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DarkSoul

Passiflora Incarnata

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I have several of these plants to sell.

I’m thinking $25 for one or $40 for two or I can workout another deal if you want more. Comes with free express postage.

Only within Australia mainland.

passionflower.jpg

passionflower2.jpg

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i would like on too, and will pm you.

 

a great offer and a rare plant!

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Since most cultivated passionfruit plants are grafted to "wild" root-stock, does anyone happen to know what those "wild" plants probably are? I've taken cuttings from some Brunswick alleyway plants (in Melbourne) that have gone ballistic, the shiny-leafed fruiting varieties alongside their "weedy" root-stock variants -- in full sun the leaves grow a reddish colour. To my shame, I've in the past exterminated "wild passionfruit" vines, probably P. incarnata. 

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Posted (edited)

that's a good question, unspeakable 6 letter nick person....

 

i think to know, that some of the passifloras for eating get grafted onto passiflora caerulea, because of her virgor.

 

vigor?

Edited by withdrawl clinic

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On 12/03/2021 at 12:58 PM, DarkSoul said:

I have several of these plants to sell.

 

I’m thinking $25 for one or $40 for two or I can workout another deal if you want more. Comes with free express postage.

 

Only within Australia mainland.

 

passionflower.jpg

passionflower2.jpg

can you please elaborate the origin of this plant?

 

I have True P incarnata growing wild for the last decade on my land, but sets no fruits, due to lack of cross pollination 

i need a different clone. 

probably means seed import

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On 16/03/2021 at 8:44 PM, fyzygy said:

Since most cultivated passionfruit plants are grafted to "wild" root-stock, does anyone happen to know what those "wild" plants probably are? I've taken cuttings from some Brunswick alleyway plants (in Melbourne) that have gone ballistic, the shiny-leafed fruiting varieties alongside their "weedy" root-stock variants -- in full sun the leaves grow a reddish colour. To my shame, I've in the past exterminated "wild passionfruit" vines, probably P. incarnata. 

 

The most common rootstock used is P. caerulea, as W.C mentioned. It's a bastard of a plant to get rid of once it's invaded.

http://nelliekelly.com.au/faqs-about-passionfruit-vines.html

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On 06/06/2021 at 9:11 PM, Rev said:

can you please elaborate the origin of this plant?

 

I have True P incarnata growing wild for the last decade on my land, but sets no fruits, due to lack of cross pollination 

i need a different clone. 

probably means seed import

 

 

I bought the original plant from All Rare Herbs. That's all I know of the origin. None of my passionflower plants have fruited, they flower but don't develop into fruit. But they sprout pups regularly, which is how I get the extra plants.

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I've just ordered fresh seed from the USA 

 

my plant is a clone from the plant that was in Lismore at the Herb garden at Southern Cross University. That plant is now gone due to construction in that corner of the gardens 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I'd really like to grab some if that's OK.  :)

Edited by Halcyon Daze

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On 08/06/2021 at 10:39 AM, Rev said:

I've just ordered fresh seed from the USA 

 

my plant is a clone from the plant that was in Lismore at the Herb garden at Southern Cross University. That plant is now gone due to construction in that corner of the gardens 

 

 

 

Hey Rev, do you ever get suckers on yours? Perhaps you could layer a couple branches into the ground to extend the life of the plant.

 

Just dig a shallow hole,  bury a section of the vine, and place a rock on top. You never need to actually cut it away from the mother-plant, but if the mother dies off it will not kill the new part that you've layered.

 

Could be worth keeping it alive for as long as possible, especially if you want to do some cross-pollination in the future. 

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the one i recieved, died on me.

 

it showed symptoms of wilting disease.

 

my plant looked reasonably healthy, but showed chlorosis, after the first cold night, she displayed wilting syndrome,

now, she is dead.

 

maybe it was fusarium which killed my specimen, or similar.

in other words, incarnata is very sensitive to fungal/bacterial actions in the soil, which get amplyfied, my the return of the cod season....

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Bugger. I might go check mine, after the last couple cold nights I'm starting to wonder if I should go inside a big plastic tub. But then the high humidity might be no good either. It's in a little humidity dome at the moment. quite small mine, I prolly got the last of the litter. 

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Mine is still going great. Mildest winter in memory up here though.

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Mine's still fine in it's little dome. I did dust it with sulfur when I first got it as there were a few little spider mites. I'm thinking the sulfur may be helping it guard against any fungal issues while inside the dome. The sooner it comes out the better though.

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good discussion here, thx 4 all the input.

i would have loved to grow this plant, but is not to be, i can't work out why...

 

so let me side track, i love incarnata, because it's said to be a mild moi, and many sleep aids (mostly in europ) feature, incarnata.

but instead of going wild, like i hoped, like a passion fruit, you grow in "oz", she acted tricky.

 

i believe passsion flowers have great potential, and are not fully understood yet, by the human animal.

for examle, let me say, as follows, when i was still, hooked on nico smokes, eating passion fruits, would stopp, my craving for baccy, for a while!

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Great to hear, confirmation of existing studies that show passiflora spp. useful in treating various addictions, including nicotine. 

A friend had some (rogue passionfruit rootstock) that was accidentally cut & withered on the vine, in full sun. That batch tasted a lot like tobacco, to me. 

 

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10 hours ago, withdrawl clinic said:

i love incarnata, because it's said to be a mild moi,

 

I heard it can be a handy sub for caapi vine. I wouldn't worry too much about losing yours, there'll be more and more available over time. We just need to find a local seed source really :)

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On 10/07/2021 at 1:54 AM, Halcyon Daze said:

 

I heard it can be a handy sub for caapi vine. I wouldn't worry too much about losing yours, there'll be more and more available over time. We just need to find a local seed source really :)

yeah, i agree.

but good, to tell the crowed, about my troubles, with this plant.

it's was not easy to grow for me.

 

i'm hopefull, seed grown plant's might be not having wilting disease problems.

this is a plant, which i argue is not covered by the "blanket law".

 

i think, people here understand plant herbs (and definately, passilflora incarnata) better than the people who "run" LET'S SAY CHEMIST WAREHOUSE, AND OTHER PHARMAS...

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