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Raising A.Phlebophylla


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#151 mystical oyster

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Posted 19 April 2015 - 03:31 PM

Planted out phleb along with confusa, flori, simplex, koa seeds a few days ago.
Phleb was the first to pop up!
Hopefully can keep it alive now.
Ended up giving my seeds away as i thought i wouldnt have the time or space to grow..
Now i do so hoping to find a few more..
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#152 IceCube

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Posted 19 April 2015 - 04:37 PM

Anyone have a source for a Bradyrhizobium innoculant? I have found Wattle Grow but it's $100 for enough to do 75kg of seed. Anyone want to go halves? I want to use to germinate courtii and phleb.


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#153 obtuse

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Posted 19 April 2015 - 06:34 PM

just go dig up soil from around other wattles to innoculate.

 

rhizobium is everywhere.  and probably better to use from soil as there would be a better compliment of associated bacteria and fungi.


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#154 Micromegas

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Posted 19 April 2015 - 10:39 PM

I've had planted for coming up to two months now, the phlebs have put on growth since being in the ground, not so much the accuminata. Am I the only one that finds accuminata to get to thrive ? What's the trick ?

 

 

Hey incog, this is a five year old acuminata. It's the biggest from one batch of seedlings planted in winter 2010. The rest are between 10-50% smaller depending on their location, they were a bit hit and miss in terms of speed but most of them are 8-10ft or more; the difference in their speed of growth was more in their spread and "fullness".

 

I have never watered or added anything to this plant, i.e. fertiliser or rhizobium. My annual rain fall is 350mm, soil is poor loam on clay with crumbly limestone about 80cm down. There's no trick, it could be the soil structure/type?

 

I do not think acuminata is a good hedging plant, IME it grows narrow and tall and does not fill in below say a metre which is what you want from hedge. It's not a great windbreak either unless it is staggered with other, bushier plants. It is a good host for Santalum species. The narrow-leaf variant would be a better hedge because it is bushier but is a far less attractive plant IMO and slower growing. Burkitii is bushy, but slow, but i don't think it likes clay it would prefer sand.

 

Floribunda on the other hand is very quick and bushy and would probably respond to pruning where acuminata would not. That would make a good acacia hedge. But it will die quickly too, 10-15 years i don't know. The advantage of acuminata is it lives a long time, and this is probably reflected by the fact that it can grow slow as well.

 

But my guess...

 

If you planted your plants in summer, they are growing slow because summer is not their growth period - especially for their roots. They should pick up in cooler weather with natural rainfall and get going in the following winter after you first planted them, i.e. their second growing season. Mine do not grow in summer, even if there are summer rains. They might have grown if I watered them but i doubt it, maybe just a little.

 

If they are not performing well in 18 months, only then would I be concerned and this would probably mean they do not like the soil type and you should chose a different species.

 

I like acuminata a lot, it is attractive and hardy, does not seem to compete strongly against things planted closely nearby and develops attractive furrowed bark within four or five years. Good luck!

 

I've never tried phleb. I did recently plant one and I look forward to seeing the results in six months' time when I see it next.

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Edited by Micromegas, 19 April 2015 - 10:40 PM.

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#155 IceCube

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Posted 19 April 2015 - 10:58 PM

just go dig up soil from around other wattles to innoculate.

 

rhizobium is everywhere.  and probably better to use from soil as there would be a better compliment of associated bacteria and fungi.

Has there been success with this? As I am doing tissue culture experiments, I would like to obtain a pure culture (but then I should just buy it lol). One experiment I was going to try was making a homogenate of some acacia nodules and culturing them/innoculating directly. 



#156 obtuse

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Posted 20 April 2015 - 02:12 AM

ah i see your point.

 

yes i have had success with my method.

 

but if you want a pure culture, the rhizobium within the nodule are maintained within a sterile environment, therefore would be easy enough to extract and then culture.

 

go find some longifolia dig up some seedlings and you should have plenty of nodules to work with.  my understanding is that rhizobia are only specific to genus not to species, but given how big the acacia genus is, findign a species closely related should mean that the rhizobium should be fine.


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#157 theuserformallyknownasd00d

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Posted 20 April 2015 - 06:34 AM

Flori's make a great hedge plant! These ones are 5mths in the round, went in as 3" single stem tubesAttached File  image.jpg   216.28KB   0 downloads
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#158 Tripyamine

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Posted 20 April 2015 - 08:21 AM

ah i see your point.

 

yes i have had success with my method.

 

but if you want a pure culture, the rhizobium within the nodule are maintained within a sterile environment, therefore would be easy enough to extract and then culture.

 

go find some longifolia dig up some seedlings and you should have plenty of nodules to work with.  my understanding is that rhizobia are only specific to genus not to species, but given how big the acacia genus is, findign a species closely related should mean that the rhizobium should be fine.

 

Good thinking! escaped me about the sterility 


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#159 incognito

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Posted 20 April 2015 - 07:00 PM

Yea well upon thinking upon my hedge I'll probably that the 9 or so accuminatas out and replace with phleb plants if the phlebs keep steaming along as they are. Winter will be their big test. The fresh gorgeous red growth on phlebs will look amazing on a hedge.
I can always remember my old rage teacher banging on about how acacias make awesome hedges. I'm basing this hedge entirely on his recommendation :) if it fails it fails of successful will be fricken awesome and a way to perhaps get these plants working in landscaping.

Those floribundas would hedge well :)

Edited by incognito, 20 April 2015 - 07:02 PM.

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#160 mutant

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Posted 22 April 2015 - 12:26 AM

epic thread should re-discover soon!


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