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TrailBlazer

Malpighiaceae's In Australia - Names, Taxonomy, Identification and a bloody good yarn. (WIP)

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Malpighiaceae vines that can be found in Australia.

Banisteriopsis caapi "Cielo"

  • Origin:
  • Other Regional Names:
  • Distinctive Features:
  • Folklore / History:
Photos

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Banisteriopsis caapi "Ourinhos"

  • Origin:
  • Other Regional Names:
  • Distinctive Features:
  • Folklore / History:
Photos

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Banisteriopsis caapi "Cascabel / Caupuri"

  • Origin:
  • Other Regional Names:
  • Distinctive Features: Enlarged swollen nodes. Smooth bark
  • Folklore / History:
Photos

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Banisteriopsis caapi "Tucunaca"

  • Origin:
  • Other Regional Names:
  • Distinctive Features:
  • Folklore / History:
Photos

Banisteriopsis Muricata

  • Origin:
  • Other Regional Names: Brujo Vine, Black Caapi
  • Distinctive Features: Silver color under leaves.
  • Folklore / History:
Photos

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Banisteriopsis caapi "Shaman Australis Black"

  • Origin:
  • Other Regional Names:
  • Distinctive Features:
  • Folklore / History:
Photos

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Banisteriopsis caapi "Trueno / Thunder"

  • Origin:
  • Other Regional Names:
  • Distinctive Features: Very rough course cork like bark
  • Folklore / History:
Photos

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Alicia anisopetala

  • Origin:
  • Other Regional Names:
  • Distinctive Features:
  • Folklore / History:
Photos Edited by TrailBlazer
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This will be a comprehensive list of Malpighiaceae's that are to be found getting around our sun burnt country. I am not interested in ones found in the USA or elsewhere, Only down under hey. I am using the family rather than one single species because I am convinced plenty of Malpighiaceae are our friends. Not just banisteriopsis.spp

The reserved posts I will add as other members add and discuss interesting Malpighiaceae and we all come to a close agreement on name and identification and then added to the list at the start. The goal is to have the first couple of posts as a reference for us all with easy and clear information without bullshit and ambiguity and forum topics here and there.

BTW My time is always limited so I will be editing my posts from time to time to add more info and what not. Consider it a work in progress thread boys and girls! :)

Edited by TrailBlazer
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OK so lets do this.

I have a question for Torsten or Toast about the SAB about the "black" Banisteriopsis Caapi sold by SAB.

Do you guys know the origin of this plant & How did the name come about?

Has it ever flowered for you and if it has what color was the flowers?

The plant stands out from others with its more ovate leaf form compared to the typical elliptic leaf shape of other Banisteriopsis Caapi. The nectaries, Both the amount and arrangement is also unique.

I ask because Banisteriopsis Muricata or "Brujo vine" is what IMO Black Caapi is in the Amazon but from photos of B. Muricata vines I have seen the SAB one does not look like B. Muricata.

Of course I could be mistaken and we have the tribal and regional naming who-ha. Thats why I hate to refer to vines as colors but thats why I am asking the questions hey :)

Cheers.

Banisteriopsis Muricata

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Photo by João de Deus Medeiros

BanMurLfFl.jpg

Banisteriopsis Muricata

BanMur.gif

BanMurFrts.jpg

SAB "Black" Caapi photo to come...

Edited by TrailBlazer
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Interesting thread thanks TrailBlazer.

Looks forward to reading more about this fascinating family and seeing some interesting photos..

Mostly looking forward to an answer to the perennial question... is Diplopterys cabrerana in Oz?

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Thanks tarenna, I hope something can come out of it.

For me I think the great diplopterys hunt is over rated hey.

There is hundreds of Malpighiaceae and I would be willing to bet my left nut theres better ones out there than just D. Cabrerana.

We have only just scratched the surface in relation to this genus don't you think? Alicia.spp springs to mind right away.

But to answer your question, If a person had it then why keep it to themselves, It doesn't achieve anything other than a slight advantage in a pissing contest!

Edited by TrailBlazer
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Irie,

Hmmm!? That flowering vine looks exactly like my Cielo strain. Leaf shape, flower color and fade!

The vines I have that I suspect to be Banisteriopsis Muricata, didn't flower for me this year, but the leaves are significantly smaller & have a silver underside.

Respect,

Z

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I have a differing view on this one Zaka - the vine does not look like the cielo strain that I am familiar with in particular the leaf shape and colouration appear different... This thread will obviously be valuable in clarifying comparative features and assisting in accurate IDs of the various Malphigiaceaous species out there. The Harvard University paper is another good resource, particularly for giving clarity to the comparative features of fruit of various spp..

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Irie,

Here's Cielo flowers and seed!

Respect,

Z

The second photo (R.Burnham) that Trailblazer posted, I would agree looks like Muricata!

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Edited by Zaka
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Thank you for your photos zaka it's much appreciated :)

Sorry old mate I read your post wrong so excuse this edit.

Your cielo looks very similar to a B. Caapi I have hey.

Do you have any pictures of your B. Muricata seeds ? I ask because B. Muricata has pink tinted seeds.

What is the origin of your B. Muricata?

Cheers!

Edited by TrailBlazer
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Thanks tarenna, I hope something can come out of it.

For me I think the great diplopterys hunt is over rated hey.

There is hundreds of Malpighiaceae and I would be willing to bet my left nut theres better ones out there than just D. Cabrerana.

We have only just scratched the surface in relation to this genus don't you think? Alicia.spp springs to mind right away.

But to answer your question, If a person had it then why keep it to themselves, It doesn't achieve anything other than a slight advantage in a pissing contest!

75 genera 1300 spp in the Family Malphigiaceae according to wiki. A reasonably large family.

Very interested in the genus Alicia. At least one is on Oz that I am aware of - A. anisopetala. I understand it may well have arrived here labelled as a Diplopterys sp. I have heard mention of a second Alicia sp. being in Oz. Anyone know anything more of this?

In answer to your question - maybe Diplopterys cabrerana is so slow growing (which I understand may well be the case) that there is simply not enough vegetative material to allow for broader distribution and maybe it will be many many years before it flowers in Oz and sets seed? I understand that flowering and fruiting of this species is rare in the wild (although it does happen as evidenced by the line drawings of its fruit in the Harvard paper).

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Irie,

The Plowman fruiting branch looks bangs on!

I have a stigmaphyllon sinuatum.(syn. fulgens)..? That has the red tips to the seeds.

Not sure where the original seed photos are & since it hasn't flower yet I have nothing but leaf pics.

They were sourced from Peru.

I have three vines in the ground & a bunch stuffed under a P.alba forest & forgotten about!

They love to run long on the ground.

Respect,

Z

I have literaly 2 sacks of Alicia seeds! Exporting ain't easy!!!

Edited by Zaka
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75 genera 1300 spp in the Family Malphigiaceae according to wiki. A reasonably large family.

Very interested in the genus Alicia. At least one is on Oz that I am aware of - A. anisopetala. I understand it may well have arrived here labelled as a Diplopterys sp. I have heard mention of a second Alicia sp. being in Oz. Anyone know anything more of this?

In answer to your question - maybe Diplopterys cabrerana is so slow growing (which I understand may well be the case) that there is simply not enough vegetative material to allow for broader distribution and maybe it will be many many years before it flowers in Oz and sets seed? I understand that flowering and fruiting of this species is rare in the wild (although it does happen as evidenced by the line drawings of its fruit in the Harvard paper).

Yeah there is quite few of them hey!

Alicia. anisopetala is spreading out these days everywhere which is a bloody good thing IMHO.

The other you might be refering to is Alicia macrodisca. Both share similarities with some Diplopterys.spp

Theres a few Malpighiaceae to be found down under natively. Some I am aware of are Heteropterys syringifolia, Tristellateia australasiae, Stigmaphyllon ciliatis and Hiptage benghalensis to name a few hey.

Hiptage benghalensis should be ruled out and is a bit of a pain in the ass to be frank haha. Its a weed around here and its quite a bloody challenge removing it manually.

Possibly D. Cabrerana is slow growing but even one length of vine 1m long can yield many cuttings. You only need 1 node to root a new cutting. The more cuttings growing, The more material there is and so on.

Personally I don't think the real one is in Australia, Even the locals in South America seem to have a hard time finding it and making a correct ID. Some of this again boils down to the same problem of tribal naming from region to region.

Anyway the D. Cabrerana down under topic has been done to death in other topics so may be we can leave that out for now. :)

Irie,

The Plowman fruiting branch looks bangs on!

I have a stigmaphyllon sinuatum.(syn. fulgens)..? That has the red tips to the seeds.

Not sure where the original seed photos are & since it hasn't flower yet I have nothing but leaf pics.

They were sourced from Peru.

I have three vines in the ground & a bunch stuffed under a P.alba forest & forgotten about!

They love to run long on the ground.

Respect,

Z

I have literaly 2 sacks of Alicia seeds! Exporting ain't easy!!!

The sure do like to run Zaka! I have a ceilo that has spread over 30 meters from its original planting location.

Life would be bloody grand if exporting and importing was easy!

Sadly that will never be the case for us oztralians :(

Edited by TrailBlazer
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I can't actually remember the source of the black caapi. Might need to do some searches in my emails for hints. or maybe I traded with someone here. sorry, at the time [probably about 6 years or more] I thought the colours thing was all a bit arbitrary and hence didn't keep track of some of the background.

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Zaka would you help out a brother and post some photos of the leaves of your Banisteriopsis Muricata. Top and bottom?

Cheers.

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Irie,

I'll take some photo's later.

In the mean time here a link to the start of the grow from seed.

In this thread, follow the "Black".

The leaves are quite different between the seedling & mature plants.

Respect,

Z

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Irie, (sorry guy's I was mid edit and the net went down for 24)

So this is my B. Muricata. Note the silver underside.
Note the size leaf against the size of a Cielo for comparision.

Also the necture glands compare with the Cielo glands.

Respect,
Z

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Edited by Zaka
fixed typo in plantname, cielo not ceilo
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Thanks for the photos mate! Nice looking vines hey. :)

Your cielo looks nothing like the vine we ozzies have in Australia called cielo. My cielo lacks the silver undersides So the plot thickens!

One aspect of your vine that stands out is the silver undersides of the leaves and the leaf veining which look very close to the B Muricata by plowman photo I posted.

I have been wanting to take some photos of my vines ever since I started this thread but it hasn't stopped pissing down rain since then. Guess I am going to have to take some wet shots hey!

Edited by TrailBlazer
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Banisteriopsis caapi "Cielo" - Australia

Vine Base:

sml_gallery_12778_635_228448.jpg

Vines

sml_gallery_12778_635_72496.jpg

Leaves

sml_gallery_12778_635_100183.jpg

Leaves

sml_gallery_12778_635_167326.jpg

Nectaries

sml_gallery_12778_635_237424.jpg

Bush

sml_gallery_12778_635_161042.jpg

Edited by TrailBlazer
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Banisteriopsis caapi "Ourinhos" - Australia

Vine Base:

sml_gallery_12778_635_56301.jpg

Vine. I love the red colors this vine shows at certain stages of growth.

sml_gallery_12778_635_145036.jpg

Vines

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Leaves

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Leaves

sml_gallery_12778_635_129775.jpg

Nectaries

sml_gallery_12778_635_120787.jpg

Bush

sml_gallery_12778_635_77396.jpg

Ourinhos would be one of my favorite vines for various reasons. It is a true monster hey!

Edited by TrailBlazer
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Banisteriopsis caapi "Cascabel / Caupuri" - Australia

Vine Base:

med_gallery_12778_635_259109.jpg

Vines

sml_gallery_12778_635_410789.jpg

Leaves

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Leaves

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Leaves

sml_gallery_12778_635_124686.jpg

Nectaries

sml_gallery_12778_635_169141.jpg

Edited by TrailBlazer
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awesome pictures, awesome thread!

hmm, how to say this, your nickname somehow fit's with what my research has told me about caapi, in the sence that caapi does produce trails, and concentric trails around round objects, specialy when moved.

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Banisteriopsis caapi "Shaman Australis Black" - Australia

My photos of this vine are not the best brothers and sisters because a tree fell on it and decapitated it hey. It is only now starting to make a come back 12 months later and I thought the bugger was dead. It is around 3-4 years old. If anyone else has better photos then please feel free to contribute them to help the thread. Cheers!

Vine Base:

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Leaves

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Leaves

sml_gallery_12778_635_17388.jpg

Nectaries

sml_gallery_12778_635_189204.jpg

Edited by TrailBlazer
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Thanks for the photos mate! Nice looking vines hey. :)

Your cielo looks nothing like the vine we ozzies have in Australia called cielo. My cielo lacks the silver undersides So the plot thickens!

One aspect of your vine that stands out is the silver undersides of the leaves and the leaf veining which look very close to the B Muricata by plowman photo I posted.

I have been wanting to take some photos of my vines ever since I started this thread but it hasn't stopped pissing down rain since then. Guess I am going to have to take some wet shots hey!

Irie,

SORRY I was mid edit and the net went down for 24hrs

Respect,

Z

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