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Pedro99

Bridgesii, qld winters and repotting

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Hi guys, 

I'm pretty new here, love the positive vibes! Just got a couple of questions I haven't been able to find the answer for yet so hope someone can shed some light.

 

I've got a couple of bridgesii that I chopped around 4 months ago (could be a bit longer), and I'm wanting to re-pot them as I feel a bit mean leaving them in such little ones. I've read that they shouldn't be repotted or fertilised during winter though I'm in qld on the sunshine coast where the winters aren't at all harsh. Will these cacti still go dormant here? Could be a silly question but these are the first I've had and I don't want to kill them or anything.

 

Also I'll attach some photos, any suggestions are appreciated. What size pot should I go to next? 

 

Thanks! 

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I think you'll be ok to repot up there. I doubt you'd get any real dormancy on the sunny coast. I'm in Sydney and there are years here when there's no dormancy, at least for some plants. 

Just keep an eye on them, if they look like they stopped growing, then you can hold back water.

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I know some folks say not to upsize pots too drastically, but in my experience they'll usually fill any size pot you give them pretty quickly. It'll save you having to upsize again within a year or so.

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Yeah my bridgies only slow down really. But I am a cactus babysitter, not a fully-fledged cacti connoisseur :blush:

 

36 minutes ago, Glaukus said:

 

Just keep an eye on them, if they look like they stopped growing, then you can hold back water.

 

^and this.

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Mate there are a few places on the sunny coast which can get a bit of a frost, some times, every where else shouldn't be much of a problem. Wider the pot the better, or get em in the ground. :lol:

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Posted (edited)

Thanks a lot for the replies everyone, I'm gonna go get some wide pots, soil, sand etc tomorrow and hopefully these guys will start to fatten up! :lol:

 

Oh and crop, I'd love to get them in the ground but I'm renting and would hate to leave them behind.

Edited by Pedro99
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Dormancy is something that you get below 10° Celsius. Everything above isn´t really something I´d be worried about. The colder it gets, the slower these plants grow, but if your climate supports it you can still repot or root cuttings. Personally, I only use sand for rooting because it dries very fast and doesn´t cause problems with humidity below the cuts. If you have a rather organic soil, it will always trap humidity at the surface where your cut touches the soil. But yeah, other than this I wouldn´t worry a lot. Just make sure they stay dry and don´t get wet feet when it´s really cold. 

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Also my 2c concerning renting is don't be afraid to plant them in the ground if there's somewhere suitable as they're usually pretty easy to uproot from the ground especially if in the open and only for a few years, maybe clay soil would be harder though. 

I had a massive single branched scop in the ground years ago which seemed so solid to wind etc. but a little push and it came right out B), a big multi-branched one you'll probably have to take cuttings from when moving but dig out the stump and it'll produce an awesome plant too.

I had a small backyard pretty full years ago and I think the owner thought they were permanent and liked them but I didn't have to leave a single piece, leaves it looking pretty empty though and requires a bit of clean up:blush:

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Oh cool thanks for the info Levi. Did you notice a big increase in growth when they were in the ground? 

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Yeah it's def the best way to go if possible, you can probably get similar growth from pots but they require a lot more work while as long as the soils ok you can just put it in the ground and forget about it and it'll do great.

This is Melbourne though so might be dryer in the warm weather but is pretty wet during winter and I've still had no problems in the ground.

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