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lhb2444

Scared loph stock

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A few months ago I bought a couple of grafted lophs and whilst I was away for a month and a bit one of them got pretty smashed by some sort of scale like bug (I should've taken photos of that too but forgot) which has since been treated.

I'm wondering though with nearly all of the stock turning into a scared hard brown surface if it'll affect the growth of the scion?

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It will definitely slow it down a bit since it has less surface area for photosynthesis, but I doubt it would stall out completely.

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I have seen fully callous root stocks work for YEARS before dying. The areas that are callous can still photosynthesize somewhat but not well.

so long as the scion does not kill the root stock it should last for a long time to come.

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I'm wondering though with nearly all of the stock turning into a scared hard brown surface if it'll affect the growth of the scion?

First you need to ascertain what made the stock so afraid.

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to say it would do less a job because of its colour would be racist!

ime calloused/scarred stocks and plants perform as normal. one would think the lack of green would affect photosythesis but it would apear that the requirements are there whether green or not in scar tissues!!!!

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Lack of green would mean less chlorophyl showing to photosynthesize. In my experience with pereskiopsis and grafting once the green skin turns to brown/white skin (even when it's just scar tissue from scale and not corking) the growth rate slows immensely.

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The significant reduction in green photosynthesizing skin was what had me worried but I guess i'll just keep an eye on it and see what happens as I don't have any suitable grafting stock ready at the moment plus its heading into the colder months and I've nowhere to put it once grafted.

"First you need to ascertain what made the stock so afraid."

I think it was extremely afraid of the solid month the scale gave it a beating untreated whilst I was away, was a pretty sad discovery upon returning home :(

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I don't think you'll have a huge reduction in growth rate. Keep us updated.

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I wonder if there is still green chlorophyll underneath the scaring that still allows for light processing. IE: the light energy passes through the scaring still.. and if there is still chlorophyll present underneath then maybe it still processes the light waves. Although im sure there would be some slow down as not ALL the energy is going to pass through the thick scaring.

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First you need to ascertain what made the stock so afraid.

That's exactly right - if you don't know, the fear could return..

Personally though, I'm seeing a little bit of existential anxiety in that stock there perhaps, but nothing I'd go so far as calling actual fright..

Edited by nitrogen
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Yeah shes a little anxious but nothing a nice hot cuppa and TLC can't overcome.

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