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Raising A.Phlebophylla


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#201 DeadStar

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Posted 23 November 2015 - 11:45 PM

you cannnot transplant acacia plants beyond a certain age.  it will mean certain death for your plant im afraid.

Not trying to be a dick or anything but this is not entirely true.

Ive never tried this with phleb but most acacia's can be transplanted or repotted year after year. You just need to get the timing right.

You have to wait until the the first flush of growth for the season has matured but before the buds burst for the second flush of growth.

Between these two flushes of growth most natives go into a semi dormant state. They do this to combat australias hot summers and drought conditions.


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#202 Sallubrious

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Posted 24 November 2015 - 07:59 AM

I think Ob was referring to mainly established trees in the ground.  In Zeds case, if it was planted in the ground for 4 or 5 years and then dug up I wouldn't like it's chances of survival.

 

If they are planted in a tree bag (sometimes they're sold as root control bags) to confine the roots and then planted in the soil you might get a bit better mileage if you want to dig it up & move it, if you do it when they are dormant as DS suggested and you take care to orient the tree the same way in its new position.

 

 Tree bags in the ground can be a problem though if you use a soil mix that has a different drainage profile to the surrounding soil. If the mix is better aerated and more free draining (like a typical potting mix) the bag can dry out when the water table drops and if it's the same soil as the site it can intermittently hold too much water because of drainage issues.


Edited by Sally, 24 November 2015 - 08:14 AM.

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#203 zed240

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 07:36 PM

So are phlebophylla self fertile? I've looked but not found the answer yet....

I think if they are I will put it in the ground here as it should have seeds before it possibly gets disturbed.

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#204 zed240

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Posted 22 December 2015 - 12:19 PM

So, my plant has started to look sad. Any help would be appreciated and since this thread is all about raising phlebophylla I thought this was a very suitable place to ask, as others could learn from my experience also.

 

It has appeared to be pretty happy at my place until the last week or so. Now it has phyllodes starting to brown and it has appear to get worse over the last few days with phyllodes getting browner further up the trunk.

 

I water it with rainwater almost every day, (every day when hot), and gave it a little sprinkle of osmocote native fertilizer shortly after getting it about 3-4 months ago.

 

We have just gone through 4 days of 40 degree weather and over that time even with water he has started to look a little sad. So any ideas as to whether you think this is "normal" heat stress or is there something else that I need to do for him? Does he need to be re-potted or something like that? It gets full sun between about 8am and 4pm at the moment, outside of those times it is shaded.

 

Attached File  Pleb 1.jpg   99.51KB   1 downloads    Attached File  Pleb 2.jpg   107.6KB   0 downloads

 

Any if anyone can shed some light on phleb's self sterility or fertility when it comes to setting seed I would appreciate it as I am no more educated on that as I was when I asked the question in the post above this one.

 

If I can't find any answers in the next few days this sucker is going to go in the ground and future consequences be damned.


Edited by zed240, 22 December 2015 - 12:20 PM.

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#205 theuserformallyknownasd00d

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Posted 22 December 2015 - 03:13 PM

New growth still looks good man so I wouldn't worry too much. Mine liked it better when I backed the sun off to only 8am-midday direct sun then ambient light.

But yeh it's lookin ok man! When I went to buff near all the plants were covered in dead Leaves like yours and I went at the peak of summer.
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#206 Heretic

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 09:48 AM

^ [ # 204 ]             Too much water ???


Edited by Heretic, 24 December 2015 - 09:55 AM.

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#207 zed240

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 10:11 AM

^ [ # 204 ]             Too much water ???

Is this something that is known to happen to phleb's when they're given too much water? And I wouldn't have thought water every day when it's 40 degrees would be too much....... But that's why I'm asking, I don't know shit!


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#208 LokStok

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 12:43 PM

i've lost a couple to overwatering in the past, primarily i think because they had recently been repotted up to bigger pots.

your symptoms don't look like that's the problem tho.

i'm with d00d with the partial afternoon shade thing for all my potted acacias.



#209 Sallubrious

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 01:41 PM

Have those phlebs been moved in the last few months ? If they've been in a position with lower light intensity, the old phyllodes will sometimes do that when the plant is moved to a position with more light. Newer phyllodes normally adapt without problems.

 

I'd knock the pot off them and check for any signs of something eating the roots. I get that sort of thing when ants move in to pots. Worms and nematodes can also cause a similar effect.

 

Although Acacias don't have true leaves what's going on is what as known as mature leaf necrosis.


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#210 obtuse

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Posted 25 December 2015 - 02:50 PM

My suspicion is that the tree is simply undergoing its normal summer stress period and as a result its senescing its lover phyllodes.  i visited my plants today and noticed the same pattern on my trees, and not on my shrubs.

 

this is a normal behavior in most plants as they mature.  with the focus being on growing tips than on older growth that is of not much use anymore, such that older growth is senesced but not before mobile nutrients are recycled, ie resulting in the yellowing phyllodes/leaves.  if the yellowing were happening on the new growth there would be much more reason for concern.

 

your trees may be stressed because they are in pots,  but i wonder if this is a good time to be planting in the ground as they will undergo far more stress through transplanting at this time of year.  personally i would wait till winter, but i wonder what other people would suggest.  pots tend to dry out quick, so a would thing your watering regime is probably ok.

 

my trees are growing flower buds for a full bloom in the coming months.  the flowers shown earlier not resulting in seeds.  sorry with christmas goings  didnt manage to capture photos this time around.

 

mine do get afternoon shade, but still have a some senescence.


Edited by obtuse, 25 December 2015 - 02:51 PM.

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