Jump to content
The Corroboree
Sign in to follow this  
M S Smith

Some T. scopulicola forms

Recommended Posts

This is the stardard everyday T. scopulicola with the extremely short spines.

~Michael~

post-19-1152744154_thumb.jpg

post-19-1152744162_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a plant that came with the name "T. scopulicola FR991." Notice the difference in the length of the spines over the above plant. Also pay attending to their thickness and color for the next post. The spines are relatively thin and yellow/brownish.

~Michael~

post-19-1152744339_thumb.jpg

post-19-1152744355_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now here is the plant the T. scopulicola-like plant that came with the tag "T. cordobensis." Now I know in the past I had suggested a mis-tag of the plant, and that may be still a possibility, but I was looking over my cactus list and was reminded that the tag said it was from Cordoba, Argentina. Now I've emailed Willy Smith, a pro on Argentinean cactus, about this issue (with photos), but he hasn't written back yet. Hopefully he can tell me about whether or not a plant fitting this description does in fact grow in Cordoba, Argentina.

Notice the spines are relatively thick and reddish in color.

~Michael~

post-19-1152744718_thumb.jpg

post-19-1152744750_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does the fingernail, texture test work on all three of the above?

The second plant looks like one of the ones I have, that I have always considered a backeberg. My plant fails the fingernail test.

I do have a few scops that look like the first one posted. They grow REALLY slowly, and are pale green. I left one in the shade, and it is normal trich color. Is this something you have experienced? Could scop be a shade loving cactus in the wild?

Sorry, so many questions...

:blush:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, all three of these have the slightly grainy texture when one draws ones fingernail downwards on it, this as opposed to T. pachanoi, the T. peruvianus sorts, and T. macrogonus sorts, all of which feel like wax (these tests are only good on the new growth, as older sections will seem rough from age).

The scops in the first photo clearly do stay much greener in shaded areas, but I am not sure they get much of that in southern Bolivia. I'm sure they would love shade, but I'm not sure they get much opportunity to enjoy it. I've seen pleny of photos of shade grown plants, and I think they are much more beautiful dark green and fully hydrated. I suppose they are only evolved to be able to survive bright light and severe heat, but this doesn't mean they can't flurish otherwise.

~Michael~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I do have a few scops that look like the first one posted. They grow REALLY slowly, and are pale green. I left one in the shade, and it is normal trich color.

Bizarre. For me the commonly available one's here have been quite fast growing and stayed dark green even in full sun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just testing my upload capacity, but this is pretty much what mine look like.

Found this searching under "peruvianus", it was called "cereus_peruvianus"! :blink:

post-608-1152774432_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Strangebrew,

this is a trichocereus. I´d say it´s a nice big scop. Because of the exact type you´ll better ask michael :blush:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is odd how one can find several species of Trichocereus labled as Cereus peruvianus. it seems some cactus folks still know very little about the group in general.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a standard scopulicola I've got in the ground. It's just been through 2 weeks of nearly constant frosts and low night temps, the worst night being -5C combined with a heavy frost and it pulled through with no problems. In fact all the Trich's coped remarkably well but I don't think the bridgesii would have liked much more. As long as they've stopped growing they all seem capable of handling some frost. Daytime temps are more than 10C.

This would receive at least 6 hours of afternoon sunshine in the growing season and it put on 30+ cms over the last one.

post-608-1152934043_thumb.jpg

Edited by strangebrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When discussing the finnicky details of cacti ID, how often does the idea of hybridisation occur to people? especially when the plants are coming from nurserys not straight out of the wild. Essentually when we take these cacti out of the wild an start to cultivate them don't they slowly become cultivars? therefor not strictly the same plant that was originally sourced from the wild?

I've been thinking about this a fair bit lately as I've been keying out eucalypts, and when it comes to eucalypts, they are damn sluty. do cacti sleep around a bit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been thinking about this a fair bit lately as I've been keying out eucalypts, and when it comes to eucalypts, they are damn sluty. do cacti sleep around a bit?

Indeed they do

Particularly within the Trichocereus it seems however transgeneric hybridisation is not unusual.

Trichocereus is best considered a group of species complexes rather than true species.

I'm sure Rev, MS, and Archaea will have a lot more to say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Essentually when we take these cacti out of the wild an start to cultivate them don't they slowly become cultivars? therefor not strictly the same plant that was originally sourced from the wild?

With the Trichocereus the notion of wild plants may be problematic , many of the types that are now seen as wild seem to be feral populations of ancient cultivars, they have been cultivated for a minimum of 3500 years in many cases, and likely much longer. Still calling them hybrids is problematic. when many are stable intermediates of all manner of combination as well as recently facilitated grex. I grow a few crossed as hybrids, between deliberate cultivars, they tend to be more vigorus than the ones I suspect as being homozygous such as the small spine classic scop form.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my four ribbed T. cordobensis.

~Michael~

post-19-1154194189_thumb.jpg

post-19-1154194208_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is 50 years old T. scopolicola in greenhouse (Berlin)

post-7381-0-29966900-1301932720_thumb.jp

it is spineless, but the seedlings (it was motherplant) have very short spines.

Edited by BBGONE
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BBGone, do you have or could you on your next visit acquire pictures of macrogonus at Berlin-Dahlen? Assuming it is there of course.

Any images of the older form of macrogonus in Germany would be hugely welcomed as well.

Thanks either way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BBGone, do you have or could you on your next visit acquire pictures of macrogonus at Berlin-Dahlen? Assuming it is there of course.

Any images of the older form of macrogonus in Germany would be hugely welcomed as well.

Thanks either way.

Trucha, i live far from Germany.

I'v bought the seedlings on German ebay.

I asked Mario (on ebay his alias is cultureplants), he is the owner of the items, "Can i be assured of their authenticity?".

He sended me that picture, the cactus grows in his greenhouse (near Berlin).

Mario is very good seller (and collector of different plants), and replies a lot of questions.

Edited by BBGONE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks BBGONE for the detailed answer. I'll locate and ask Mario if he can help with this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here is a couple of pics of my boyfriends 4 ribbed t. scop

it has done some trippy rib formations, maybe it thought it was going to get a bigger pot and put out some more ribs then stayed in the same small pot so gave up again

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, pretty flowers. Looks a little bit phallic too perhaps :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey bogfrog, where did that scop come from? Is it a special clone?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it came from a guys collection from dunedin he had had it growing outside for 15 years, but we brought it thru trademe, the owner was over seas and selling to fund his travels so we picked it up from his mum who was looking after his plants

mite be a special clone but i have another scop from red barn which is doing the same little notches so i always assumed it was pretty normal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a 4 ribbed scop that displays female genitalia??!??!

hey bogfrom this is awesome!

I will name my own scop [short-spined] "Pussy" or something like that the very day it does this [it came from oz]

Hey BBGONE, welcome to da forumz

Edited by mutant

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a 4 ribbed scop that displays female genitalia??!??!

hey bogfrom this is awesome!

I will name my own scop [short-spined] "Pussy" or something like that the very day it does this [it came from oz]

Hey BBGONE, welcome to da forumz

Maybe she was a woman in the past life:)

She also has good waist, and flowers at her head.

Beautiful, i would like to talk to her:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a shot of my T. cordobensis I use for clippings...

6069536329_2ae254e60e_o.jpg

I wish I could find a habitat photo of this growing in Cordoba, Argentina, as my tags from NMCR says. Such a pretty plant, but I fear goats.

~Michael~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×