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Ypsilophora

Acacia seeds!

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Hi!

Just wondering what acacia seeds people have that they think I'd be interested in (basically any and all :P)... As I'm quite new to this whole ethnobotany thingo I don't have much to offer in return... but could probably dig up some native grass seeds or similar, may not be of interest to people, but then again, maybe it will... beyond this there is always cash :lol:

 

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Ah, oops... should probably specify that the more frost hardy the better! :rolleyes:

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Hey YP, A.floribunda is a frost hardy fellow.

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Got a bunch of Acuminata seeds if you're after some - easy to grown and a reliable plant....but also a Western Australian desert tree, so probably not too frost hardy

 

A. Obtusifolia is probably the most frost hardy acacia as it grows in the mountains of NSW where it often snows over winter frost ... 

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Hey Flux, 

ended up putting an order online for a bunch of different seeds... I now have more acacia seeds than I'll ever know what to do with!

It'll be interesting to see how the acuminatas go, we get hit pretty hard by the frosts here, maybe if I get them through their first few winters they might be okay.

 

Yeah, would love to get some obtusi's going, plenty around in the bush... but never found one large enough for seed... just hundreds of little sucker type things, it's pretty odd, dunno if it's normal or not though (the lack of mature age individuals).

 

Thanks so much for the offer though!

Yp

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19 hours ago, Ypsilophora said:

Yeah, would love to get some obtusi's going, plenty around in the bush... but never found one large enough for seed... just hundreds of little sucker type things, it's pretty odd, dunno if it's normal or not though (the lack of mature age individuals).

They're mostly fire ephemerals. An abundance of young fire sensitive species generally means the area was burnt one, two or three seasons ago. Growth rates depend on a lot of factors including temps, altitude, soil nutrition, wind sun and snow exposure, rainfall etc. but they're generally very fast growing so you may see seed in summer.

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Hmmm, that's interesting, haven't had a fire through those particular areas in the twelve years I've been here, and the areas that had seen fire seem completely devoid of them (possibly the fire frequency was too great, and so the younger recruits burnt before they could set seed?... dunno). 

 

Actually, just remembered I have found one that was seeding, right next to the road, couple of years ago now... I was very excited until I drove past one morning and found it had been mulched along with everything else on the side of the road... I was devastated, to say the least!

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Fire frequencies could be responsible for the lack of it in spots that were recently burnt. Could be something else also. Always difficult to say.

 

Acacia spp. Do regularly germinate by roads without fire. The physical abrasion of seed, the high amounts of light due to the cleared trees and the regular pooling and drying of water roadside contribute to faster seed coat decay allowing for germination. I'd still suggest an abundance of similarly aged Acacia spp. is likely the result of fire though. Perhaps they're particularly slow growing at that locality.

 

Did you end up getting any Acacia obtusifolia seed? Are you still looking?

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5 hours ago, Freakosystem said:

Fire frequencies could be responsible for the lack of it in spots that were recently burnt. Could be something else also. Always difficult to say.

 

Acacia spp. Do regularly germinate by roads without fire. The physical abrasion of seed, the high amounts of light due to the cleared trees and the regular pooling and drying of water roadside contribute to faster seed coat decay allowing for germination. I'd still suggest an abundance of similarly aged Acacia spp. is likely the result of fire though. Perhaps they're particularly slow growing at that locality.

 

Did you end up getting any Acacia obtusifolia seed? Are you still looking?

Thanks for the info!

 

I guess fire would probably be it... just very slow-growing in that particular area.

Haven't been able to get any A. obtusifolia seed yet, definitely still looking!

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On 24/04/2020 at 9:09 PM, Flux said:

Got a bunch of Acuminata seeds if you're after some - easy to grown and a reliable plant....but also a Western Australian desert tree, so probably not too frost hardy

 

Acacia acuminata are extremely frost hardy, for weeks at a time

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On 27/04/2020 at 11:59 PM, Ypsilophora said:

Haven't been able to get any A. obtusifolia seed yet, definitely still looking!

Flick me a pm with your address and I'll send some out.

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