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The Corroboree

obtuse

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Posts posted by obtuse


  1. As already mentioned there is no mycology degree offered by any australian universities.  but if you look there are some good units around,

     

    my recommendation is to focus on majoring in plant science and microbiology, and then specialise.  consider doing some genetics, and bioinformatics units, given that microscopy is now fairly old school as we progress towards using dna for identification.

     

    University of Tasmania has some good units in mycology, and a fair few researchers doing mycology research there.

     

    University of  Melbourne seems to also be a good place to study mycology.

     

    I recall the sydney university also had some good courses going.

     

    Really in therms of what to study you are only limited by your imagination and government funding.  and finding a good supervisor.  there are so many areas to study, ecological roles of fungi (this is a huge field), natural products and toxicology of fungi if you are interested in chemistry (also huge),  using fungi in remediation, as plant pathogens, soil fungi and the role of glomeraceae in agriculture.

     

    plenty of opportunities if you are interested in just growing them. 

     

    my advice is to learn fungi taxonomy as best you can, start cultivating them at home, and mastering cloning on agar and associated skills, see which aspect of mycology takes your interest and then look at a pathway through undergrad.

    • Like 2

  2. On 22/11/2018 at 6:51 AM, worowa said:

    others have bought my cultures, then started selling them with restrictions on what you can do with them, and renaming them as fictitious species...

     

    Haha.  damn thats cheeky.

     

    yeah, there is a bit going on like that, people use DNA and BLAST searches incorrectly, and selling species based on incorrect assumptions to increase their profile.

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  3. All of the pine loving edibles are mycorrhizal. as Karode mentioned above, create a slurry, or print onto foil and then wash into water. and pour over your plants/around your trees.

     

    you dont need chips or needles.

     

    also mycorrhizal fungi often need to find their host fairly quickly or the mcelium dies, and then you have to take into account existing mycorrhizal relationships.

     

    truffle orchard growers for example go to a lot of effort to ensure the truffles are the only species.

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