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Acacia id from Greening australia QLD


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#1 Stillman

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 08:24 AM

I have a nice size accacia I put in about 18 months ago but have lost my records of what it is, I bought the seedling from the greening Australia nursery at the gap. Here is a link to the species they sell
http://www.qld.green...rch/species.asp

and here are some pics, it hasn't flowered for me yet but can't be too far away from it.
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I was thinking it may be a Acacia melanoxylon (Blackwood) from vague memory of the scientific tag more than anything. I know I bought it because it was abutterfly attracting plant with the larvae and ants having some sort of symbiotic relationship? Anyway if anyone can ID it I would be much appreciated.
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#2 dionysus

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 09:34 AM

acacia melanoxylon i believe has rough bark. acacia implexa (lightwood) is similar in appearance and often co-existing but with a smoother bark surface (like yours has), both grow as comparatively large trees for australian acacias. i'm not quite up to the acacia knowledge of some, and as such won't even try to suggest what your plant may be, but i hope my information was still helpful.

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#3 Stillman

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 09:47 AM

interesting I was wondering about the bark I'll google it thanks .I thought it may still have "juvenile" bark (for want of a better word.) I have a friend who is an environmental engineer and he is going to send me a link to a website that has a Key for various australian natives. I think without flowers or seed pods they are pretty hard to id Although some are more obvious than others.
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#4 dionysus

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 10:00 AM

there are some pretty young blackwoods around my area (there are only 6 wattles endemic to my area, all pretty easy to differentiate) that already have some pretty gnarley bark but it may be environmental that they are like that so early, i'm not sure, so it could be that yours are just at an earlier stage of development. blackwoods also have a habbit of growing really straight and tall, which may be an easy way to differentiate it from others from that suppliers stock list, as yours appears to be growing rather straight up

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#5 tarenna

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Posted 19 January 2012 - 10:06 PM

Looks quite like A. melanoxylon to me.
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