Cimi

Repotting lophs after winter - soil mix tips?

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Hi guys, my lophs haven't been repotted for a year or two and this spring I really want to do the right thing by them and set them up for long-term health and growth. Previously I had them in a coir / sand / perlite mix with some added charcoal & porous volcanic rock chunks. I would like some recommendations for the best types of soil mix for adult lophs. I will definitely be getting some crushed shells / limestone to mix in as well, and get back into the Seasol. Any fertiliser recommendations are also very welcome. I've recently moved house so unfortunately I don't have access to any good compost or worm castings at the moment. The garden soil here isn't the best, either so any recommendations for how I can make them a good mix are much appreciated. Sadly I haven't had much time for gardening lately and they've been neglected for a while. Thanks guys.

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If you want your ultimate mix, check out the article linked in the opening post of this thread.... 

I think everyone who's read it at least imagines making the ultimate mix... I liked the ideas, and definitely take it into account when making mixes, but I generally end up just making a mix of river sand and organic matter... I'd very highly recommend using unglazed terracotta pots for cacti... 

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Thanks for the link - very helpful. Yeah I have them in unglazed terra cotta and it really is the best for controlling moisture levels.

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Oh dear I was wrong about everything! Even repotting at this time of year. Good to know!

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My standard mix for Mexican desert cacti is mostly coarse grit, with crushed limestone, a little topsoil and some wormcasts and kelp.  I use unglazed terra cotta pots, the Long Tom type to accommodate the deep tap root. 

CIMG0831.JPG

CIMG0832.JPG

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I used to avoid the white stones kitty litter... and pure DE kitty litter only went so far before needing some soil added

..maybe that white kitty litter can be my source of lime other than whatever is in john innes#3.

 

I recall this article being one of the very first I read at the beginning of noobality ... it was really good to see it again through more experienced eyes... 

 

How deep are your loph bowls please Snr Fly? 

 

what about watering ? ... does anyone know how long after a repot one should leave a loph before watering? ,

 is some time given to avoid any undetected root damage rotting and given time to heal first? 

 

and if you might know full well that there were no root damage after repotting,.. would it be good or bad to water right away? or feed right away? ... and that's providing one allowed their washed/rinsed mineral media to dry first...

and would it relate to how recently the plant had been fed or watered prior to a repot?

 

is there a flush needed with no feed (like with orchids)? - if you use feeding too , surplus to the mineral substrate as nutrition for the plant

....or do you think plant nutes on top would be overkill? :) 

-and perhaps just let the rain and the minerals do their magick?

 

I wonder if the white kitty litter can sub for pumice and perlite ... I guess time will tell 

 

I reckon Acacia mixes could have potential to be stand in's or tweaked accordingly ... any thoughts on that idea anyone?

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perhaps the garden soil not being the best could actually be beneficial ...

...if not the best refers to it being poor soil and not too rich ..  

...but for the beneficial micro beauties who might be living there as a top soil ...

 

glad to be able to check granite from the list ...

looks really nice to be able to pot up and leave so as to speak ..  like orchids

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Well I have ONLY A FEW plants in literally dirt (from garden) and theyre alot harder to grow than trichocereus and they dont 'die or rot'. Infact I have a few gymnocalicium's and pilosocereus in plain old dirt..... yes when it rains heavy they are soggy but they've been in there for years like that and grow fine, I do find that plain soil (loam or dirt whatever you call it) holds nutrients better than some bunnings potting mix (mostly bark?) with some perlite. Having said that I am no expert but all of my Astrophytums and ariocarpus are in a super free draining mix of perlite, stone, sand etc. It is interesting though because I would deem my climate (Victoria) as somewhat fkn cold!

 

*Edit* I only use plastic pots too no terra, I drill bigger holes in bottoms.

Edited by Zyppel
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19 hours ago, Spanishfly said:

My standard mix for Mexican desert cacti is mostly coarse grit...

 

Thanks Spanishfly. When you say coarse grit, are you referring to any mineral in particular? Where do you get it? Are you referring to shell grit at all?

 

I'm assuming you probably mean particles of about 1mm diameter? Thanks.

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On ‎20‎/‎08‎/‎2017 at 1:10 PM, MountainGoat said:

If you want your ultimate mix, check out the article linked in the opening post of this thread.... 

I think everyone who's read it at least imagines making the ultimate mix... I liked the ideas, and definitely take it into account when making mixes, but I generally end up just making a mix of river sand and organic matter... I'd very highly recommend using unglazed terracotta pots for cacti... 

 

 There are as many ULTIMATE mixes as there are growers!!!

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2 hours ago, Cimi said:

Thanks Spanishfly. When you say coarse grit, are you referring to any mineral in particular? Where do you get it? Are you referring to shell grit at all?

 

I'm assuming you probably mean particles of about 1mm diameter? Thanks.

 

 

I use a material labelled granitos - I buy it at a builder´s merchant - the Spanish use it as a sort of pebble dashing.  A lot coarser than 1 mm - that would be sand IMHO.  I´ll take a pic.

CIMG0836.JPG

CIMG0837.JPG

Edited by Spanishfly
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Yeah, just re-potted mine, in  unglazed terracotta pots, using a grouse mix made by old mate, trusted SAB visionary, Dr Greenthumbs.

$25 for a nice bag specially mixed, job done, should be right for the next 5 yrs.

Check out his stuff, yeah, I couldnt help using this thread to give him a well deserved plug.

https://www.drgreenthumbs.com.au/collections/cactus-bonsai-succulent-grow-mediums-australia

 

image.jpg

Edited by Horus
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5 hours ago, Zyppel said:

Well I have ONLY A FEW plants in literally dirt (from garden) and theyre alot harder to grow than trichocereus and they dont 'die or rot'. Infact I have a few gymnocalicium's and pilosocereus in plain old dirt..... yes when it rains heavy they are soggy but they've been in there for years like that and grow fine, I do find that plain soil (loam or dirt whatever you call it) holds nutrients better than some bunnings potting mix (mostly bark?) with some perlite. Having said that I am no expert but all of my Astrophytums and ariocarpus are in a super free draining mix of perlite, stone, sand etc. It is interesting though because I would deem my climate (Victoria) as somewhat fkn cold!

 

*Edit* I only use plastic pots too no terra, I drill bigger holes in bottoms.

 

DIRT is something I wash off my car - my plants don´t grow in it.

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14 hours ago, ☽Ţ ҉ĥϋηϠ₡яღ☯ॐ€ðяئॐ♡Pϟiℓℴϟℴ said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How deep are your loph bowls please Snr Fly? 

 

what about watering ? ... does anyone know how long after a repot one should leave a loph before watering? ,

 is some time given to avoid any undetected root damage rotting and given time to heal first? 

 

 

 

 

A pic of some Long Tom pots of various sizes - deep in relation to their diameter.  I use them for Lophs, Ariocarpus, Encephalocarpus - all cacti with deep taproots. I imported a good number from the UK at enormous effort. 

 

Lophophora are the most resilient of cacti - I lose a plant or two every winter, but it is NEVER a Lophophora.  So I don´t over fuss about watering after repotting, just bung it to them.

CIMG0835.JPG

Edited by Spanishfly
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52 minutes ago, Spanishfly said:

 

 

Lophophora are the most resilient of cacti - I lose a plant or two every winter, but it is NEVER a Lophophora.  So I don´t over fuss about watering after repotting, just bung it to them.

CIMG0835.JPG

I think lophs can tolerate a pretty wide variety of conditions as long as they get a little time to acclimatise. 

Your plants are beautiful, steel grey!

 

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23 hours ago, Spanishfly said:

 

 

I use a material labelled granitos - I buy it at a builder´s merchant - the Spanish use it as a sort of pebble dashing.  A lot coarser than 1 mm - that would be sand IMHO.  I´ll take a pic.

CIMG0836.JPG

CIMG0837.JPG

Thanks again. That looks like quartz I think.

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22 hours ago, Horus said:

Yeah, just re-potted mine, in  unglazed terracotta pots, using a grouse mix made by old mate, trusted SAB visionary, Dr Greenthumbs.

$25 for a nice bag specially mixed, job done, should be right for the next 5 yrs.

Check out his stuff, yeah, I couldnt help using this thread to give him a well deserved plug.

https://www.drgreenthumbs.com.au/collections/cactus-bonsai-succulent-grow-mediums-australia

 

Awesome! Someone else already beat you to it in a PM as well! The site looks awesome tyvm I will definitiely be using it.

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On 8/22/2017 at 8:28 PM, Horus said:

Yeah, just re-potted mine, in  unglazed terracotta pots, using a grouse mix made by old mate, trusted SAB visionary, Dr Greenthumbs.

$25 for a nice bag specially mixed, job done, should be right for the next 5 yrs.

Check out his stuff, yeah, I couldnt help using this thread to give him a well deserved plug.

https://www.drgreenthumbs.com.au/collections/cactus-bonsai-succulent-grow-mediums-australia

 

image.jpg

 

Wow thanks Horus! How are they liking the new mix?

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Going great. Still haven't watered yet, maybe its time. Got a nice flower. I think you have made a winner with that stuff.

I just wish I had more rare gems to pot up with it..

 

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