OneEyeAscension

Planting Acacia's out in the wild

9 posts in this topic

Over the past two years I've been growing different types of Acacia's from seed in pots and giving them away to people who can plant them out on their properties as I have insufficient land on my property for more trees.

I love watching them grow (they're freaking gorgeous) & believe I'm making a positive contribution to the environment and everything within. Their potential as an entheogen also has my interest ;)

Getting to my point...I've currently got 15 young trees growing and over 100 more seeds I'm going to germinate but can't really plant them anywhere at home. I'm thinking about planting them out in the wild and hoping that they'll survive on their own.

- What can I do to give them the best odds of survival? Ie. Location, transplanting age, watering, mulching to retain soil moisture etc

Any other recommendations/suggestions are welcome.

Cheers folks :)

OEA

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I'd suggest not too, they can be very invasive when successful, and, they are successful often.

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Try public places first, like the parks around your neighbourhood or where heaps of planted trees are fairly rough and forgotten about by council to try and keep them contained. Better yet get a native plants guide and a bush guide cos there's gonna be something growing wild and prolific of interest I'm sure.

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I'm in the exact some boat as you OEA,

Firstly I've been considering asking the local council first. Their permission would stop you from getting in a bit of strife if you got court digging up council land!

Most importantly whether you get their permission or not is to be concious of the plants potential as a weed, especially if it's not a native!

Where you plant I would advise be park land around suburbia for the simple reason that the capability of it spreading and damaging protected forests is limited, I know a forest of acuminatas sounds pretty cool, but it's not, especially for the wildlife. Consider where the seed will fall and where the rain will carry them.

The responsibility for this healing practice is simple, don't undo the good of growing the tree by planting it with any less care than you had growing it.

Otherwise offer them on here for the price of postage or get a rewarding $$$ to go with your good karma.

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Oh and as for care, I was thinking a plant no smaller than 2 feet, maybe bring a bucket of mulch per tree and a jug of dilute seasol and let nature decide wether they survive.

If alls good in 6months theoretically you could add some organic slow release native fertaliser to the mulch but that shouldn't be necessary.

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road islands/vacant blocks is where its at. leave native bushland etc alone ;) may take a bit to get established but once they are, definite weed!

Edited by brooa
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when transplanting maybe consider if the plant will be entering its flowering or growth period..

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Good idea , imo , but not in sensitive areas like National Parks .

there is untold industrial wasteland that would benefit from this - you might even receive permission and financial help for improving industrial eye-sore land .

Species like Acuminata , Floribunda , Maidenii , etc , are beautiful long living species and they should do well in damaged areas ; acacias being " pioneering " species .

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Glad I decided to read up and found this before considering anything willy-nilly

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