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Part Of My Own Personal "Philosophy"


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#1 ace1928

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Posted Yesterday, 09:52 PM

There is nothing which states that science and spirituality cannot agree as well as justify the explanation. I have no issues with spirituality and people having their own personal views and beliefs. I do have a problem with ungrounded spiritually or supernaturally based explanations or rationalisations for phenemona, subjects or questions which are already understood.

It is so damaging to younger minds and can lead people down incredibly dangerous, unstable and unproductive paths. And I do not mean unproductive in the sense of working a normal conforming lifestyle or job or whatever. I mean unproductive for the individuals character and foundation in reality.

There is so much wonder and beauty in all that is around us. And there is so much to learn and understand. Why can that not just be enough? There are more natural phenomena to learn about, experiment with and understand than anyone could ever possibly cover in their lifetime. Hell I would dare risk going so far as to say that it is unlikely that our species will reach a point of "getting" it all. There is just so much out there.

You don't need to add supernatural interdimensional unexplainable intangible phenomena to the list to make things any more astounding. You just need to look at things around you in a methodical and logical manner and you will see so much.

Open your mind. Be willing to admit that you may have been wrong about your personal beliefs. Be willing to risk testing ideas and theories out in a consistent manner. Be willing and embrace being wrong (how else do you learn?). If there is some other dimension to worry about in the "next life" then worry about it then. Don't waste this life fretting about things that, if you believe, are waiting in your future anyway.

Just where I'm coming from with things. My view is constantly changing and evolving and I am often wrong. I have been heavily involved in pseudo scientific investigation and conversation in my past and have since realised, and honestly laughed at, my own personal ignorance. Its a tough road but a very fulfilling one.


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We can only hope to progress into the future if we truly embrace that which nature has given us


#2 Anodyne

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Posted Yesterday, 11:23 PM

Nicely put ace. :)

 

I don't understand the people who think that spirituality & science are incompatible. To me, science attempts to explain consensus reality, spirituality attempts to explain internal personal reality. No one else can understand your subjective reality, it's unique to you & your personal experiences - so it seems silly to me to be looking for answers to that stuff from other people. They might be able to help, just don't expect anyone else to translate it all into your internal world - they can't, because it's your reality, not theirs.

 

Also "science" is not a thing. It's not an alternative to religious faith, it's not a set institution (or shouldn't be, anyway). It's just a way of thinking about things, and then checking your thinking. Nothing more. But it's a good way of thinking about things. To quote Doctor Who “There's something here that doesn't make sense. Let's go and poke it with a stick.”

 

My own personal philosophy is some kind of scientific nihilism - and I know that people tend to think of nihilism as some kind of depressing emo "life is meaningless" philosophy, but I think they totally miss the point. To me, it just means that there is no absolute meaning, no gods or others who define right & wrong & the meaning of life for us - and I guess you could take that starting point and say "woe is me, nothing means anything". Or you could choose to take it as a moral & philosophical blank slate, and decide to create your own worldview. To me, if there's no pre-assigned meaning to things, then you have to go looking for it for yourself.

 

So, I ask questions - most of them are stupid questions. I experiment & poke things with sticks - most of them fail, some of them poke back. But sometimes I learn things, or at least learn how to ask the questions to learn things. Curiosity feeds more curiosity. Maybe I'm just spiritually deficient here, but I truly can't think of a more meaningful way to spend your life, than looking at the world & trying to learn more about it.


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#3 LokStok

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Posted Yesterday, 11:42 PM

 how do you tell spirituality from "ungrounded spirituality"



#4 Sally

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Posted Yesterday, 11:44 PM

Realising you are wrong is a spiritual awakening in itself.

 

Learning not to speak in absolutes gives room for a graceful exit without loosing face.

 

Replacing terms like "is" with something like "seems to be" or the "data seems to indicate"  etc can also give the author/speaker enough displacement from their opinions to allow a concept to evolve without the need for the ego to move in and make a stand to defend an absolute or fallacious statement.

 

Anyway I "is" not drunk enough for philosophy :wink:, so I will let it go.

:shroomer:


Edited by Sally, Yesterday, 11:45 PM.

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Roses are red

That part is true

But violets are purple

Not fucking blue


#5 ace1928

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Posted Today, 12:00 AM

 how do you tell spirituality from "ungrounded spirituality"

I suppose when the spirituality becomes potentially damaging, misleading, segregating etc etc.
I don't thinkg "ungrounded spirituality" is properly defined though. Just my own little term :P


We can only hope to progress into the future if we truly embrace that which nature has given us


#6 ace1928

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Posted Today, 12:01 AM

Nicely put ace. :)

 

I don't understand the people who think that spirituality & science are incompatible. To me, science attempts to explain consensus reality, spirituality attempts to explain internal personal reality. No one else can understand your subjective reality, it's unique to you & your personal experiences - so it seems silly to me to be looking for answers to that stuff from other people. They might be able to help, just don't expect anyone else to translate it all into your internal world - they can't, because it's your reality, not theirs.

 

Also "science" is not a thing. It's not an alternative to religious faith, it's not a set institution (or shouldn't be, anyway). It's just a way of thinking about things, and then checking your thinking. Nothing more. But it's a good way of thinking about things. To quote Doctor Who “There's something here that doesn't make sense. Let's go and poke it with a stick.”

 

My own personal philosophy is some kind of scientific nihilism - and I know that people tend to think of nihilism as some kind of depressing emo "life is meaningless" philosophy, but I think they totally miss the point. To me, it just means that there is no absolute meaning, no gods or others who define right & wrong & the meaning of life for us - and I guess you could take that starting point and say "woe is me, nothing means anything". Or you could choose to take it as a moral & philosophical blank slate, and decide to create your own worldview. To me, if there's no pre-assigned meaning to things, then you have to go looking for it for yourself.

 

So, I ask questions - most of them are stupid questions. I experiment & poke things with sticks - most of them fail, some of them poke back. But sometimes I learn things, or at least learn how to ask the questions to learn things. Curiosity feeds more curiosity. Maybe I'm just spiritually deficient here, but I truly can't think of a more meaningful way to spend your life, than looking at the world & trying to learn more about it.

So many things you've said there I wish I had said in my original post lol.
You summed it up better than I did :P


We can only hope to progress into the future if we truly embrace that which nature has given us


#7 Anodyne

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Posted Today, 01:50 AM

There is so much wonder and beauty in all that is around us. And there is so much to learn and understand. Why can that not just be enough? There are more natural phenomena to learn about, experiment with and understand than anyone could ever possibly cover in their lifetime. Hell I would dare risk going so far as to say that it is unlikely that our species will reach a point of "getting" it all. There is just so much out there.

You don't need to add supernatural interdimensional unexplainable intangible phenomena to the list to make things any more astounding. You just need to look at things around you in a methodical and logical manner and you will see so much.

Yeah sorry for just jumping into your personal philosophy thread, glad that turned out ok, lol. This bit I've quoted above especially struck a chord, I said almost exactly the same thing here a few months ago:
 

...The study of evolution, symbiosis, etc has so many awesome accidents and mysteries, and examples of incredible biological elegance too... I just get baffled when people try to make it even more complicated. I feel like saying "this critter over here has evolved the ability to create its own light! Isn't that amazing enough? Why bring concepts like purpose & meaning & cosmic plans into it? Can't it just be?"

 

 

Another thought on the idea of spiritual-scientific compatibility came from something Kim Stanley Robinson wrote, along the lines of  "Religious people think that scientists are opposed to their religion - Scientists just don't believe in anything without evidence. If someone could scientifically prove the existence of God, then scientists would simply go "alright then, we believe in God now" ". (which I think was a bit of wishful thinking on his part, given the amount of blind faith people have in "Science", but nevermind that for the moment..)  This is pretty much how I think about most supernatural stuff - if someone proves the existence of ghosts or aliens or Naglfar tomorrow well that's cool, it's not going to upset my worldview too much to believe in them. But until that happens, I'm going to spend my time on all the weird & amazing & beautiful things that we do have evidence for. There are species of bioluminescent fungi that only have glow-in-the-dark spores! There are orchids that synthesise oxycodone!


Into this wild abyss the wary fiend stood on the brink of Hell and looked a while, pondering his voyage.