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The Corroboree

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hey guys, i was wandering around a small reserve today and identified three distinct acacia variants.


I believe they could all be Acuminatas due to their geolocation (York, W.A), due to them displaying a curve/hook on the end of phyllode, and due to the fact that they all are developing or showing rod-shaped flowers.

 

The problem is I really can't tell which is which subspecies...please help.

 

Specimen 1: 
My guess is Acacia Acuminata Typical Variant (though has very long phyllodes).

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Specimen 2:

My guess is Acacia Acuminata Typical Variant also but some differed version. Does also suit Small Seed Variant but is way out of habitat.

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Specimen 3:

I don't really have a clue...I've never seen a narrow phyllode in person, so can't tell how narrow they get. Looks like a Burkitti but again is way out of habitat. Though this plant and one neighbor were the only ones of this species for kms, and were the only acacias around flowering.

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-omni

:)

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Edited by omnilucident
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4 answers to this question

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The first two are A. acuminata. The narrow phyllode variant of that is no longer considered a separate taxon.

Specimen 3 is something different. It might be A. jibberdingensis. York is west of the main distribution of this species but it has been collected from "the west end of Tammin Reserve". It would require examination under a microscope and/or a look at its pods to be certain.

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3 hours ago, cristop said:

The first two are A. acuminata. The narrow phyllode variant of that is no longer considered a separate taxon.

Specimen 3 is something different. It might be A. jibberdingensis. York is west of the main distribution of this species but it has been collected from "the west end of Tammin Reserve". It would require examination under a microscope and/or a look at its pods to be certain.

Thankyou cristop!, i think A. jibberdingensis. is spot on!

Does that mean there is just the Acuminata species with various sizes of phyllodes?

The first two specimens i showed were quite distinct from one another in habitat, and there were large monopopulations of each type.

Considering you seem to be aware of such things, have you noticed tremendous difference in alkaloid content between those considered narrow and those considered broad?

Edited by omnilucident

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Specimens 1 & 2 look the same to me, but if the plants appear different in the field it could be due to differences in soils or age. For example one population may be on shallow or saline soils. Or maybe one population is mature while the other germinated together after a fire and has yet to reach full maturity. There could also be genetic differences, but without looking at them in situ I'm just speculating.

Phyllodes are narrower in the low rainfall parts of its range. The reason the narrow phyllode variant is no longer deemed a separate taxon would be because phyllodes width varies along a continuum, and other characters don't reliably vary along with it. So there's no clear dividing line.

I wouldn't know about the alkaloid contents. I'd like to think you're not killing too many trees for their bark, particularly if they're on a reserve.

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I only experiment with bark of dead trees and fresh phyllodes/twigs. Thankyou for your help!

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