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fyzygy

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About fyzygy

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    Australia

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  1. fyzygy

    S. recognita success rates?

    I think humidity is their enemy, especially early on. Seeds I bought from the UK came with (generic) instructions to remove from greenhouse at first sign of germination. I didn't -- and within a day or two of sprouting my first seedling had simply vanished. I had a couple that succumbed to damping off a few weeks later. Eventually I got 3 plants out of 20 or more seeds. Going easy on the watering is probably key -- personally I wouldn't recommend coco coir or anything that holds water. They grow natively at the base of cliffs, which implies a lot of stony rubble. They thrive in arid environments, tolerating a bit more water in summer. It seems to me that the production of offsets (plantlets) is the plant's primary reproductive strategy (and they're one of the easiest plants to clone). Many seedpods contain under-sized seeds, and even if of a decent size, germination rates are notoriously low. 10-20% sounds about right, in my experience. Someone suggested to cold-stratify the seeds, but I've not bothered with any special treatments. Full sunlight is okay, except harsh summer sun can cause them to wilt. S. recognita is listed among "difficult to propagate" salvias by the Victorian Salvia Study Group. Some info I found in an eBook: “TYPE, HABIT, AND SIZE A hardy perennial with a woody basal leaf clump 12 inches (30 cm) tall and 18 inches (45 cm) wide and with flowering stems 24–30 inches (60–75 cm) tall. HARDINESS Zone 6 ORIGIN Turkey CULTIVATION Grows best in arid climates. Prefers very well drained, lean soil and occasional water in summer. LANDSCAPE USE A perennial for the xeric landscape.” Excerpt From: John Whittlesey. “The Plant Lover's Guide to Salvias.” Apple Books.
  2. fyzygy

    Salvia recognita seed

    Packs of 10 seeds. Freshly harvested. Limited number available. $10 including postage, or trade for other botanicals. “TYPE, HABIT, AND SIZE A hardy perennial with a woody basal leaf clump 12 inches (30 cm) tall and 18 inches (45 cm) wide and with flowering stems 24–30 inches (60–75 cm) tall. HARDINESS Zone 6 ORIGIN Turkey CULTIVATION Grows best in arid climates. Prefers very well drained, lean soil and occasional water in summer. LANDSCAPE USE A perennial for the xeric landscape.” Excerpt From: John Whittlesey. “The Plant Lover's Guide to Salvias.” Apple Books.
  3. First flowers emerging, from one of my potted specimens, around 3 years old.
  4. Last of a batch. Best till last. PM if interested in trade.
  5. fyzygy

    Gnomish

  6. Acacias of Australia was eventually published in 2 volumes. I have the first volume, original edition. The illustrations are amazing. I was disappointed that there were no entries for some of the more renowned ethnobotanical species. Information is aimed at horticulturists, very little on traditional use as food or medicine. Incredibly detailed drawings, and a glossary too, make this a good reference for botanists.
  7. If there is rot you would do better to expose those parts to sunlight and ventilation, rather than bury them. Horizontal takes longer, in my experience, for both roots and pups to form. It's hard to say why some cuttings throw pups and even flowers in preference to roots, no matter which way they're oriented.
  8. It could put energy into making pups, rather than roots. But it could already be putting energy into fighting an infection, rather than root production. I'd be keeping water well away from it, for the time being.
  9. That's a cool plant. Too bad people don't divulge their sources, because private custodians often respond positively if you ask nicely. Why not cut the rotted tips off? You might be able to trim some of the excised material for grafting, as I'm sure others would be happy to add this one to their collections. And it's the right season for new pups to form on the planted stumps. Good score.
  10. Virtually flawless specimen of a pachanoi (TPM) x peruvianus (TPC) hybrid. 18cm tip cut. PM if interested.
  11. The least problematic ID so far would be first response above, Trichocereus peruvianus. That covers all possibilities, including ones you haven't considered. We know (or strongly suspect) that roseii originated in the Matucana region. It's a specific locale, even though "Matucana type" may have come to be used as a shorthand to describe physical (rather than geographical) characteristics. I wouldn't use it other than casually for a Tricho of unknown genetics. I have some anonymous Trichos with "peruvianoid" features. I'm tempted to call one of them "roseii 3" because it strongly resembles (but is subtly different from) both roseii 1 and 2 specimens that I have/had. You have to compare them directly in order to notice they're different. Similar, but different. I think "peruvianoid" and "bridgesiioid" were adopted by Keeper Trout to acknowledge the sheer diversity of individual specimens (i.e. a strong potential for wild hybridisation) in the face of inadequate classification schemes. Even T. peruvianus runs into conflict with other naming and classificatory schemes (Echinopsis, macrogonus, etc.). But it's still your safest bet. This online seller has one that looks quite similar to yours, labelled "NOID" (no ID). Though it's obviously T. peruvianus -- or at least, has peruviaNOID characteristics.
  12. fyzygy

    Phalaris spp?

    I just think they're beautiful grasses, whatever these are. I will try and get a few close-ups with my camera. I recall that 5 - 10 years ago I tried growing a couple of Phalaris species from seed, but nothing germinated. I was aware of the potentially toxic alkaloid profile, so wasn't too disappointed. This is the first year I've deliberately abstained from mowing the grass in the back yard.
  13. How long is a piece of string?
  14. They will cooperate, not compete for space. Do nothing, and be amazed at how smart your plants are. I would say that Roseii *is* a Matucana peruvianoid. I haven't seen an eight-ribbed specimen, but wouldn't rule it out. Length of spines, number of ribs or pups are all partly a function of environment (sunlight, food, water, etc.).
  15. Two unusual grasses in my back yard. Could be Phalaris spp?
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