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reptyle

Acacia courtii + obtusifolia

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Posted (edited)

Howdy y'all, 

 

We currently have many A. courtii and A. obtusifolia on offer.

 

$20 each plus postage.

 

I'll make a list of what else is available and add some updates soon.

 

Hope you're all doing well.

 

Blessings, 

 

Reptyle. 

Edited by reptyle
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We have some in pots that are doing ok. They will prefer to go into the ground when they get bigger though. They can become root bound.

 

These seedling are approximately 20cms tall. They have started to produce phyllodes and lose their bipinnate leaves.

 

 

321638791_542756644433986_6954718290765122874_n.jpeg

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11 hours ago, jahliveforever said:

Also do they do well in pots?

I doubt A. obtusifolia and A. courtii would qualify for container-growing, on account of their potential size. A.courtii grows to a height of 20 metres. To my knowledge, most Australian Acacia trees put down a large taproot. 

A. phlebophylla may be the rare exception, suitable for container growing -- according to Herbalistics (?) website. There could be other smallish Acacia varieties too, that might be more suitable.

 

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Ablekay has had a decent size courtii in a 44 gallon drum for years, it's doing fine. Won't ever reach maximum size but it's not suffering either.

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This courtii is doing pretty well so far...

 

If someone were to regularly prune it I imagine it would maintain for the longer term.

signal-2023-01-05-18-38-26-325.jpg

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Size of wild plants doesn't relate to size of container grown plants with proper care. Some of the tallest plants in the world can be grown as a bonsai. A friend of mine has a bonsai Acacia howittii that is 35 years old. You won't find one that old in the wild.

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4 minutes ago, Freakosystem said:

Some of the tallest plants in the world can be grown as a bonsai.

I had presumed phyllode production to be the ultimate goal? Don't get me wrong ... I've got some beauties kept in containers. 

Do acacia trees flower and set seed in a container? Mine haven't, as yet. 

I've got a dwarf phlebophylla if anyone's interested in bonsai effect. 

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Very Interested, sent PM.

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Thanks guys, in my experience some acacias grow really well in pots but some like acuminata just get all lanky and dangley and just dont do well, when ive tried transplanting i find the roots just bundle up at the bottom and dont fill the pot like other acacias, guessing the roots need depth

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7 minutes ago, jahliveforever said:

Thanks guys, in my experience some acacias grow really well in pots but some like acuminata just get all lanky and dangley and just dont do well, when ive tried transplanting i find the roots just bundle up at the bottom and dont fill the pot like other acacias, guessing the roots need depth

 

I recall there were some interesting experiments being done with acacias in long polypipe tubes... some say that it worked well for growing the tap root.

 

Definately big trees prefer the ground, and will do better going directly into the soil immediately than growing with a stunted taproot.

 

 Perhaps some light pruning might help reducing the leggynness. There are probably some hormones that could be used to increase the branching from the trunk etc though I am not an expert on treating acacias in the same way that other commercial crops are treated, so experiment away and report back.  

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Paclobutrazol

 

Plant growth regulators are chemical substances which govern all the factors of development and growth within plants. The application of plant growth regulators to crops modifies hormonal balance and growth leading to increased yield, enhanced crop tolerance against abiotic stress and improved physiological trait of crops. Paclobutrazol (PBZ) [(2RS, 3RS)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)- 4, 4-dimethyl-2-(1H-1, 2, 4-trizol-1-yl)-pentan-3-ol], is one of the members of triazole family having growth regulating property. The growth regulating properties of PBZ are mediated by changes in the levels of important plant hormones including the gibberellins (GAs), abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinins (CK). PBZ affects the isoprenoid pathway, and alters the levels of plant hormones by inhibiting gibberellin synthesis and increasing cytokinins level and consequent reduction in stem elongation. When gibberellins synthesis is inhibited, more precursors in the terpenoid pathway accumulate and that resulted in the production of abscisic acid. PBZ is more effective when applied to the growing media and application on the growing medium would give longer absorption time and more absorption of active ingredient than foliar spray. The application of PBZ to crops is important in reducing plant height to prevent lodging and in increasing number and weight of fruits per tree, in improving the fruit quality in terms of increases in carbohydrates, TSS, TSS/TA and decreases acidity. It further reduces evapo-transpiration and decreases plant moisture stress by enhancing the relative water content of leaf area and develops resistance in the plants against biotic and abiotic stresses. In addition, it acts as highly active systemic fungicide and used against several economically important fungal diseases. In this review, the current knowledge and possible applications of PBZ, which can be used to improve the growth, yield and quality of crops, have been reviewed and discussed. The role of PBZ to mitigate the harmful effects of environmental stresses in crops is also examined. Moreover, various biochemical and physiological processes leading to improved crop production under the effect of PBZ are discoursed in detail.

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13 hours ago, reptyle said:

Perhaps some light pruning might help reducing the leggynness.

Pruning is recommended by Marion Simmons, the late acacia guru. It's better to prune a straggly tree than to stake it, she wrote.

 

13 hours ago, reptyle said:

Plant growth regulators

Some of these may be banned for their carcinogenic effects on human health, at least in relation to the cultivation of food crops and (at least in theory) home-grown cannabis?

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3 hours ago, fyzygy said:

Some of these may be banned for their carcinogenic effects on human health, at least in relation to the cultivation of food crops and (at least in theory) home-grown cannabis?

 

I've been doing some reading in regards triazoles... and it appears to me that their endocrine disrupting effects are a major factor in many of today's metabolic disorders, thyroid disorders and other hormonal imbalances causing such things as endometriosis and various other cancers.

 

I recently did some work on a strawberry farm, and these class of fungicides are used heavily to treat the strawberries and alter growth habit.

 

Certain Triazoles are known to have a long half life in the soil and systemically. So it is no doubt we are ingesting these compounds. 

 

On this same note, there are known medicinal uses for such chemicals, reducing hair loss due to androgen sensitivity and reducing the aromatisation of testosterone to stop breast cancer growth.

 

Good to be aware an DYOR.

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I'm no Acacia expert, but I'd try cutting the apex and pruning before I sprayed PBZ to prevent an acacia plant getting too leggy.

 

maybe an antispiral pot can keep it from becoming rootbound for a while, but it will want to be in the ground eventually.

 

PBZ is banned for everything but ornamentals in aus. It seems like there's a product life cycle for a lot of these agrichems where eventually toxicology evidence becomes too hard to ignore and they are swapped for something less toxic,  with less evidence of harm or with too short a history of use to say otherwise. 

 

as far as PBZ in cannabis goes, no one has studied the effects on health of smoking treated plants, let alone the illegal crops saturated with it and sprayed with it to increase weight and prevent mould. considering it has showed some neurotoxic effects, it's a confounding factor in the 'weed causes schizophrenia' claim imo. PBZ and triazoles (and imadazoles) are reproductive toxins and antiandrogens, something that was also attributed to cannabis.

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for all the information guys, gonna give the pruning a go and see if it helps

 

Didn't know that about mancozeb either, will be more careful around it in the future

 

And on the topic of chemical treatment on plants, i recently discovered that the strawberries i grow at home will go bad even after 2 days in the fridge while the store bought ones last for a week at least. Makes me worry about what they're sprayed with 

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