I'm looking at germinating: Banisteriopsis Caapi Banisteriopsis Muricata Alicia Anisopetala White Ayahausca (not caapi - species unknown) I'm only been able to find information on Caapi germination, so most of what I've mentioned below is based on such. Current plan for all seeds: Soil - 75% potting mix with 25% perlite. Layer of live sphagnum moss on top. Read on SAB that sphagnum was great for caapi germination (anti fungal and anti bacterial properties). Seeds planted in soil, with sphagnum placed on top. Should the seeds be planted in the sphagnum as opposed to the soil? Hydration - Soil moistened with distilled water (I read somewhere distilled is more effective for seed germination than tap water) Humidity - storage container with holes (covered with micropore tape) drilled at soil level for FAE. Location - inside the house - temps ranging from 21 - 29 degrees Lighting - CFL 6500k day light. Wattage and lumens unknown at present. I don't believe this is to important for the initial germination phase though. 'Pots' - Disposable foam cups. Cheap and effective Orientation - For Caapi and Muricata the wing will be facing up. For Alicia the "butterfly's" will be facing up, but also trimmed to shorten (aim is to decrease soil resistance and conserve plants energy). For White Aya, the "stem" part will be facing up. Potential variables for seeds: Constant bottom heat - Should I use a heating mat? Normal temps will be ranging from 21 - 29 degrees. I believe the heating mat i have (no thermostat) claimed to be able to raise heat by 10 degrees. It's a cheap e-bay mat. Not sure on how much an increase it would cause. Wattage unknown. GA3 - I've read 350 - 500ppm, and 650 - 700ppm. Never used this stuff before. Will using the higher range 650-700ppm have any negative effects? Can you use too much of this stuff? Is it safer to stick the lower range 350-500ppm? Just hoping for advice on potential concerns you may see with my proposed plan, and would like to hear your thoughts on the proposed potential variables. All advice that may improve the chances of success is welcome Thanks!
  18. Justler

    'Ayahuasca' germination advice

    Thanks Amazonian, I've just added orientation. Wing will be facing up for the Caapi seeds. I'll have a look for the thread that mentions Sphagnum moss later and link it. Is rot generally the result to much hydration over a long period of time? Would the same level of hydration germinate fresh seed, but cause rot on less viable seed?
  19. Justler

    WTB Special Aya vines

    I found some B muricata seeds and White Aya from various sources. Just praying for some to germinate. Would definitely be interested in pooling resources to find other special vines.
  20. Justler

    WTB Special Aya vines

    Hi lovely people! I'm in search of some special vines and would appreciate any help I could get to source a live plant / rooted cutting. The vines that interest me the most are: Banisteriopsis Muricata Tetrapterys methystica Diplopterys cabrerana (chaliponga) Rattle Caapi or Ayahuasca cascabel Boa Ayahuasca Red Ayahuasca White Ayahuasca I believe some of these are already floating around Aus, and I'd happily pay good coin for a plant. Also interested in any other exciting vines out there that I may not be aware of . If you can help, please contact me. Cheers. J.
  21. Justler

    Germinating low viability seeds

    That's a really interesting find, thanks for sharing that Sally. Might have to send some interesting seeds your way, if my methods fail me. On another note, I've read previously (can't for the life of me find the article) that worm 'urine' increased the production of the alkaloid Capsaicin in chilli's. I've often wondered if it would have similar effects on other alkaloids. Edit: Similar article found. Worm Juice: Worm juice consists of a number of components that provide benefits to plant health. Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Potassium are available in a high number of plant-available forms to allow nutrient absorption through all plant pathways. Plant growth promoters (plant hormones) are also detected in the product. These include (but are not limited to) Auxins, Cytokinins and Gibberellins all of which regulate cell development, growth and elongation. Microbial loading is very high in worm juice. There are a number of beneficial bacteria that offer synergistic assistance to the plant. Such bacteria colonise the plant rhizosphere (root zone) to extend root surface area and thus increase nutrient/water absorption capabilities. The bacteria also often produce localised chemicals that prevent further colonisation of pathogenic (disease-causing) microbes. Chitin (a key component of insect exoskeletons) is also contained in worm juice. When detected around plant roots, signalling mechanisms trigger the plant to produce defence chemicals that are shipped all over the plant to deter feeding insects (e.g. aphids, thrips, white flies, caterpillars). As a summary worm juice feeds plants thoroughly, permits optimal growth regulation, offers microbial pathogen resistance, pest resistance and drought resistance. Use of this product allows the full genetic potential of the plant to be achieved (i.e. maximising the pungency of a chilli). http://thechillifactory.com/hottest - Not exactly a journal article, but interesting starting point for research. Secret to hottest chillies: worm juice The two worked with honours student Mark Peacock, who was studying chillies at the University of Sydney. Mark's technical skill supplemented the farmers' practical know-how. Marcel adopted Neil's idea in using liquid runoff from a worm farm - 'worm juice' - to fertilise the crop and he believes this is the secret to the super-hot chilli. "He originally worked with it but didn't understand why it worked," says Mark, who studied the fertiliser. He discovered that worm juice contains nutrients, plant growth hormones and promoters, beneficial bacteria that colonise the root area, and chitin from dead insects that triggers the plant's natural defence systems. Mark uses worm juice on the Trinidad Scorpion Butch T chillies growing in his back yard. "We use very, very similar growing techniques and that probably has the most to do with attaining maximum genetic potential of the chilli," says Mark. http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/aussies-grow-worlds-hottest-chilli.htm Application of chitin and chitosan as elicitors of coumarins and fluoroquinolone alkaloids in Ruta graveolens L. (common rue). Orlita A, Sidwa-Gorycka M, Paszkiewicz M, Malinski E, Kumirska J, Siedlecka EM, Łojkowska E, Stepnowski P. Source Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdañsk, ul. Sobieskiego 18, PL 80-952 Gdańsk, Poland. Abstract: Common rue (Ruta graveolens L.) accumulates various types of secondary metabolites, such as coumarins furanocoumarins, acridone and quinolone alkaloids and flavonoids. Elicitation is a tool extensively used for enhancing secondary-metabolite yields. Chitin and chitosan are examples of elicitors inducing phytoalexin accumulation in plant tissue. The present paper describes the application of chitin and chitosan as potential elicitors of secondary-metabolite accumulation in R. graveolens shoots cultivated in vitro. The simple coumarins, linear furanocoumarins, dihydrofuranocoumarins and fluoroquinolone alkaloids biosynthesized in the presence of chitin and chitosan were isolated, separated and identified. There was a significant increase in the growth rate of R. graveolens shoots in the presence of either chitin or chitosan. Moreover, the results of the elicitation of coumarins and alkaloids accumulated by R. graveolens shoots in the presence of chitin and chitosan show that both compounds induced a significant increase in the concentrations of nearly all the metabolites. Adding 0.01% chitin caused the increase in the quantity (microg/g dry weight) of coumarins (pinnarin up to 116.7, rutacultin up to 287.0, bergapten up to 904.3, isopimpinelin up to 490.0, psoralen up to 522.2, xanhotoxin up to 1531.5 and rutamarin up to 133.7). The higher concentration of chitosan (0.1%) induced production of simple coumarins (pinnarin up to 116.7 and rutacultin up to 287.0), furanocoumarins (bergapten up to 904.3, isopimpinelin up to 490.0, psoralen up to 522.2, xanhotoxin up to 1531.5) and dihydrofuranocoumarins (chalepin up to 18 and rutamarin up to 133.7). Such a dramatic increase in the production of nearly all metabolites suggests that these compounds may be participating in the natural resistance mechanisms of R. graveolens. The application of chitin- and chitosan-containing media may be considered a promising prospect in the biotechnological production of xanthotoxin, isopimpinelin, psoralen, chalepin or methoxylated dictamnine derivatives. Dont have access to the article or time to search at present, but it sounds interesting. Time to start a worm farm
  22. Justler

    Man caught with 700 LSD tabs

    Yep, dogs sure can. http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/product/fluka/P1334?lang=en&region=AU "Substitute for controlled substances in the training of narcotics detector dogs. Mimics the odor of LSD." Whether or not all dogs are trained too is a different story, but the means to train them exist.
  23. Justler

    what are your top 10 must have ethno plants?

    Top 5: Anadenanthera colubrina - First plant I grew from seed. Loved seeing it develop. It grew incredible fast in the first few weeks. Such a nice plant to look at. Banisteriopsis caapi - Love watching these guys grow! Every time I walk past, the new growth is in a different position, exploring the world around it. Argyreia nervosa - Another amazing plant to watch grow. Such a fast grower, with beautiful heart shaped leaves. Trichocereus var Roseii 1 - My fastest and largest Cactus. First Trich flower I've ever seen in person. Love it! Alicia anisopetala - New to my collection, but my most treasured plant at the moment. I think it's more the mystery of this plant that makes it so special to me.
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