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Acacia

[GIVE AWAY] (WA ONLY) 'Vetiver Grass' - Chrysopogon zizanioides

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I've got 100 cuttings of Chrysopogon zizanioides to give away to members of SAB. It holds potential for land management, applications include

  1. Carbon sequestration (currently calculated at ~ 3 - 4 x the efficiency of rainforest plots of the same size)
  2. Cleaning heavy metals from waste water
  3. Treating sewerage

*The applications listed above are theoretical until proper research papers are published.

 

There's not a lot of information out there about this plant, but I found this ->
'The medicinal properties are sedative, aromatic as well as antiseptic.  Some of vetiver essential oil constituents include benzoic acid, furfural, valerenol, terpinen-4-ol and khusimol. 

Khus roots essential oil is extracted and utilized for perfumes, aromatherapy, cosmetic, creams, herbal skin care as well as soaps used in a Ayurveda.

Khus oil is a good remedy to treat sores and acne due to its antiseptic medicinal properties.  Khus roots can improve red blood cells deficiency, treat poor blood circulation, dry skin, cracked and brittle skin, wounds, cuts, rheumatism, nervous conditions, arthritis as well as muscular aches and pains.

A syrup can be made from vetiver which can flavor ice-cream, milkshakes, yogurt and various beverages.  Khus khus roots, another versatile medicinal herbs.

The exert below is from a research paper

Quote

3.2. AYURVEDIC PROPERTIES Rasa : Tikta, Madhura Guna : Lakhu, Rooksha Virya : Seeta Vipaka : Katu Vetiver has been known in India from the ancient times. It is known as Khas-Khas and is widely used as cooling agent, tonic and blood purifier. It is used to treat many skin disorders and is known to have calming effect on the nervous system. It is regarded as a stimulant, refrigerant and antibacterial and when applied externally, it removes excess heat from the body and gives a cooling effect. Being a major constituent of ‘Rasayana’ in Ayurveda, different parts of the vetiver plant have traditionally been used by the Indian tribes for treating various ailments, diseases and disorders including boils, burns, epilepsy, fever, scorpion sting, snakebite, sores in the mouth, headache, toothache, weakness, lumbago, sprain, rheumatism, urinary tract infection, malarial fever, acidity relief and as an anti-helmintic. It has also been used in traditional medicine of Asia and Africa, particularly ancient Tamil literature mentions the use of vetiver for medical purposes. Other medicinal uses of Khas Khas include ringworm, indigestion and loss of appetite. It has been considered a high-class perfume. Copper plate inscriptions listing the perfume as one of the articles used by royalty have been discovered in Ayurvedic literature is called as “Suganti-mulaka” i.e. sweet smelling and “Sita Mulaka” (having cool roots). All over India the roots are made to scented mats, fans, ornamental baskets and many other small articles. Also burnt as fumigator.

My partner's father is doing a PHD project on this plant and has lots of it spare.

220px-Vetiver_grass.thumb.jpg.f6c7f43a989c72212354bb96126befe1.jpg

I can only send domestically at this stage, however there are suppliers for the East Coast. You can find more info on them at www.vetiver.org/g/plantsuppliers.htm

 

 Cuttings are 1 foot long. Recipient must cover postage or pick up. PM or reply to the thread to arrange.

 

Edited by Acacia
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Should be fertile, I'll confirm that for you and let you know.

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Shit... Lol... I'm glad I caught the edit. 

 

Good to clarify that the stock is sterile:wink:

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