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Ed Dunkel

"Longifolia group" and DMT

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I'm starting a topic collecting info on tryptamines in the "longifolia family" in Acacia, in the bushfood forum.

feel free to add info below or there. bushfood

Here was the list of acacias in the "longifolia group", of Acacia subgenus Phyllodineae:

The usual suspects A. phlebophylla, maidenii, obtusifolia and sophorae.

But the rest:

A.

alpina

courtii

dallachiana

floribunda

longissima

mucronata

orites

and the closely related:

A.

axillaris

genistifolia

(h)omalophylla

oxycedrus

rhigiophylla

riceana

ventricillata

Edited by Ed Dunkel

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oh ed i have just a really inportant questions if i may 1, does this mean dmt can be proccessed from all of these species this is good stuff because it might keep the presher of the more popular acacias

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oh ed i have just a really inportant questions if i may 1, does this mean dmt can be proccessed from all of these species this is good stuff because it might keep the presher of the more popular acacias

Sorry for the delayed reply, was gone last week in NSW (graduation/holiday)

DMT is probably not present in all of this "group" but not all have been fully investigated and characterised. Most do seem to contain simple tryptamines so it could be exviting to see if the less explored ones do.

Sort of why I placed this 'heads up' in the forum, to see if any more work has been done on it. It also seems like an area where not that much research has been done.

If a easily propagated Acacia species could be found (species, chemotype or even a hybrid) with a clean source of DMT, it would certainly keep the pressure off of the more vunerable one(s).

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sounds great if a clean dmt acacia can be grown , there are numerous a,longfolia along the coust highway over my way so it would be of much interest to find out want the deal with longfolia its classafied as a big weed in this shire and the shire are going around riping them out ,we have a few monster specamans (longfolias) almost 20 30 foot big girls and probely about a 20 hecters stand of the mothers! mulga sais it contains the goods but there seems to great mystery , whats going on is the acaia just starting to produce dmt ,kind of like the plants are trying to comunacate with us ,its funny how dmt discovery is coenciding with globel warming , any way whats going on here why are some acacia produce and some not , geografic area or soil to blame , this grey area is shorly of upmost cutting edge of AUSTRALIAN NATIVES AND IN URGENT NEED OF RESEACH , any way i want to test my longfolia stand havent got a clue ,should try and learn will one day but for now can send some sampels from the stand (from many different indavigel plant and land forms troughout the stand)and send it away to one of you guys in the comunity , what do ya say O ROO

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i want to test my longfolia stand havent got a clue

Someone used to sell tryptamine test kits based on simple TLC plate runs and indicator solutions. Who was that again?

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Someone used to sell tryptamine test kits based on simple TLC plate runs and indicator solutions. Who was that again?

I think it was fractal

Someone I met told me about some trial extractions he did on longifolia. He said that he did one, before he really knew what he was doing. His technique was very messy and his equipment primitive but he did produce a very small amount of yellow, indole-scented oil. Months later when he had refined his technique and upgraded his equipment he did another two extractions from the same tree, one of bark and one of phyllodes. Both produced nothing.

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I found 0.2% in a good strain of Longifolia bark once... it was mild... I don't feel this tree really has much chutzpah and really mature specimens can be hard to find...

Sophorae has never come up positive after about half a dozen tests at different times of the year...

I've tested most of these species a few times...

alpina - negative, but have heard reports.

courtii - quite rare, never searched it out! t

dallachiana - negative

floribunda - negative

longissima - unsure

mucronata - negative!

orites - very negative

and the closely related:

A.

axillaris

genistifolia

(h)omalophylla

oxycedrus

rhigiophylla

riceana

ventricillata

Don't know about any of these or have heard anything about them...

A. Crassa, A. concurrens, A. leiocalyx and A. longispicata are all in the Julliflorae section with anastomising veins also... I haven't searched them out either... as they only have a very limited distribution and are notoriously difficult to ID... and I have never felt called to any of them. Concurrens seems to me to be the most likely prospect!

There are a few species on the east coast which contain a goodly amount of tryptamines which various people know about, and they have their own reasons for not sharing this information it seems!

Julian.

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Cheers Julian,

Good to get some feedback from you. Nice to get some more species on the list as well.

Maybe someday there will be a good systematic investigation and collation of these acacias and what they contain. Seasonal changes, possibly daily changes, "terroir" or climatic/locational effects. Like cultivating a great grape for the wine.

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shit, wat a scoop of proportions, beware the bodo monkey with gout.

Edited by darcy

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mature specimens can be hard to find..

i have mature longfolias 30 to 40 feet with trunks the size of a basketball every where

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I was wandering if anyone could recommend a good book that has clear pictures and descriptions of these Acacias. I would love to be able to take some pics of them as I have others when I enter the regions they grown in.

:)

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Ronny a good one is

Native Trees and Shrubs of SE Australia - Leon Costermans...the big yellow one not the pocket books,

but it's Black/white drawing and descriptions...it's more of a key for ID

But you'll probably need a bit of botanical knowledge/terminology.

I'm not aware of many books that have good colour photos and descriptions dealing with Acacia...i've seen a few pocket books but it's all very general stuff, alot rehashed from other authors.

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oh ronny, you came and you found me a turkey....

cool, thats the one...Acacias are only a small part BTW...it's also alot about Eucalypts and other dominant shrub/tree...Casuarina/Callistemon/Correa/Banksia/hakea etc...

It kind of goes through different areas of VIC and the associated shrub and trees there

But it's excellent for getting to know other interesting species in Vic that's for sure.

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But it's excellent for getting to know other interesting species in Vic that's for sure.

Cool that sounds like just what i wont :lol:

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But it's excellent for getting to know other interesting species in Vic that's for sure.

Cool that sounds like just what i wont :lol:

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Thanks for the links guys, they rock

I am not sure when I am going to get to take the pics, but I sure hope to when I get a chance.

Anyone have other suggestions for target species around Vic for me to try and photograph (I would just ring Michel B and ask him but he is off in Europe);

So far I have snap pics of

Acacia Obtusifolia

Acacia Phlebophylla

Which off the following list are prevalent in Vic that i have not marked?

Acacia Albida

Acacia Baileyana - (Vic)

Acacia Beauverdiana

Acacia Complanata

Acacia Cultiformis

Acacia Cuthbertsonii

Acacia Delibrata

Acacia Falcata

Acacia Laeta

Acacia Longifolia - (Vic)

Acacia Maidenii

Acacia Mellifera

Acacia Nilotica

Acacia Obtusifolia - (Vic)

Acacia Penninervis

Acacia Phlebophylla - (Vic)

Acacia Podalyriaefolia

Acacia Retinodes - (Vic)

Acacia Saliicnia

Acacia Senegal

Acacia Seyal

Acacia Sieberana

Acacia Simplicifolia

Acacia Vestita

Is anyone still working on that plant calendar Idea that was coolest?

:)

Edited by RonnySimulacrum

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I found 0.2% in a good strain of Longifolia bark once... it was mild... I don't feel this tree really has much chutzpah and really mature specimens can be hard to find...

There is an invasion of mid sized specimens around Angelsea hinterland and heathland. Harvesting the bark off these trees and ringbarking in the process would be doing your bit for the local ecology. So get on down there.......

I have had some extract from this population and it was very good ,although i have no idea how much bark was used and the amount of the finished product.

The soil is very sandy , hard as a rock and bone dry all year. Maybe growing conditions determine active alkaloid content so dont give up yet. I must say though you have worked very hard so far. Well done,i wish i knew what i was doing. Theres so many plants i'd love to examine for active alkaloids, I smell it occassionally and there's no Acacia sp around. :)

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Which off the following list are prevalent in Vic that i have not marked?

Acacia Retinodes - (Vic)

Acacia retinodes is only found in Wilsons Prom and Geelong i think. Its locally common in the Prom but in Geelong it is a stand of around 50 trees. Cool considering that the two populations are hundreds of kilometres apart. Although i remember vaguely that the A.retinodes was var 'uncinata' or something like that so i am probably totally wrong. I just felt like writing something,forgive me. :)

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Which off the following list are prevalent in Vic that i have not marked?

Acacia Albida

Acacia Baileyana - (Vic)

Acacia Beauverdiana

Acacia Complanata

Acacia Cultiformis

Acacia Cuthbertsonii

Acacia Delibrata

Acacia Falcata

Acacia Laeta

Acacia Longifolia - (Vic)

Acacia Maidenii

Acacia Mellifera

Acacia Nilotica

Acacia Obtusifolia - (Vic)

Acacia Penninervis

Acacia Phlebophylla - (Vic)

Acacia Podalyriaefolia

Acacia Retinodes - (Vic)

Acacia Saliicnia

Acacia Senegal

Acacia Seyal

Acacia Sieberana

Acacia Simplicifolia

Acacia Vestita

Is anyone still working on that plant calendar Idea that was coolest?

:)

im pretty sure the only other three that are prevelalent in vic are, A. penninervis, A. podalyriifolia and A. salicina.

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im pretty sure the only other three that are prevelalent in vic are, A. penninervis, A. podalyriifolia and A. salicina.

Actually Passive, i think the question should be re worded. None of these species are really prevalent. They may be locally common though. Prevalent seems to sugest widespread and common.

Acacias are weeds, they are common wherever they exist. In answer to the real question though i think there should be some sort of DPI database with this information and it would most likely have specific locations of occurance. I will suss out the sitchjava script:emoticon(':)', 'smid_2')

:)

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im pretty sure the only other three that are prevelalent in vic are, A. penninervis, A. podalyriifolia and A. salicina.

Sorry Jactus, i will re-word it for you.

Im pretty sure the only thre other acaias from your list that could be found in Vic are A. penninervis, A. podalyriifolia and A. salicina.

That better chief?

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Sorry Jactus, i will re-word it for you.

Im pretty sure the only thre other acaias from your list that could be found in Vic are A. penninervis, A. podalyriifolia and A. salicina.

That better chief?

Thanks Passive, but i wasn't having a poke at you. I just didn't feel the use of that word was applicable. :)

I know that a form of A.retinodes exists around here though. i don't know much outside my local area. Now i'm on a mission to find out how many of these wattles do occur in Vic. Sorry, i'm bored. very bored.

Then i might search thru some more posts to find something else i have no idea about to pick at.

:wacko: i'm pathetic :)

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