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The Corroboree
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bogfrog

what could this be?

Question

this cactus is now deceased thanks to a particularly infectious rot but there is a mega mother plant still alive

i thought at the time maybe a pascana or tersheckii because of the sheer size and this was the only pup from a huge plant traveling up 3 stories of the side of a building

IMG_0390

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Terscheckii does grow to be the larger diameter of the two though even though older werdermannianus appear to have more extensive branching.

that defies the original descriptions

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Where's the original description for werdermannianus to be found Archaea?

The one you provided before states that werdermannianus has a smaller diameter than terscheckii.

Also, unless the original description is different with regards to spination, you contradict yourself in considering Bolivia 50.1998 to be a form of werdermannianus, as it does not fit the description you quoted previously.

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i don't consider bolivia 50.1998 to be werd, it just bears that name

The one you provided before states that werdermannianus has a smaller diameter than terscheckii.

true, i read it wrong

it says that terscheckii is about 3 cm wider...

my mistake

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From this link to kt's post it is fairly apparent that T. validus, T. tacaquirensis, T. taquimbalensis, T. escayachensis, and T. werdermannianus (at least the Bolivia 50.1998) are all the same "form," or at least all the plants referred to by these names in kt's post appear synonymous. (I really wish the name game could be settled; I probably would just follow Anderson is saying they were all T. tacaquirensis.) I won't necessarily disagree with the Bolivia 71.0083 being another form, but I must admit it is quite a good degree different.

In regards to the first "form" it clearly should be noted that fully mature growth can radically alter in appearance as seen in the following photos. These are all plants in and around Tupiza, Bolivia.

post-19-0-66771100-1302737304_thumb.jpg

post-19-0-82663900-1302737247_thumb.jpg

post-19-0-39106300-1302736992_thumb.jpg

post-19-0-64810900-1302737796_thumb.jpg

The second form is interesting in its similarity to T. terscheckii. The following photos are of T. terscheckii-like plants also from the same region of Tupiza.

post-19-0-33084700-1302737703_thumb.jpg

post-19-0-74438300-1302737922_thumb.jpg

post-19-0-98662400-1302738084_thumb.jpg

I really wish this second series of photos had plants in bloom to determine if they have flowers similar to T. terscheckii or like the T. tacaquirensis in the first as the flowers of the two species seem distinct enough from each other.

~Michael~

great habitat pics MS you must get to see some of the coolest plants

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great habitat pics MS you must get to see some of the coolest plants

Ha ha ha ha ha....how little you know. I certainly don't mean to give the impression that I am the one taking the pictures. I'm just a sedentary 9 to 5 family man with a small green thumb and the occasional down time to scour the internet for photos, all the while finding time to read through Will Durant's 11 volume "The Story of Civilization." Cactus are just a light hobby.

~Michael~

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From this link to kt's post it is fairly apparent that T. validus, T. tacaquirensis, T. taquimbalensis, T. escayachensis, and T. werdermannianus (at least the Bolivia 50.1998) are all the same "form," or at least all the plants referred to by these names in kt's post appear synonymous. (I really wish the name game could be settled; I probably would just follow Anderson is saying they were all T. tacaquirensis.) I won't necessarily disagree with the Bolivia 71.0083 being another form, but I must admit it is quite a good degree different.

In regards to the first "form" it clearly should be noted that fully mature growth can radically alter in appearance as seen in the following photos. These are all plants in and around Tupiza, Bolivia.

attachicon.gifBolivia Tupiza 5.jpg

attachicon.gifBolivia Tupiza 1 alt.jpg

attachicon.gifBolivia Tupiza 4.jpg

attachicon.gifBolivia Tupiza 21 alt.jpg

The second form is interesting in its similarity to T. terscheckii. The following photos are of T. terscheckii-like plants also from the same region of Tupiza.

attachicon.gifBolivia Tupiza 4.jpg

attachicon.gifBolivia T_wedermann Limeta near Tupiza alt.jpg

attachicon.gifBolivia Tupiza 42 alt.jpg

I really wish this second series of photos had plants in bloom to determine if they have flowers similar to T. terscheckii or like the T. tacaquirensis in the first as the flowers of the two species seem distinct enough from each other.

~Michael~

AMG they're some sexy pics!

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interesting thread to surrender!

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