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  1. 3 points
    I read that release as "Emyria will be harvesting the data collected during sessions and will use this for unspecified and possibly non-aligned purposes".
  2. 2 points
    See you there folks, good to see many good SAB locals represented in special Panel
  3. 2 points
    Absolutely fantastic resource. Nice work obtuse! PDF Webpage
  4. 2 points
    It's coming up to that time where The Australian Psychedelic Society - Sydney celebrates Aldous Huxley's seminal Doors of Perception experience on Sunday May 23rd with a day devoted to psychedelic Cactus. Rather than covering all psychoactive cacti, this year we are choosing to focus on celebrating all things San Pedro/Huachuma in keeping with the more prevalent Australian species. We are super excited to be able to host full capacity events again and as such, we expect tickets for this to sell fast so get in while you can ! We will be screening the Aubrey Marcus’ film Huachuma directed by Mitch Schultz. The film is a 45 minute excursion deep into the heart of the Peruvian rainforest to experience the magic of the 3000 year old plant medicine: Huachuma. We will then speak to Mike Jay author of 'Mescaline: A Global History of The First Psychedelic’ about the traditions, customs and rituals of Huachuma culture, Chavin De Huantar, the Western discovery of San Pedro and the cultural implications and consequences for the Indigenous people and preservation of these customs to this day. To complete the day, we are privileged to have an SAB elder many of you may know Tony Davey, presenting a hand-ons demonstration of how to cultivate Trichocereus cacti from tip-cuttings, trunks and seed. Tony will demonstrate the basics of cactus cultivation using different methods and answer any questions the community may have about starting their collection or enhancing their existing gardens. WHEN: Sunday May, 23rd, 13:00-16:00 WHERE: Giant Dwarf Theatre, 280 Cleveland St, Surry Hills NSW 2010 (please note Giant Drwarf have moved a few blocks up since we were there last time) TICKETS: www.giantdwarf.com.au/events/APS FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE: https://www.facebook.com/events/168999428458131
  5. 1 point
    My standard scopulicola produces tiny spines that diminish with age. This one doesn't seem to produce those tiny spines, and barely anything at all in the way of aureoles. I think that's new growth right at the tip. Any thoughts?
  6. 1 point
    Garden States Microdose Fungi Foragers, a panel discussion with local fungi experts from the world of mycology Registration Our fourth Microdose episode, Fungi Foragers, will feature fungi experts in a panel discussion about the world of mycology, covering topics on safety, ecology, and conservation. The Panel will also cover some basic ID tips for the 'active' species such as Psilocybe subaeruginosa, Psilocybe semilanceata and Psilocybe alutacea. Hosted by Nick Wallis & EGA Registration for the Microdose Webcasts are free but donations are encouraged to support EGA's important work (booking fees apply). On Wednesday 26 May 2021 at 8:00 PM to 9:30 PM AEST Synopsis: Autumn in southeast Australia marks the beginning of fungi season; chilly mornings, thick layers of dew, and the appearance of a variety of mushrooms and toadstools. With a change in perspective toward psychoactive fungi, there are now more people than ever out foraging for active mushrooms. With this comes the risks of picking poisonous lookalikes, the potential ecological damage caused by foragers who are perhaps a little over-eager, and what this may cause for long term conservation. There is also the legal risk given the punishments if someone is caught being in possession of said fungi. The panel will also cover some basic ID tips for the 'active' species sound across Australia. This mycological panel will feature Australian mycologists and Myco enthusiasts, Caine Barlow, Beau Meister, Ema Corro, Symon Beck & Darklight, who will discuss issues of safety, ecology, and conservation. The Panel will be facilitated by Jess Saunders. The EGA team have created this very special reference guide for Psilocybe subaeruginosa for the community, Which will be discussed and referred to over the webcast. Bio - Caine Caine Barlow is a fungi educator who has been cultivating and studying fungi for 14 years. In 2019 he completed a Master's degree where his research project was to predict a preliminary conservation status for many Australian fungi. As a fungi educator, he is passionate about encouraging people to see fungi in a new light by demonstrating how easy they are to grow in kitchen and garden environments. He likes to inspire a sense of creativity in the cloning and propagation of mycelium, experimentation with different substrates, and how to hack together equipment. Through exploring the forests of Far South Tasmania, Caine's interest in fungi evolved from foraging to learning how to culture native species for conservation, and on to cultivating a variety of culinary and medicinal species. Then to further studies into mycorrhizal fungi, mycoremediation, and mycorestoration. When not growing fungi, Caine volunteers his time with Entheogenesis Australis, MYCOmmunity Applied Mycology, and the Australian Psychedelic Society. He writes for DoubleBlind and is also a regular contributor, “trusted identifier” and administrator on a variety of fungi oriented website forums and facebook groups. Caine has an Instagram account "Guerrilla Mycology” where he blogs about his cultivation techniques and the enthnomycology of fungi he finds in the field. Bio - Beau Beau Meister (karode13) is a Horticulturist and Mycologist. After studying Horticulture in New Zealand, Beau took an interest in the unusual fungi that grew in the forests there. So little was known about them and this sparked an interest in fungal taxonomy that has lasted for over 20 years. When not out in the field he can be found in his garden tending to a range of Ethnobotanical plants and flowers. Beau has been a moderator of the Mushroom Hunting and Identification and the Ethnobotanical Garden forums on Shroomery.org for over a decade. As well as an admin for the Victorian Fungi group, PMANZ and Victorian Mycophagy group on Facebook. Bio - Ema Ema Corro is a mycologist who believes that the best way to protect the environment is to involve the community in all aspects of science and conservation. Ema loves everything about fungi and is always amazed by their ability to increase people’s sense of connection with the natural world. She is coordinator of MYCOmmunity Applied Mycology which is an organisation that aims to raise awareness of the importance of fungi in health, sustainability and the environment, as well as providing scientific training and resources to the community. She also coordinates the Wild Fungi DNA project which is developing environmental DNA techniques that citizen scientists can use to search for rare and endangered fungi. She is also researching using waste to produce sustainable mycelium-based construction materials. Bio - Symon Beck Symon Beck is a mycoenthusiast with over ten years of experience foraging and eating many different species of fungi on Australia’s East Coast. Symon enjoys targeting new species and seeking out new locations for hunting. He has a particular interest in Psilocybe species and other psychoactive species, and helps run the PMANZ group on Facebook. He has previously guided educational groups in the field, teaching others the basics of fungus identification and plans to continue this in the future. His academic background is in medicine and psychiatry. Bio - Darklight Darklight has been working with aseptic medicinal and endangered plant species propagation for over 20 years. Moving into fungal propagation was a natural progression ( or unfortunate side-effect, you choose. Right now, Darklight is working on long-term archiving of local NNSW fungal species for future remediation and revegetation work- the culture library consists of a fair range of local macrofungi whose ultimate purposes have yet to be revealed to us. But they're here for a reason, and so are we. What fascinates Darklight is the progression of fungal lab technology towards being more accessible to citizen scientists. Kitchen mycology is easy, safe and productive these days. The teks keep getting better and the outputs more diverse and rewarding. Bio - Jess Saunders Jess is a botanical illustrator and tattooer living in Northern Rivers NSW/ Bundjalung country. A love of the natural world, gardening and science have lead her to ongoing involvement in a citizen mycology project, cactus farming, low harm off-grid living and study of plant tissue culture. About EGA Entheogenesis Australis is a charitable, educational organisation established in 2004. We provide opportunities for critical thinking and knowledge sharing on ethnobotanical plants, fungi, nature, and sustainability. Through our conferences and workshops, we aim to celebrate the culture, art, politics and community around medicine plants in the hope to better wellbeing for humankind and the planet. To find out more about what we do, head over to our organisational website. If you like what you see, take a look at our upcoming Garden States 2021 Botanical Conference program. Registration
  7. 1 point
  8. 1 point
    Many SAB folks are helping to make this possible, so it might be like a SAB online plant meet. Should be such a good Panel, See you there
  9. 1 point
    Garden States Microdose Fungi Foragers, a panel discussion with local fungi experts from the world of mycology Registration Our fourth Microdose episode, Fungi Foragers, will feature fungi experts in a panel discussion about the world of mycology, covering topics on safety, ecology, and conservation. The Panel will also cover some basic ID tips for the 'active' species such as Psilocybe subaeruginosa, Psilocybe semilanceata and Psilocybe alutacea. Hosted by Nick Wallis & EGA Registration for the Microdose Webcasts are free but donations are encouraged to support EGA's important work (booking fees apply). On Wednesday 26 May 2021 at 8:00 PM to 9:30 PM AEST Synopsis: Autumn in southeast Australia marks the beginning of fungi season; chilly mornings, thick layers of dew, and the appearance of a variety of mushrooms and toadstools. With a change in perspective toward psychoactive fungi, there are now more people than ever out foraging for active mushrooms. With this comes the risks of picking poisonous lookalikes, the potential ecological damage caused by foragers who are perhaps a little over-eager, and what this may cause for long term conservation. There is also the legal risk given the punishments if someone is caught being in possession of said fungi. The panel will also cover some basic ID tips for the 'active' species sound across Australia. This mycological panel will feature Australian mycologists and Myco enthusiasts, Caine Barlow, Beau Meister, Ema Corro, Symon Beck & Darklight, who will discuss issues of safety, ecology, and conservation. The Panel will be facilitated by Jess Saunders. The EGA team have created this very special reference guide for Psilocybe subaeruginosa for the community, Which will be discussed and referred to over the webcast. Bio - Caine Caine Barlow is a fungi educator who has been cultivating and studying fungi for 14 years. In 2019 he completed a Master's degree where his research project was to predict a preliminary conservation status for many Australian fungi. As a fungi educator, he is passionate about encouraging people to see fungi in a new light by demonstrating how easy they are to grow in kitchen and garden environments. He likes to inspire a sense of creativity in the cloning and propagation of mycelium, experimentation with different substrates, and how to hack together equipment. Through exploring the forests of Far South Tasmania, Caine's interest in fungi evolved from foraging to learning how to culture native species for conservation, and on to cultivating a variety of culinary and medicinal species. Then to further studies into mycorrhizal fungi, mycoremediation, and mycorestoration. When not growing fungi, Caine volunteers his time with Entheogenesis Australis, MYCOmmunity Applied Mycology, and the Australian Psychedelic Society. He writes for DoubleBlind and is also a regular contributor, “trusted identifier” and administrator on a variety of fungi oriented website forums and facebook groups. Caine has an Instagram account "Guerrilla Mycology” where he blogs about his cultivation techniques and the enthnomycology of fungi he finds in the field. Bio - Beau Beau Meister (karode13) is a Horticulturist and Mycologist. After studying Horticulture in New Zealand, Beau took an interest in the unusual fungi that grew in the forests there. So little was known about them and this sparked an interest in fungal taxonomy that has lasted for over 20 years. When not out in the field he can be found in his garden tending to a range of Ethnobotanical plants and flowers. Beau has been a moderator of the Mushroom Hunting and Identification and the Ethnobotanical Garden forums on Shroomery.org for over a decade. As well as an admin for the Victorian Fungi group, PMANZ and Victorian Mycophagy group on Facebook. Bio - Ema Ema Corro is a mycologist who believes that the best way to protect the environment is to involve the community in all aspects of science and conservation. Ema loves everything about fungi and is always amazed by their ability to increase people’s sense of connection with the natural world. She is coordinator of MYCOmmunity Applied Mycology which is an organisation that aims to raise awareness of the importance of fungi in health, sustainability and the environment, as well as providing scientific training and resources to the community. She also coordinates the Wild Fungi DNA project which is developing environmental DNA techniques that citizen scientists can use to search for rare and endangered fungi. She is also researching using waste to produce sustainable mycelium-based construction materials. Bio - Symon Beck Symon Beck is a mycoenthusiast with over ten years of experience foraging and eating many different species of fungi on Australia’s East Coast. Symon enjoys targeting new species and seeking out new locations for hunting. He has a particular interest in Psilocybe species and other psychoactive species, and helps run the PMANZ group on Facebook. He has previously guided educational groups in the field, teaching others the basics of fungus identification and plans to continue this in the future. His academic background is in medicine and psychiatry. Bio - Darklight Darklight has been working with aseptic medicinal and endangered plant species propagation for over 20 years. Moving into fungal propagation was a natural progression ( or unfortunate side-effect, you choose. Right now, Darklight is working on long-term archiving of local NNSW fungal species for future remediation and revegetation work- the culture library consists of a fair range of local macrofungi whose ultimate purposes have yet to be revealed to us. But they're here for a reason, and so are we. What fascinates Darklight is the progression of fungal lab technology towards being more accessible to citizen scientists. Kitchen mycology is easy, safe and productive these days. The teks keep getting better and the outputs more diverse and rewarding. Bio - Jess Saunders Jess is a botanical illustrator and tattooer living in Northern Rivers NSW/ Bundjalung country. A love of the natural world, gardening and science have lead her to ongoing involvement in a citizen mycology project, cactus farming, low harm off-grid living and study of plant tissue culture. About EGA Entheogenesis Australis is a charitable, educational organisation established in 2004. We provide opportunities for critical thinking and knowledge sharing on ethnobotanical plants, fungi, nature, and sustainability. Through our conferences and workshops, we aim to celebrate the culture, art, politics and community around medicine plants in the hope to better wellbeing for humankind and the planet. To find out more about what we do, head over to our organisational website. If you like what you see, take a look at our upcoming Garden States 2021 Botanical Conference program. Registration
  10. 1 point
    As luck would have it, yes they are. Here's the remaining list $5 - Macrogonus Matucana Peru, Lance x HSP, Super Pedro x R2, Pallarensis, Scop x Anna, Santaensis Pumacayan, Candicans and an unknown. $10 Scop, Pach x Helen, MB Scop x J2, MB Scop x J2 (grafted), Scop x Rosei2 and an unknown bridgesii. $15 Bridgesii x Red Huascha, (Scop x Bridge) x Pach, Yowie x Rosei2, Macro x Psycho0 Just PM me with whatever interests u.
  11. 1 point
    Any of these still avail? Macrogonus Matucana Peru --- Lance x HSP --- Super Pedro x R2 --- Scop x Anna --- Santaensis Pumacayan
  12. 1 point
    This is a pretty awesome podcast from crime pays botany doesn't about some pretty cool research by Dr. Jason Slot. Hope this link works https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9qb2VibG93ZS5wb2RiZWFuLmNvbS9mZWVkLnhtbA/episode/am9lYmxvd2UucG9kYmVhbi5jb20vMjQ0NjhjNjUtM2EwMy0zN2Y5LTkxN2ItMzZmNjUyNTkyNmQ0?ep=14
  13. 1 point
    I have coveted this trichocereus for the last 2 years and today was my day. I got a nice sized piece and I'd like to know what others think about it's ID. I've always considered it a bridgesii, although it is VERY fat for a bridgesii, (it's fat for a PC pachanoi for christs sake!), it is planted in the ground and has been for at least 15 years. You'll notice it has basically no spines on the top half of each of the columns but the bottom parts have some pretty gnarly spines, usually 2 per each areole, sometimes 2 large ones and one small one. You can also see it next to another more normal, (but certainly not a small), bridgesii I also got today. The column I was given has big spines on the bottom 12 inches but is basically as spineless as a scop on the top 3 or 4 feet. There are a few areoles on the "spineless" part that have tiny spines about 1 or 2 mm long, but most are completely bare. I've included come close up pics of the areoles with really tiny spines. Please look at the pics and let me know what you think it may be. I think it could just be a unique form of bridgesii but I would like opinions. The flower hair was quite dark black when I saw them last summer but I have no pics of those for you. Also, it's about 5 or 6 metres high and the flowers were right up the top. BE AWARE THE PICS ARE A DECENT SIZE if you happen to be on a slow connection. I have made them smaller but tried to keep some quality in them so detail can be seen. BTW - also happy to hear what people think of the other bridgesii if it happens to jump out as similar to anything you know. But mainly interested in this weird, fat, sometimes spineless, sometimes spiny one. And here are some pics of the cut I got. It's next to the other bridgesii in these.
  14. 1 point
    Seems I somewhat succeeded, 1 of the flowers I hand pollinated has produced a seed pod.
  15. 1 point
    Hey all Interested in any home grown Trichocereus or Echinopsis coloured flower seed hybrids out there, I like the idea of growing stuff from home gardens. If you have anything post it here please, others might be keen too. Cheers
  16. 1 point
    OMG, BELIEVE THE HYPE!!!! My new favorite cactus of all time and I'm not kidding Lorraine is an absolute 'MUST HAVE' Aussie treasure! Thanks for discovering this one, zed. Looks like a lot of grafting ahead of me...
  17. 1 point
  18. 1 point
    How's the magic clothespeg looking these days?
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
    Welcome. I greet you in the love and light. I just wanted to share my first attempts at Dichoric Glass Prism Art. Have a great day. Love & Light ♾
  21. 1 point
    Dude it was awesome! Yeah pushed the limits of the old Healer's Tent, but the crowd were super kind and tolerant of my ranting. There was a lady there filming for a doco she is making, so I'll try and find a link or some such to said chat... Yeah, fuckn cops were the low light for me. It also spun me out hard to see SO many people filing and watching the protest, from the wrong side of the barricades. Grab a sign and have a go for the cause I say! Thanks for coming out man, I appreciated all of the support I got. Heaps of posi vibes all round. Can't wait for next year!
  22. 1 point
    Where do I begin and end? An interesting exercise I like to go through is to think about where I start and end. From a purely physical point of view, is my body a part of me? If I answer "yes", where does my body begin? What are my physical boundaries? I suppose it is obvious to some that my body has a torso, head, arms, legs etc. What about my hair and nails? They are part of my body and grow from my body, but what about after I have shed them? Are they still part of me then? What about the food I eat? Is it a part of me before I eat it? Is it a part of me while I am digesting it? What about my waste? Is it a part of me while I carry it inside my body? If so, is it still part of me after I have expelled it? Is my boundary defined as my skin edges? What about the warmth my body generates that surrounds me? Is that part of me? My breath? What about my senses? What are my senses? Are they also bound to the perception of the "external"? If I see and hear and taste and smell, are the sensations part of me? Does that extend to the source of the perception? I can see the Sun, where does the sun end and "me" begin? I can hear a long way into the distance, does the sound I perceive exist without me perceiving it? If not, does that make it part of me? What of my memories? What of others' memories of me? Are memories of me part of me? If I existed at all and memories are part of me, can I ever be non existent? When did I begin as a body? I was born, but I grew into a body before I was born. The parts that came together to create my body existed before I was created in my parents, and their parents before them... When does my body stop being part of me? When I die? If so, is my body like my hair and nails and waste? Part of me until I shed it? If so, is my body me at all if I can shed it and still exist? I don't have any answers.
  23. 1 point
    I just got altissima hard Good work Sagi
  24. 1 point
    The photos don’t really do it any justice. Here is a YouTube clip for those interested in the process and the results that can be achieved. https://youtu.be/1HVAS4gA_lc
  25. 1 point
    knobbyness aside, imho the most distinguishing feature of ss02 is twin parallel spines, keyword being parallel. heres how she looks growing in my garden In the mature ss02xss01 mama plant, one can definitely see the ss02 parallel spines in tip growth on mature stems
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