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Stillman

salvia splendens psychoactivity

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I am curious as to what is deemed more pungent psychoactivity the flowers or the leaves, as I am new to experimenting with this plant I am curious to know other peoples opinions regarding what is best to use the flowers or the leaves?

Mick

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i smoked 4 leaves in a dagga mix and then placed one under my tongue straight after and felt very strong stoney/spacey effects... I just offered some seeds in my trade thread, if your keen and have some plants etc we could do a seed/cutting swap as Ive heard its highly dependable on the individual using it and the plants alk. levels... Im heaps keen to see this worked on more!

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Cool man I have a few different salvias not just splendens and am going to collect some more so give me a few weeks and I tried two experiments with S splendens today I chewed some flowers from a blue S splendens and definitely got some effect and later in the day tried a few leaves from a red variety which made me feel odd as well. I also have a Salvia guaranitica and another Salvia that I can't remember but is supposed to heighten memory and recall. Once I do some testing I want to try and make a blend and see what happens.

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did some research on one of my S splendens bought as Salvia vanhoutei

Interestingly enough it was one of the first S splendens kept before it was dwarfed and may hold a few more interesting elements or possibly higher levels, in saying this it will have to be researched to access if any of this is true.

An extract I found on a gardening forum

Here is the scoop on Salvia vanhouttei. I got the burgundy (brownish-red) flowered plant from Longwood Gardens who in turn purchased it from a nursery in South Africa on a buying trip. I then disseminated the plant to as many nurseries, collectors, and botanical grdens that were interested over several years. The plant in the images posted looks like this form.

Betsy Clebsch had Dr. Ian Hedge, emeritus of the Royal Botanical Garden of Edinburgh and the world's foremost expert on Salvias check out the provenance of Salvia vanhouttei and determined that it was probably the result of early breeding experiments on Salvia splendens by Dutch or Belgian nurserymen. The sport was named after van Houtte, a Belgian who did much collecting in Brazil.

The original burgundy form often throws orange flowered seedlings that look a lot like the ancestral splendens. These were distributed by several persons, including Frances Parker of Beaufort, SC. In my hands, many of these were weak growers.

One of the individuals who bought the burgundy vanhouttei was Barb Smith of Pendleton, SC (near Clemson University). She came up with the form Paul (dark purple), named after her son. Some of the Paul clone generated the other forms, including a lavender, a plum, a light orange (peach), and other orange to red forms. Pine Knot Nursery of southern Virginia (Clarksville) near Henderson, NC also had a plant of Paul that threw similar colored forms, which I have.

Properly, all of these plants should be listed as Salvia splendens, although there probably are genes from other sages thet contribute the different leaf shapes, growth habits, and flower colors. Any generation after F2 is going to develop forms that vary from one parent to the other.

Naming these is a problem, since many of the discoverers of the chance seedlings have not given them varietal names.

just a bit of info for anyone who is interested.

Mick

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I did some testing today smoked a small amount of leaf and flowers from a purple flowered S splendens then chewed a flower up as well. Feel very relaxed and spaced out now maybe a touch of blurred vision and difficulty typing, I think if I was to blend a few varieties and species of Salvia together and smoke or chew it up you could have a very interesting time. Definitely doing a bit more research.

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Just curiously does anyone know of any serious side effects from ingesting S splendens?

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not likely what varieties have you personally tried the dwarf types are inactive.

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its not a psychedelic high in any way, its more opiate a warmness in the chest heavy limbs slightly disorientated, I can assure you this variety has some active properties.

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Jut picked up a punnet of S Splendens from Woollies for $3...

Unsure of psychoactivity, just grabbed it on a whim.

I come here to suss it out...And lo and behold its Sir Psycho Sexy Stillman that has the answers for me. Hahaha

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its not a psychedelic high in any way, its more opiate a warmness in the chest heavy limbs slightly disorientated, I can assure you this variety has some active properties.

How can you make that assurance? People who tested under double blind couldn't spot the difference between it and placebo?

AFAIK the only confirmed psychoactive use is to increase sensitivity to S divinorum in those heads which are hard to it.

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what assurance? That it is not a psychedelic high?

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what assurance? That it is not a psychedelic high?

You said "I can assure you this variety has some active properties". I asked, how can you make this assurance? Especially considering proper double blind human assays for splendens have shown up nothing?

Edited by apothecary

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I do believe that certain strains of S splendens contain active properties. I think there is a calmative almost mild antidepressant quality.

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DSCF2069.jpg

This was the variety I messed around with,

also S leucantha and S guaranitica 'Costa Rica' The costa rico had definite sedative quality.

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I do believe that certain strains of S splendens contain active properties. I think there is a calmative almost mild antidepressant quality.

IMHO when reporting to the forums it's really, really, really important to stress the difference between a personal bioassay and actual scientifically verified fact.

What you believe and think needs to be stated with great care, rather than carelessly, which gives people the opportunity to mis-read your statements!

and again:

The costa rico had definite sedative quality

Come on dude! What you mean to say is that:

"the one time I smoked this plant in an un-measured, un-standardised dose, I felt it had a sedative quality, which could easily have been the effect of placebo."

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I'm not sure why this annoys you so much? Almost a year ago I was messing around with Salvias I grew a heap of varieties out I still have most as my bees love them. I mentioned above, a year ago, that I felt this strain had some promise also the S splendens bought as Salvia vanhoutei as this is apparently the wild strain. I also thought S leucantha may be worth a look as the flowers remind me alot of S divinorum. ANd I had read studies on S guaranitica 'Costa Rica' being used as a hypnotic so I thought I should have a look at that too. And I did a year ago. And I found they seem to have mild ant depressant qualities and a sedative quality. And I still believe that. Maybe I should contact the University and see if I can get a grant and then I might have the data you want. Its not a trip report mate.

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Half of the reason I left this forum was exactly because more and more people were coming on and spouting their personal opinion as fact to other people who didn't know any better and if you tried to point out that it was nothing more than opinion you ended up in this exact back-and-forth.

I can see it's still the same. I'm not really interested in contributing to this sort of thing, so I'll leave you and the others to it. Enjoy!

Its not a trip report mate.

I agree, at least a trip report covers a modicum of information which can be useful in any attempts to reproduce the assay as opposed to "hey I ingested an (indeterminate amount?) of (dry?) (fresh?) plant matter and am now convinced it has XYZ effects."

Edited by apothecary

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For all the Scientist out there lifted from around the net.

S. guaranitica is a traditional medicinal plant used in Latin America as sedative. The presence of cirsiliol in its extracts was previously demonstrated, and this flavonoid was shown to be a competitive low affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligand [see Phytomedicine (1996) 3, 29-32]. This report describes the pharmacological properties of S. guaranitica extracts and of its active principle, cirsiliol. A partially purified fraction of the plant (collected in Buenos Aires, Argentina), administered intraperitoneally in mice (in a dose equivalent to 3 g of the fresh plant), exhibited sedative and hypnotic effects as measured in the hole board and in the pentobarbital-induced sleep tests, respectively. This fraction had no anxiolytic or myorelaxant effects. In the pentobarbital-induced sleep test, cirsiliol (2-10 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited a dose-dependent hypnotic action. In contrast, it did not produce myorelaxant (up to 30 mg/kg) or anticonvulsant (up to 10 mg/kg) effects. Cirsiliol was more potent in displacing 3H zolpidem binding (Ki = 20 micro M) than 3H flunitrazepam binding (Ki = 200 micro M) to benzodiazepine receptors from rat cerebral cortex. It is concluded that the extracts and the active principle, cirsiliol, possess sedative and hypnotic properties; cirsiliol produces these effects probably acting on the so-called type I benzodiazepine receptor.

ANd some old reading from right here

http://www.shaman-australis.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=2954

Make up your own mind, its not Sally D and it never will be. But I think it has some medicine definitely.

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For all the Scientist out there lifted from around the net.

S. guaranitica is a traditional medicinal plant used in Latin America as sedative. The presence of cirsiliol in its extracts was previously demonstrated, and this flavonoid was shown to be a competitive low affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligand [see Phytomedicine (1996) 3, 29-32]. This report describes the pharmacological properties of S. guaranitica extracts and of its active principle, cirsiliol. A partially purified fraction of the plant (collected in Buenos Aires, Argentina), administered intraperitoneally in mice (in a dose equivalent to 3 g of the fresh plant), exhibited sedative and hypnotic effects as measured in the hole board and in the pentobarbital-induced sleep tests, respectively. This fraction had no anxiolytic or myorelaxant effects. In the pentobarbital-induced sleep test, cirsiliol (2-10 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited a dose-dependent hypnotic action. In contrast, it did not produce myorelaxant (up to 30 mg/kg) or anticonvulsant (up to 10 mg/kg) effects. Cirsiliol was more potent in displacing 3H zolpidem binding (Ki = 20 micro M) than 3H flunitrazepam binding (Ki = 200 micro M) to benzodiazepine receptors from rat cerebral cortex. It is concluded that the extracts and the active principle, cirsiliol, possess sedative and hypnotic properties; cirsiliol produces these effects probably acting on the so-called type I benzodiazepine receptor.

ANd some old reading from right here

http://www.shaman-au...?showtopic=2954

Make up your own mind, its not Sally D and it never will be. But I think it has some medicine definitely.

Stillman, this is exactly why it's important to include the references and in this case I appreciate that you ran it down for us. For etiquette, it's also important you annotate the reference properly so other people can go and find it.

Sedative and hypnotic properties of Salvia guaranitica St. Hil. and of its active principle, Cirsiliol

  • H. Viola1,
  • C. Wasowski2,
  • M. Marder2,
  • C. Wolfman1,
  • A.C. Paladini2,
  • J.H. Medina1, *

  • 1 Instituto de Biologia Celular y Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, UBA
  • 2 Instituto de Quimica y Fisicoquimica Biologicas (UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

I'd point out that a 3g equiv dose is roughly 12% of an average (25g) mouse body weight, so we are talking >5kg fresh material for a 50kg human or >500g dry material. So it would be extremely unlikely to see effects from such a low dose as reported "a few leaves or flowers"...much more likely placebo.

Edited by apothecary

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who doesn't sit down and smoke half a kilo of Salvia? And how do you know how much a mouse weighs? :huh:

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Up until very recently, one of the systems I administered was a small-animal MRI scanner (and related infrastructure), which operates mostly on mice and rats, exactly the genetic lines used in these types of experiments. (hole board test, tail flick test, etc)

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i think stilly and apo, both have to move a bit more towards common ground.

my input for example, is mostly based on my personell experience, and to avoid to get "fried" i always say, i guess, or i think, this plant produces, "said" effects.

i understand apo's view, but many of us who contribute here, have never had any sientific education apart from normal schooling, so i hope we can be a bit lenient towards, those members (i put myselfe in this group).

but further it can be said, that apo only tries to help us, to get better with our contributions, but sure who doesn't get a bit sulky, if it feels like critisism? but it looks, like nobody realy felt pushed back, so all is good.

i only thought, to try to make a point that, only ME, apo, auxin and tort are geniuses here (i try to be funny).

Edited by planthelper
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yeah I'm not cranky I was just taken by surprise because its a year old thread and I haven't really been playing with the Salvias of late. I do 100% see were Apothecary is coming from. You do read some unlikely stuff on the net and Salvia splendens is one of those plants that really divides people there are a lot of dwarf hybrids that seem to even lack the "salvia smell" of the leaf. My thinking... that not everything is black and white sometimes there needs to be a grey that can't be answered by science. But yeah defiantly no crankiness from my end.

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