Jump to content
The Corroboree
pAcHyReIgN

Rooting bridgesii

Recommended Posts

Hello and thankyou very much for approving my membership request!

 

I have a couple of basic questions about this T. bridgesii monstruosus:

 

IMG_0002a.thumb.jpg.e84a84584f947934371500bf3e6bf21e.jpg

IMG_0003w.thumb.jpg.4283de65a3bc72edd35f681e75a22826.jpg

 

Is this "clone A" or "clone B"?

 

Those things hanging down are roots, right?

 

Can I root the the segments with roots hanging down simply by separating each segment and planting them?

 

I should wait til Spring to do this, right?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome : )

As far as I know clone a is a long form and clone b is a short form so looks like you have a clone b.

They are roots to my knowledge, roots seeking moisture from the air, you can cut and root the segments but better to let the cut heal/callus before planting to minimise possible rot problems, it is wise to have an areola on each cutting so it has a site to branch from.

 

Its a nice sized plant you have, you could turn it into many plants if wanted, grafting speeds up there growth quite a bit from what I have seen.

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh and yeh as far as I know spring/summer is better cause it is in active growth and there is less chance of rot in warmer and drier conditions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great to have you here. Your pictures made me miss living in Belgium. Don't worry about how to root these T. bridgesii. Simply find some good gardening soil and stick your cacti in it. You can take your cuts now and dip the cut ends in sulfur dust. Allow them to dry over the weekend and then place in that nice gardening soil you bought. Don't worry about watering for the first few weeks. Just let it sit in that soil dry. After 2 weeks you can water so that the soil is wet. If you want to spruce things up a bit you can even add 50% perlite to  your gardening soil. For what its worth, I've grown and rooted many T. brigesii this way with no ill effects.  There certainly is no need to wait till any particular time of year for taking a cutting.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi and welcome to SAB. Yes you can root your brid now, no problem. I have rooted several cuttings last winter in germany. I just cut em in september, let them dry for four weeks and than put em in bonedry soil, no water is necessary in winter, because the plant doesent grow. Last winter I rooted several cuts they were decrafted. In spring i have put them in the ground. Usualy winter is not a good time for rooting but i gave it a try, and for me it was fine.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like how we all have our own take on exact days to leave the cut to dry or whether to water after "x" number of weeks or not. What is important to me as a gardener is to find many ways to kill my plants. Only then will I know how far I can push them and how far I can not push them. With that said, @Pedropark has a method that will most assuredly work as well. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, pAcHyReIgN said:

Is this "clone A" or "clone B"?

 

Depends upon who you ask, but from what I have seen there has been movement towards referring to the variations as long/short rather than A/B. This is partly due to the fact that there are probably more than two clone lines currently in existence.  I recall someone around here getting a "TBM" from seed, and it is likely that other growers have done so as well but simply attributed them to an existing "clone" rather than calling them out as a new specimen.  T. bridgesii seems to be pretty prone to various levels of freakishness (various true monstrose types, variegation, crestation, semi-monstrosity/melted wax and numerous combinations of these).

For more info than you probably want check out this thread: http://www.shaman-australis.com/forum/index.php?/topic/41050-monster-and-semi-monster-bridgesii-s-general-phenotype-discussion/

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should have several new plants from this cactus soon :)

 

hmm yea I have a hybrid seedling that looks a bit like a TBM (if that is possible?) - have to wait for it to get a bit bigger to be sure though!

 

Thanks for your replies!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't bother with sulphur dust. Just let the cut dry thoroughly before sticking the cut end into the soil. Thoroughly means at least 2 weeks, preferably a month at room temperature.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/13/2017 at 0:39 PM, Quixote said:

Don't bother with sulphur dust. Just let the cut dry thoroughly before sticking the cut end into the soil. Thoroughly means at least 2 weeks, preferably a month at room temperature.

 

And yet another method that would work. I can say that as I've actually tried these different methods with this particular cacti not once, but many times. The best way to learn though is to actually try many different methods and see what works best for you as there are many opinions on what works. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will be able to tell when it is fully healed, it should be well calloused, the time this takes will vary a little. 

Cuttings can be taken any time of the year but obviously its best to insure your unrooted cutting is dry and protected if it is cold and wet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, bardo said:

You will be able to tell when it is fully healed, it should be well calloused, the time this takes will vary a little. 

Cuttings can be taken any time of the year but obviously its best to insure your unrooted cutting is dry and protected if it is cold and wet.

 

I cold, wet, and open raw flesh is no better than warm, wet, and open raw flesh. Raw open flesh provides a portal of entry for pathogens and wetness in general will allow those pathogens to flourish. Allowing a cacti to scab over if you will for a weekend may not sound like much, but it will provide for a dry scabbed over area of some magnitude. Everything is to a degree of certainty. For instance, if you are certain you can place your cacti in a dry soil after it has scabbed over for such a short period of time this will be different than if you might forget and expose said soil to rain or another source of water. There is absolutely no reason a Trichocereus can not be placed in a dry soil once a few days have elapsed for that initial scab to form.

 

Things that influence a scab or callous formation

Humid or dry air?

Fan/well circulating air or air that does not move?

Old or new scab or callous? And old scab like an old callous will be less prone to open up due to exposure to moisture.

If one applies a wet bandage to a wound it will likely become emaciated and slow the healing process down. The same thing applies with wet soil or wet humid air. 

 

It boils down to understanding why these things happen. How pathogens work. If you create an inhospitable environment by putting a layer of povidone-iodine on a newly closed wound/scab (animals) or sulfur on a newly cut cacti you are essentially creating an inhospitable environment for those pathogens. The less hospital your environment is to pathogens the better up to the point of not being hospitable to your cacti. 

 

Whether you choose to add a rooting hormone to your sulfur dust for your rooted end cuts is up to you. There are many available to help speed up the process. My take on this has always been that while it is not needed it does not hurt. It certainly can't hurt to speed up root development which in the end speeds up growth of the actual cacti. 

 

So my 3 cents, cut

Cut

Dip in sulfur and or rooting hormone

Allow to callous for the weekend or longer at your discretion depending on whether you plan on planting in wet or dry soil

Circulate the air around your cacti cut ends

Dry air is best 

Sun is your friend provided your cacti have been grown in full sun

Avoid rain

When rooting, a warm environment is going to produce faster growing roots than a cold one.

Thus, heat mats, green house, or any other reasonable method one might think of to warm the soil around the roots can help with rooting.

 

Water rooting. You may simply wish to set up your cut end above a jar of water. As long as your cut end/callous remains a cm above the water the roots will grow out of your cacti and into your water slowly. Mark the water level and keep your cacti level and you should have hydroponic roots.

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live on the coast so it's very humid here.  I let my cuttings sit for a month sometimes longer so they can get a very thick callous

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Matagordamudskipper said:

I live on the coast so it's very humid here.  I let my cuttings sit for a month sometimes longer so they can get a very thick callous

Good point bringing up geographical location. For me, I've had good luck letting my Trichocereus bridgessii, T. pachanoi, and T. peruvianus dry out for the weekend in Saint Augustine, Florida before putting them in the dry soil. The arrow marks the spot. As you can see, salt water pretty much surrounds the spot, but its not actually that humid. With that said, I've also done the same in NC and Belgium. All parameters have to be looked at and not just one item or two. You really have to get know your plants. For me, that means trying my best to do them in. Only then will I truly know how far they can be pushed. Please do take note that I listen the exact species I have done this with and don't add any species I have not listed to this list. Also note, I have not lived at that address in a good bit. It looks completely different than when I lived there.

St.Augustine .png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×