Jump to content
The Corroboree

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Yesterday
  2. Happy Bicycle Day all. One plant I was really impressed with over the heat was Hibiscus sabdariffa. I didn't know if it would do very well down here but it's pretty much everything I'm looking for in a plant over the warmer time of the year, it thrived in the crazy heat without being a pain to water. Easy to grow, super tough, high yielding as a medicinal and for food. First you get a barrage of beautiful aesthetic flowers then a continuous supply of calyx (albeit mine a little smaller than what I often see commercially) and leaf. The leaf is nice as a cooked/salad green (if you like lemon flavours) and if you want a hit of tasty sourish goodness, the calyx are nice even raw. Plants like this really do make your food your medicine. I have quite a bit of Roselle this year if anyone has interest in free seed soon (No WA/Tas), feel free to express interest. Actually after tips on the best way to collect the seeds, just let them ripen fully on the plant? if anyone has knowledge? I'm a bit conflicted, one source says "usually harvested ten days after the flower blooms. The large flowers fade and fall off, leaving behind their bright red, fleshy lotus shaped calyces. The Roselle flower seeds are then dried to be planted later and the fleshy red calyces are dried or eaten fresh." I've got lots of pods from when I was harvesting calyx - these viable or do the pods need more specific ripening time on the plant? Some permaculture people "definitely recommend planting Rosellas in the garden if you are in a warmer climate." [Good review on this plant] [2] Review on the pharmacology The plant showed antibacterial, anti-oxidant, nephro- and hepato-protective, renal/diuretic effect, effects on lipid metabolism (anti-cholesterol), anti-diabetic and anti-hypertensive effects among others. [3] Using the leaf as a cooked green: Hibiscus sabdariffa is "high in essential nutrients required for optimal performance of health and the maintenance of good health together with the reduction of aging". 10 polyphenols including chlorogenic acids, quercetin, kaempferol etc were identified in the leaves along with good levels of carotenoids showing good antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity Hibiscus derived polyphenols are known to ameliorate various inflammation-related conditions, including obesity. The mechanism includes the regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways, transcription factors, hormones and peptides, digestive enzymes, as well as epigenetic modifications [4] It can be considered as a food rich in lutein, chlorogenic acids and anthocyanins [5]. The organic acids such as hibiscus, dimethyl hibiscus, and hydroxycitric acid were strongly associated with some beneficial health effects [6]. A preliminary study on the use of this as an alternative source of iron for the treatment of anaemia and some other mineral deficiency diseases was promising Different works have demonstrated that Hibiscus sabdariffa extracts reduce blood pressure in humans - this effect is due to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor activity [7]. The polyphenol content in H. sabdariffa works as an anti-inflammatory by improving antioxidant conditions and regulating the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 [8]. Other Hibiscus anthocyanins have anti-depressant properties through dopaminergic, adrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms [9] . Possibly Effective for: Hibiscus flower normalises blood pressure and exerts a protective effect on the heart. New research is underscoring the possibility of using hibiscus to normalise blood sugar. Reports have shown that H. sabdariffa derived bioactive compounds are potent in the treatment of obesity with an evident reduction in body weight, inhibition of lipid accumulation and suppression of adipogenesis through the PPARγ pathway and other transcriptional factors [10] Low doses of Roselle tea or supplements appear to be effective in reducing blood pressure, and may be anti-diabetic. High blood pressure. Some early research shows that drinking hibiscus tea for 2-6 weeks decreases blood pressure in people with mildly high blood pressure. Other early research shows that taking a hibiscus extract by mouth for 4 weeks may be as effective as the prescription drug captopril for reducing blood pressure in people with mild to moderate high blood pressure. However, an analysis of results from various clinical studies suggests that there is not enough evidence to draw strong conclusions about the effects of hibiscus in reducing high blood pressure [11]. Also heaps of Ashwagandha seed still left.
  3. Hi mate, do you have photos? I'm in Perth. Thanks. Edited for replies
  4. Pedro99

    Wanted prints for microscopy

    I tried ordering some online but nothing came. If anyone wants cash (don't really have anything to trade) for some please let me know, I just got a new microscope.
  5. Hey I'm getting a bit overcrowded, have many varieties and clones, bulk PC. Hit me up if you're after anything. Have Knuth, patch, bridge, Peru, tersch, Cuzco scop x psycho0 psycho0 x yowie lance ss02 x juuls giant psycho0 greedo nice blue Peru forgotten name. not really interested in postage unless someone wants a big lot. the TPC X juuls monstrose cuttings I will post if good offer is made, beautiful plant that keeps surprising, has grown greatly and I have multiple cuts now. thanks
  6. anton_

    Post a random picture thread

    When the salvia hits
  7. Pedro99

    Psilocybin Mushrooms of SE QLD, Australia

    Think I'll actually go looking this time.. Looks like it might be raining till Wednesday.
  8. Responsible Choice

    Watch this space

    Alcohol is overwhelmingly the most common drug problem treated in Australia, but amphetamines are gaining ground as increasing numbers of users get specialist support, according to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) report released on Wednesday. https://www.smh.com.au/healthcare/the-number-one-drug-addiction-driving-australians-into-treatment-20190416-p51er1.html Time for a walk down memory lane then, back when drugs didn't kill you. Wish there was a drug like that still around...
  9. Hi Kindness, Having had decades of experience with opiates, including these substitution programs...and being a fan of Kratom, I would say Kratom is going to have a hard time staving off the full withdrawal effect fo methadone at 40mg (depends how long you've been on too..if only a few months you'll have it easy). Kratom will only fill the Mu Opiate receptor (same one that Suboxone works on) but leave the primary Delta opiate receptor still empty and thirsty. I think if you moved to Suboxone (but keep tapering down after stabilising) and then to Kratom the transition would be easier. You'll want Red strains and probably need to dose every hour or two. happy to chat further if that helps,' cheers, Flux
  10. Glaukus

    Watch this space

    Is it mere coincidence that 420 follows on from bicycle day? I think not.
  11. Caster

    Watch this space

    https://harmreductionjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12954-019-0278-6
  12. levicacti

    Bridgesii, qld winters and repotting

    Yeah it's def the best way to go if possible, you can probably get similar growth from pots but they require a lot more work while as long as the soils ok you can just put it in the ground and forget about it and it'll do great. This is Melbourne though so might be dryer in the warm weather but is pretty wet during winter and I've still had no problems in the ground.
  13. Responsible Choice

    Psilocybin Mushrooms of SE QLD, Australia

    Definitely! Especially with the soil temps holding and big rain coming.
  14. Pedro99

    Bridgesii, qld winters and repotting

    Oh cool thanks for the info Levi. Did you notice a big increase in growth when they were in the ground?
  15. Pistol

    Psilocybin Mushrooms of SE QLD, Australia

    Is it still Still worth a forage?
  16. levicacti

    Bridgesii, qld winters and repotting

    Also my 2c concerning renting is don't be afraid to plant them in the ground if there's somewhere suitable as they're usually pretty easy to uproot from the ground especially if in the open and only for a few years, maybe clay soil would be harder though. I had a massive single branched scop in the ground years ago which seemed so solid to wind etc. but a little push and it came right out , a big multi-branched one you'll probably have to take cuttings from when moving but dig out the stump and it'll produce an awesome plant too. I had a small backyard pretty full years ago and I think the owner thought they were permanent and liked them but I didn't have to leave a single piece, leaves it looking pretty empty though and requires a bit of clean up
  17. Last week
  18. Hey everyone, Finally got a greenhouse and want to have a crack at growing the plants listed in the title. Are there any NZ members interested in swaps? Please leave a message :)
  19. ☽Ţ ҉ĥϋηϠ₡яღ☯ॐ€ðяئॐ♡Pϟiℓℴϟℴ

    Post your track of the day

  20. Darklight

    Edible Cultures for Sale Australia

    What? PM me, you're a deadset legend
  21. Darklight

    Plant Swap Melbourne EGA

    But bring what ya got. It doesn't need to be the flashest thing ever. You got stuff to share, bring it! Plenty of gardens ( including mine ) lost heapsa species during the dry. Geez, I even lost the bloody choko vine, my Hemia, basil, cornflower. Veggie patch is full of weird holes from missing species that carked it over summer Lots of people starting their collections too, more'n a few here have lost species moving house/ relocating If you've got cuttings, seedlings, seeds or interesting garden related things like the screened topsoil- just bring it! Is always a surprise what people want at plant swaps, which is half the fun
  22. Darklight

    Plant Swap Melbourne EGA

    Orright, bringing some Pleurotus djamor ( Pink Oyster mushroom ) cultures isolated from wild NNSW fruit, they're pretty hardy for much of the year here And some local NNSW Hericium coralloides ( Coral Mushroom ) cultures And a few Pycnoporus sp.cultures I isolated from fruit across the road. I dunno why. No idea how to use them medicinally yet. I think I just like their potential, even in bush regeneration They'll all be in 1.5ml single use tubes, store in the fridge well for quite some time
  23. That's a gift in extremely good taste. Double bonus points, a great gift she'll remember for years AND you get to hang out with plant heads OMG it's less than a month away, so excited OMG OMG I need to wash my hair, subculture the fungus, get the brakes done on the bike, finish the a/v slides for the workshop, it's panic stations for me from here on in Ronny how the hell does the EGA crew manage to fit all this excellence into a single day? Most days I can't even manage an autoclave run and a full subculture session with updated logging My main plan, work aside, is to catch up with as many ppl as possible. EGA is about the only place where I see so many of my favourite people so very close together in time and space
  24. obtuse

    Edible Cultures for Sale Australia

    I am also on the hunt for some cultures. looking to buy though as i have nothing to trade
  25. Any mob here going to Rabbits this year? It'd be sweet to catch up your a yarn...
  26. lindsay

    Edible Cultures for Sale Australia

    Nice collection ace1928. Can i entice you out of hibernation. i have selected a good number from your list. it should make it worthwhile I have spare slants to trade of Black Poplar (Agrocybe Aegerita) Morel (Morchella Angusticeps) lions Mane (Hericium Coralloides) i have a good number of others, but need to test grow these isolates before i can offer out. Here is my wish list. i am after fresh plates, that have not grown to the outer edge. a centimetre of growth is fine. happy to pay fast post. *Pearl Oyster *Monster - Victorian Origin Wild Pearl Oyster *Victorian Blue Oyster *Sordid Blewit - Lepista sordida *Maitake *Black Morel (morchella importuna) *Hon-Shimeji/Beech *Paddy Straw *Pink Oyster *Golden Oyster *White Ferula (pleurotus nebrodensis) *Milky Mushroom (calocybe indica)
  1. Load more activity
×