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The Corroboree
apothecary

Mimosa updates

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Hello!

Some updates on the Mimosa situation.

This is the BBB stock sold as M hostilis. Definitely not. Growing very quickly, I think it's getting so leggy because it will flower soon.

These are real M. hostilis, seedlings sprouted from seed provided by a generous overseas member of these forums :D

Notice how all of the seedlings, except the one in the third shot there, have an even number of leaflets (or whatever they're called) while that third one has uneven (e.g. three or five)...some sort of mutation possible?

Anyway, just thought I'd provide some updates. My two main projects from last spring have been propagating and distributing real Mimosa hostilis and growing Red Savina. Numerous people have recieved hostilis seed and my Red Savina is flowering right now so there will be seed for that soon.

Enjoy!

Much love.

~apothecary

Edited by apothecary

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wooohoo!

you da man apoth....

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post-70-1142311240_thumb.jpghere are mine...

i did hold them close to some backround so the automatic focus would do it's job proper.

often those digi cams rather focus on the backround than onto the plant.

i just take lot's of shots and then check, which ones are in focus.

Edited by planthelper

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PH:Is hostilis naturally thorny or is this the result of nearby harvesting?

You know the gas they give off in response to herbivors munching on their friends?

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How big where your plants Planthelper when they developed thorns??

Mine are quite small as yet and haven't formed these. They are a beautiful colour!!

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Awesome!

I think the spines go woodier with age. Very nice shot ph, that's what I was hoping for, a sign of more good things to come :wink:

I think apart from Brazil and other countries with M. hostilis farms, the Aussie ethno community is one of the few groups actually propagating this plant :D

Anyone else wanna post some shots?

^_^

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This is from last year. Mine is dormant right now, what with me being on the other side of the planet...

post-873-1142389428_thumb.jpg

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mine are quit young aswell, the thorns form after halve a year or so...

it's very dry where i live, i guess this plant doesn't mind this sort of conditions.

my columbrinas like it aswell here.

apoth, i got two of your peregrinas left, which are still quite small, but as said all those mimosa like plants seem to like my place.

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You did better than I with those supposed peregrinas ph :D

I got I think 3-4 germinations from 6 seed, which I was pretty happy with, but I went away for a few days and when I got back the stems had rotted (not enough airflow I think...they were inside at the time) :(

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good to see that the MH's are doing good Apo! The thorns are a good indicator! flowers (racems) will be the ultimate for pos identification.

I have yet to see Mimosa Scarabella > leaves, flowers and thorns (if they have any) !PICS PICS PICS!

I hear the latter tollerates the cold much better then Hostiles and also heard something about them

better yields.

MY mH'S LOVE it here and I am in a semi arid enviroment - 550 mm year average - 33C daytime max - 22C nightime min.

As for the anadenanthera P. (I think that - could be a sub variety) I have growing here > grows great, xcept still no flowers after 3 years and it's HUGE now. I am sure it loves more rain and perhaps slightly cooler conditions for it to flower. I might try a trick this season, which is to Freeze large buckets of flowering fert water mix and dump that around the base of the trunk to trigger flowering. < a trick my mum learned me which worked with some other forgein trees to induce flowering.

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Here's my newly acquired baby.

I'm still pretty poorly set-up to take care of anything that I can't put in a pot and leave outside but wanted to make a special effort for this little guy.

Skewers, cling-wrap and a desk lamp. I leave the lamp on it for most of the day and at night it's lights out when I hit the sack.

It seems to be working as he's actually putting on fresh growth despite the night-time temps which I'd think would probably get down to around 14-15 (at a rude guess) in my room.

post-1438-1151222815_thumb.jpgpost-1438-1151222863_thumb.jpg

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hmm, morg i am not convinced those are ideal conditions for this plant.

i am hopefull all will go well with your baby, however my guess is that they don't mind a bit of airflow and dryness once in a while. turing off the light once you go to bed, suggest the photoperiode might vary, this is another thing plants don't like. aswell the spectrum from a normal lightbulb doesn't match the spectrum required by plants.

i would put the baby somewhere sheltered, sunny and outdoors.

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hmm, morg i am not convinced those are ideal conditions for this plant.

i am hopefull all will go well with your baby, however my guess is that they don't mind a bit of airflow and dryness once in a while. turing off the light once you go to bed, suggest the photoperiode might vary, this is another thing plants don't like. aswell the spectrum from a normal lightbulb doesn't match the spectrum required by plants.

i would put the baby somewhere sheltered, sunny and outdoors.

Thanks for the advice PH.

You think he'll handle the cold ok? It gets well below 10 degrees outside at night.

Unfortunately, the architecture and positioning of my house conspires against me. I have no place both sheltered and sunny which is a real pain. I'll do my best to find an alternative.

Thanks again for the input. :)

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You think he'll handle the cold ok?

my 2 are in the ground, about 30cm high and have been frosted several times at -2 to -3C

they are stil alive though burnt

the leaves an buds are burnt off those that had ice on them but the stems are still undamaged

and a spell of warm weather has made them start to shoot again

they are my sacraficial lambs

so i can say with some surity that if they can take cold like that at that age then they are going to be frost hardy to maybe -4C at maturity so with protection when young id recommend them anywhere upwards of USDA zone 9B

seeing as theyve now done their bit for science ill go cover them up now i case we frost again tomorrow morning

Anadeanthera colubrina by contrast is hardy to USDA zone 9A. Mine is totally unaffected by the frost and i can easily taking it to the limit of 9A which is minimum -7C

Edited by Rev

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Well, it's out into the wild for my baby then.

Anadeanthera colubrina by contrast is hardy to USDA zone 9A. Mine is totally unaffected by the frost and i can easily taking it to the limit of 9A which is minimum -7C

I've recently found A. colubrina to be very susceptible to possums. :(

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-7 Celsius was the death temp for 1year old seedlings IME.

Also, they don't fare well after a change in humidity from hight to low. For example, I had a number of seedlings under lights in a high humidity environment inside. Good new growth, then I transferred them outside. All new growth crisped off, and the plant died.

I have some scabrella seedlings going now. They grow faster than hostilis, and are a touch glaucous in the leaflets. Hostilis seem to be a truer green.

When transplanting these things, I am struck by the odor of the roots. It is like the smell of wild onions, only a little different. Scabrella has a more pungent smell than hostilis, for what that is worth...

I need a camera. :BANGHEAD2:

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The Winter has been fairly mild here! Nigths seldom <10C. Minimal loss of plant form, however definite dormancy excepting some cacti which have slowed.

hostilis showing the thorn structure and the fibrous hair that secrete a resinous substance during the Summer, quite sweet to taste! Foliage has lost some colour, low dose worm juice regime to maintain vigour and soil profile.

P1010018.jpg

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the onion smell is the rhizosphere microflora and exudates

like plant 'BO'

you get the same from innoculated acacia maidenii and especially albizia lophantha

  • Like 1

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Thanks Rev, I never knew what that smell was.

Triptaka, it is reassuring to see that close-up of your plant. I am always skeptical of my plant ID's, but my hostilis stems look exactly the same as the one you posted.

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I need a camera. :BANGHEAD2:

Update...

#1 Mimosa hostilis seedlings from our friend on the island.

post-873-1156650427_thumb.jpg

#2 2yr old Mimosa hostilis, pruned dramatically this spring.

post-873-1156650458_thumb.jpg

#3 XCU of 2yr old's stem.

post-873-1156650494_thumb.jpg

#4 Mimosa scabrella.

post-873-1156650539_thumb.jpg

#5 XCU Mimosa scabrella stem.

post-873-1156650561_thumb.jpg

B)

Edited by Pisgah

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my link doesn't works :(

it was a resume from an article:

Variation in the accumulation levels of n,n-dimethyltryptamine in micro-propagated trees and in in vitro cultures of Mimosa tenuiflora

María Del Pilar Nicasio A1, María Luisa Villarreal A2, FranÇoise Gillet A3, Lamine Bensaddek A3, Marc-André Fliniaux A3

A1 Centro de Investigación Biomédica del Sur Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social Xochitepec Morelos México

A2 Centro de Investigacion en Biotecnología Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos Cuernavaca Morelos México

A3 Laboratoire de Phytotechnologie Faculté de Pharmacie Université de Picardie Jules Verne Amiens France

Abstract:

The present article reports the accumulation of N,N-dimethyltryptamine and its metabolic precursors (tryptophan, tryptamine) in different organs of micropropagated Mimosa tenuiflora trees (leaves, flowers and bark) subjected to seasonal variations (January and June), as well as in in vitro cultures (plantlets and calluses) of this plant species. The accumulation of all the tested compounds varied according to the organ, the month of collection, and age of the plant material. In all cases, the neurotoxic compound N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) was detected with the lowest concentration 0.01% dry weight (DW) in flowers, and the highest 0.33% DW in bark. For the in vitro cultures, DMT was present in high yields in plantlets (0.1-0.2% DW), while in calluses this compound was initially detected but its concentration decreased significantly in the subsequent subcultures.

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and the highest 0.33% DW in bark.

Stems bark or root bark?

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In all cases, the neurotoxic compound N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT)

What evidence is there that DMT is neurotoxic?

Stems bark or root bark?

Have to read the materials and methods and find out.

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there is another article on the same site :

Isolation and Identification of Putative Hallucinogenic Constituents from the Roots of Mimosa ophthalmocentra

L.M. Batista, R.N. Almeida, E.V.L da-Cunha, M.S. da-Silva, J.M. Barbosa-Filho

Abstract:

A chemical investigation of the roots of Mimosa ophthalmocentra , carried out in our laboratory, with the aim of monitoring the possible hallucinogenic activity, led to isolation and identification of three alkylamines ( N , N -dimethyltryptamine, N -methyltryptamine and hordenine). The results explain the traditional use of this plant by several tribes in northeast Brazil to prepare a potent hallucinogenic drink in mystic-religious ceremonies.

just type "mimosa" in the search function

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