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psychotria viridis identification

psychotria viridis shipibo amiruca

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#26 rahli

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 11:53 AM

i was told by the person who gave me this nexus seedling, that, a seedling grown from an original nexus, displays the same characteristics as the original. but i can't veryfie this.


Hey plantheper, good to hear that the Psychotria "nexus" is finally producing seeds for someone. Mine has been producing a heap of flowers for over a year now and not produced one seed. I've even tried pollinating nexus flowers with P. viridis and got nothing.

I'd love to see a pic of a P. "nexus" laden with berries.

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#27 Zaka

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 08:39 AM

I found an interesting forum, if someone can read portuguese (Quetzal ?). A thread on the differents varieties of chacruna they cultivate in Brazil, fascinating !
http://plantasenteog...tificacao.3452/

Irie Mauve,
Excellent link!!!
Damn, if someone could skank the info & translate over to here that would great....
Looks like alot of good info there!
Respect,
Z
PS interesting the #6 roxo has fine hairs....sure I saw this discussed somewhere???

Edited by Zaka, 29 February 2012 - 08:42 AM.


#28 shruman

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 08:59 AM

Does the cafezinho look like carth or alba to anyone else? from Mauves link.
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#29 planthelper

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 09:18 AM

Hey plantheper, good to hear that the Psychotria "nexus" is finally producing seeds for someone. Mine has been producing a heap of flowers for over a year now and not produced one seed. I've even tried pollinating nexus flowers with P. viridis and got nothing.

I'd love to see a pic of a P. "nexus" laden with berries.


late edit: attention, below statment, was found to be incorrect, pls see #37

let me add a few more things, regarding my seed grown nexus.
when the person gave me the small seedling, i said, chances are that, a seedling of an original nexus, might not display the same characters as the mother, and the person replied, no you will see, they are good!
this member if i remeber correctly, studies botany, so i think,, he knows what, he is saying.
anyway, this seedling, displays more virgor than, the other viridis i got, but not the 5 times faster, as some over enthusiastic members reported here.

i remove all the flowers on viridis, but as said before i will leave some, for id'ing purpose.
so a pic of a viridis, ladden with fruit will never come from me.

Edited by planthelper, 02 March 2012 - 09:43 AM.

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#30 shruman

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 10:21 AM

Heres the google translated page, not that great but gives you an idea:

http://translate.goo...o.3452/&act=url

I like this tidbit:

"Each one has its special power, do not say that one eh stronger than the other but all have their mystery.
The fruits are of course useful chacronas purchases, but not to the animal kingdom. They are not edible and not of anything. When I go to prepare and gather the leaves, I take all the berries one week before, because the berries with a spoon leaf loses a bit of light, something not very significant, but over time you will see that the berries are taken from the ideal h to harvest the leaves. jah tried to do the deed with the berries, but eh insignificant."
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#31 Marcel

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 10:53 AM

anyway, this seedling, displays more virgor than, the other viridis i got, but not the 5 times faster, as some over enthusiastic members reported here.


Hey! I think you're referring to me! I still stand by my claim (I think I actually said 3 times faster in that other thread), but add that I'm in temperate Sydney, where P. viridis don't do as well as up in the tropics. This summer, my P. viridis (seedlings) put on a couple of centimetres, while my Nexus (slightly older plants) have put on over 20cm. These proportions are the same for leaf cuttings I did for both types of Psychotria 2 months ago. I'm sure the differences aren't as pronounced in warmer and wetter climates, but down here the P. alba genetics of the Nexus certainly add to their vigour.

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#32 whitewind

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 07:14 PM

http://plantasenteog...tificacao.3452/

English translation for the lazy. Lovely thread.

...

I create this topic in order to show that I'm growing six species and several to several years. I make it clear here and implied as well, that'll put the names that may or may not be those of his region, and these names I've known for a considerable time, so we will not create polemics, disrespect, and so contribute to the growth of PE.

1-An elf-ear
2-caboclinha
3-cabocla
4-dripped white
5-coffee
6-Black Eye

1 - Elf ear (the smallest species of leaf chacrona)
2 - caboclinha (too small, many people confuse with elf ears, but the more chubby caboclinha)
3-cabocla (very different from caboclinha because cabocla eh tb very common as the white chacrona (dripped), but she does not chubby but well-winding)
4-chacrona white or dripped (eh the most common and most diverse in the preparation, the interns are beautiful white)
5-coffee (the edges of the leaves are medium irregular, resembling the leaves of the cafe)
6-black eye (the eye of the leaf springs and internal purple eh tb)

different sizes, different shapes
different lights, different growth
beauties and different

I took each sheet to identify for the brothers, and these sheets do not think that will be left behind or forgotten plays, they will get a glass of water for one month or until the roots come out, then will be placed in the ground until half of the leaf, and then give 1 year or later will have a 4 year jah leaves and will be ready for the forest.

have others that are not there ... native ones that I mentioned in another topic ... hit any time and put some photos here!

Then Self, do not have any native, despite living in the forest, were all planted. But I have no intention of cultivating the others, give me these are the special, the chacronas that searched for years and years, and hj can admire them and climb on top of them with macaquitos

Each one has its special power, do not say that one eh stronger than the other but all have their mystery.
The fruits are of course useful chacronas purchases, but not to the animal kingdom. They are not edible and not of anything. When I go to prepare and gather the leaves, I take all the berries one week before, because the berries with a spoon leaf loses a bit of light, something not very significant, but over time you will see that the berries are taken from the ideal h to harvest the leaves. jah tried to do the deed with the berries, but eh insignificant.

will be all these varieties of the species are chacrona Psychotria viridis?? or some may be Psychotria Psychotria alba or carthagenensis. ? ?

was last in the community of Matutu, southern mines, the world. of Aiuruoca, I was presented with two changes of the queen, they seem to this variety of elf ears, because the leaves were pale green and elongated through. a poko different from queens I have at home. I believe to be caboclinhas.

All are Psychotria viridis! queens of light!

Edited by whitewind, 29 February 2012 - 07:16 PM.


#33 rahli

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 07:19 PM

let me add a few more things, regarding my seed grown nexus.
when the person gave me the small seedling, i said, chances are that, a seedling of a original nexus, might not display the same characters as the mother, and the person replied, no you will see, they are good!
this member if i remeber correctly, studies botany, so i think,, he knows what, he is saying.


Who ever this member is I hope they took photos because these would be the first P. nexus berries and subsequent seedling in history. If this is the case I'm sure they would be more than willing to share some photos of the berries and seedlings and information on the viability of flowers and seeds. I'm also heaps jelous that my plants have not seeded yet so I'm sure they will love rubbing it in.

Cheers

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#34 planthelper

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 09:32 AM

Hey! I think you're referring to me! I still stand by my claim (I think I actually said 3 times faster in that other thread), but add that I'm in temperate Sydney, where P. viridis don't do as well as up in the tropics. This summer, my P. viridis (seedlings) put on a couple of centimetres, while my Nexus (slightly older plants) have put on over 20cm.


somebody said 5 times as fast, and i don't think it was you.

Who ever this member is I hope they took photos because these would be the first P. nexus berries and subsequent seedling in history. If this is the case I'm sure they would be more than willing to share some photos of the berries and seedlings and information on the viability of flowers and seeds. I'm also heaps jelous that my plants have not seeded yet so I'm sure they will love rubbing it in.

Cheers


this member, is not very active on the forum, but i'll pm him and see what he has to say.
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#35 tarenna

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 12:21 PM

Yes agree with Rahli.

Many nexus have flowered but there is currently no evidence of fruit formation. This is despite at least a few active attempts at pollination. I have only ever so recently heard that there MAY be fruit-set in some of the original plants that were hand pollinated with viridis. Further evidence of this is yet to be forthcoming.

#36 GiBBz

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 07:05 PM

Just out of curiosty how old are the plants in the first post?

#37 planthelper

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 09:39 AM

Just out of curiosty how old are the plants in the first post?


i don't know exactly, because i recieved two of them, when they were a bit smaller, and don't know how long they stayed in torts nursery.
the other one, the so called common, stayed with my friends, whilst i was travelling, and was totaly neglected, and started growing from the bottom up again. plants that size, i guess take about 16 months from cuttin stage, to get that big, in my climat.
this might be interressting to mention, this neglected viridis, looked dead when i came back, all above ground growth was dried up, but it did re shoot, when the rains had arrived!! so big viridis can re grow after a drought!!

Who ever this member is I hope they took photos because these would be the first P. nexus berries and subsequent seedling in history. If this is the case I'm sure they would be more than willing to share some photos of the berries and seedlings and information on the viability of flowers and seeds. I'm also heaps jelous that my plants have not seeded yet so I'm sure they will love rubbing it in.

Cheers


mea culpa, mea culpa, my nexus is a cutting and not a seedling!
i guess when plant friends meet, they try to exchange as much info as possible and some things could be understood wrongly.
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#38 rahli

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 06:21 PM

mea culpa, mea culpa, my nexus is a cutting and not a seedling!
i guess when plant friends meet, they try to exchange as much info as possible and some things could be understood wrongly.


What a shame, I was hoping you were right. I hope the P. nexus does produce fertile fruit for someone one day.

Thanks for looking into this planthelper.

cheers.

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#39 mauve

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 02:16 AM

Thank you for the translation, Whitewind ! Very useful !
I note that the brazilian grower stressed the importance of taking off the flowers for a better alkaloidal content (and obviously leaf production). Also that he didn't found any psychoactive use for the berries.

the other one, the so called common, stayed with my friends, whilst i was travelling, and was totaly neglected, and started growing from the bottom up again.


The "common" Psychotria viridis=...of the jungle seeds= ecuadorian strain "amiruca". Common only in Australia ! :P
http://forums.ayahua...hp?f=28&t=26921
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#40 rahli

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 08:59 AM

Hey mauve. Great thread you linked to there. You sure have put a lot of effort into tracking down what we think of as a common plant. Makes me realise once again how special our common strain really is. Given the information you have put forth I am convinced that you are correct in your conclusion.

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#41 whitewind

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 09:27 AM

Hi mauve! No problem, I can't always get an easy translation and I figured other people might be the same. Also, I like multiple copies of useful information in case something happens to a source and it gets lost.

I was quite interested in this post at the bottom of the thread:




Re. Amiruca

by pinkoyd » Thu Mar 01, 2012 5:22 am


Hey guys,

Thanks for taking notice of my posts over at the Nook. Posted Image

I had completely forgotten about Archidona, and the OTJ seeds may have in fact been collected there, in which case we have extended the range of that particular population by several thousand miles!

Of the four gentetic individuals I have there are two distinct forms. One is the classic slender leaved variety posted in the pics above. This form has oblong or egg-shaped berries.

The other form has leaves that are broader at the tip, making a less sharp point. The berries on these are more spherical.

Both forms are from the same collection of seed, and so simply represent some genetic variation within the species.

Just thought you might be interested!



I wondered if anyone else had discovered obvious variation in seedling grown plants? I remember growing some for T from viridis growing in close proximity (touching) of alba and carthaginensis, hoping for a Nexus style hybrid, but all of the seedlings looked like straight (Amiruca) viridis, except for possibly one. I don't know what happened to these as I left them all with T as small plants.

#42 rahli

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 10:12 AM

I grew some seedlings from the common strain seeds last year and sold them in this thread - http://www.shaman-au...showtopic=29433

I kept a few plants from that batch with the 3 biggest now around 400mm. All of the plants have the characteristic narrow pointed leaves.

I have found that this strain produces broader leaves while still maintaining the acuminate leaf tip when grown in the shade. Plants grown hard in the full sun tend towards narrower leaves with the sharp pointed tip. I suspect this is so the plant can better retain water through reduced transpiration potential. Given the ideal condition in which I grow I have some of the very small seedling growing in full sun and they have all tended towards the narrow leaf form. I don't have a camera right now for pics but I will get some up soon.

I also have some seed grown Psychotria "NN" supplied by Kiwiboancaya in this thread - http://www.shaman-au...showtopic=25930 (for some reason the pic of the seeds has been edited out of the thread) Here is the photo of the seed

Attached File  nn.JPG   279.7KB   2 downloads


And one is starting to flower. I'll get a pic up once the flowers open. I am going to try to cross this plant with the P. nexus and see if there is any more luck getting her to pop a berry.

Edited by rahli, 04 March 2012 - 10:13 AM.

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#43 rahli

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 08:31 PM

Okay here are the pics.

These plants are seed grown common strain Psychotria viridis.
Attached File  Seed grown common strain Pschotria viridis.JPG   267.44KB   36 downloads
Here is a plant around 400mm
Attached File  Seed grown P. viridis.JPG   232.91KB   41 downloads
And here is a couple of smaller hard grown plants. It is the wet season now so they are looking pretty lush even though they are in full sun.
Attached File  Young hard seed grown P. viridis.JPG   270.03KB   25 downloads

They are all tending to look near identical to the common strain and I doubt there will be any difference once they mature.

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#44 planthelper

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 12:39 PM

Okay here are the pics.

They are all tending to look near identical to the common strain and I doubt there will be any difference once they mature.


yep, everybody say's the same, seed grown individuals of our "common" viridis produce themselfes true to type.

nice plants, if one gives them lots of sun, the leafes get more narrow and smaller, maybe the internodes lengh changes aswell, yours have large internodes.
but internodal lengh might get aswell influenced by day time night time teperature fluctiations, which seems to go hand in hand with, your full sun aspect. those plants would have very hot days and colder nights, than plants under shade cloth or the balcony or any other more shelterd aspect.
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#45 kazriel

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 11:19 PM

Planthelper
Of the 3 varieties initially listed la luna, shipibo, common - which have you found grows the best or have you found growth rates similar?
I am trying to decide myself between these and the nexus variety, do you have any person preference?

#46 planthelper

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 09:45 AM

the shipibo, moon and common, have similar growth rates, but are slower growers than the nexus.
but they have a better alkaloid profil, imo.

at your location, i would grow shipibo, moon or common, nexus is mostly grown in the colder parts of oz, for this plant is less sensitive to the cold.
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#47 lhb2444

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 01:18 PM

Hey hey,

A while ago I was given some psychotria carthagenesis plants which all looked very similiar (I posted some pictures of mine up here for ID'ing a while back)

Anyway I gave one of the seedlings to my brother who lives a few hours north and now are our plants are a lot bigger they are both looking significantly different. So I was hoping someone may be able to give me a bit of insight into what his may be.

The top 2 pictures are my brothers plant and the bottom 2 are mine. The guy I got them from propagated a heap for a tafe project and told me they were all psychotria carthagenesis.

Attached Files



#48 planthelper

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 04:02 PM

the first two pic's are unlikely to be cartha...robably 1 and 2 are a solani weed, which i just can't remeber it's name. very coomon, brainfreeze, sorry. 3 and 4 are p.cartha...

Edited by planthelper, 20 April 2012 - 04:04 PM.

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#49 whitewind

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 06:13 PM

Cestrum sp.

#50 lhb2444

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 04:41 PM

Thanks for the heads up guys, I'm sure my brother will be a bit disappointed but oh well! Quite a nice looking plant nevertheless





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