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Spiky Mc Cactus Face

Advice, b cappi, hot dry summers/cold winters, growing in pots

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Hi every one

 

Hopefully some b cappie will fall across my path soon, possibly some is already on its way

 

Anyways when the times comes iv got some unfavorable conditions 

 

I get long hot summers (bullshit hot at times hit 53 degrees C a couple of summers ago) and the sun can strip the skin of a rhinos arse in my location at mid day. Then i get cold dry winters some times as low -5 or lower. Growing in the ground is not an option due to moisture seeking militaristic termites and other nasty little ground dwelling beasties with big teeth and my soil type isn't compatible for rainforest vines 

 

So i just wanna run my thoughts past some more experienced green thumbs just to be sure im on the right track.

 

To beat the climate im thinking indoors, somewhere it can get a bit light under a window or something, which means a pot. Automaticly a plus to beat the beasties....thinking im gonna need a big one, guess 80L+. After watching a couple of doccos i seen they like to grow near creeks and rivers so i persume the water table wouldn't be far down. So to replicate this im guessing a deepish (10-15cm) saucer/tray to sit the pot in to fill with water....thinking im gonna need a moisture wicking but well drain airy median rich in organic matter, maybe a coco coir mixed with compost, pumice, vermiculite ect to keep the weight down

 

Maybe a section of mesh i can train it 

 

I did try searching the forum for info but b cappi is mentioned everywhere lol.

 

Thanks in advance for any advice, info, ideas or critique 

 

 

 

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its always worth a try, at the very least it'll be a good experiment... I find caapi (its caapi, that might help your searches...) pretty easy to keep going. It does love root space, and you would probably have to keep it as a semi bonzai and be forever trimming it back so you can get fat vine but still move it... Do-able, but yeah I think you'd be wanting to try and tame it to grow it there... If you're on bore water you may need to treat it...

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28 minutes ago, MountainGoat said:

its always worth a try, at the very least it'll be a good experiment... I find caapi (its caapi, that might help your searches...) pretty easy to keep going. It does love root space, and you would probably have to keep it as a semi bonzai and be forever trimming it back so you can get fat vine but still move it... Do-able, but yeah I think you'd be wanting to try and tame it to grow it there... If you're on bore water you may need to treat it...

 

Thanks man much appreciated :)

 

Ill ahh give that new spelling ago :)lol...admittedly i gotta pick up my spelling and grammar game. I blame the auto correct/predictive text function on phones. Its made me sloppy :blush:

 

Think i got the perfect spot for it in my humble tin shack lol, morning sun a decent space to spred a couple meters either side. Figured i could stretch out a peice of mesh to train it back an forth then cut it back when its to big and let it grow back again...options for water is dam water when they fill again(if it ever decides to rain again, seriously those in flood affected QLD could line up with buckets and start shifting it into inland NSW would be great) or rain water, but currently been having to cart water from town...

 

Size limitation cause of pot size is good in this case 

 

It worth a try i guess if it fails then hopefully i better success with growing yopo

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Won't need the massive pot right off the bat, you can probably pot it up each year or so. Might be an idea to go with the dwarf variety so that you can get nice, thick but compact growth. It goes pretty well in a pot and will be more manageable to move around, because you are on the money that it will need shelter over winter. Don't know about the 50+ days, but it could probably get accustomed to it. 

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1 hour ago, nothinghead said:

Won't need the massive pot right off the bat, you can probably pot it up each year or so. Might be an idea to go with the dwarf variety so that you can get nice, thick but compact growth. It goes pretty well in a pot and will be more manageable to move around, because you are on the money that it will need shelter over winter. Don't know about the 50+ days, but it could probably get accustomed to it. 

 

Cheers man. Ill keep an eye out for dwarf varietys. Im hoping it the hot summers wont bother em to much

 

Big ups

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dwarf varieties? that sound interesting, which varieties of aya are dwarf varities. I wouldn't have thought it would dwarf considering its a vine... They do display different growth habits depending on their position. Full sun you get a sprawling shrubby kind of thing, but if its got something to climb, it'll take over a tree pretty quick...

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This caapi started as a small (maybe 15cm) cutting in October and is going gangbusters under Melbourne conditions (hot and mostly dry) in a pot. Gets fairly direct sun in the morning and is really thirsty. It's not seen it's first winter though - my current plan is to move it to a nice sheltered spot on the well-protected deck, or even into the garage.

 

It grows real quick, so I've been trying to train it back into the lattice installed into the back of the pot, and I also simply plan to prune a lot if things get out of hand - should result in thicker growth anyway.

 

 

IMG_2782.JPG

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BTW, the pot you see here is a kinda indoor pot I think - no drainage holes at very bottom - and it also has a bit of a reservoir at the bottom to hold a bit of excess water for self-watering (water will escape if you tip the pot or really over-fill it). Seems to be working well. I think this is it: https://www.bunnings.com.au/home-leisure-39cm-sq-traditional-watersaver-pot-charcoal_p2941487

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15 minutes ago, jojomcgogo said:

This caapi started as a small (maybe 15cm) cutting in October and is going gangbusters under Melbourne conditions (hot and mostly dry) in a pot. Gets fairly direct sun in the morning and is really thirsty. It's not seen it's first winter though - my current plan is to move it to a nice sheltered spot on the well-protected deck, or even into the garage.

 

It grows real quick, so I've been trying to train it back into the lattice installed into the back of the pot, and I also simply plan to prune a lot if things get out of hand - should result in thicker growth anyway.

 

 

IMG_2782.JPG

 

Thank you thats exactly what i wanted to see :)....feeling good on my thoughts now 

 

By the way thants some nice green thumbing you got going there, hope it all works out and survives for next year. Definitely keep up the impressive work.

 

Between i what iv just seen and the suggestion of possible dwarf varietys im gonna end up with a kick arse indoor shed plant :lol:

 

 

 

 

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On 08/02/2019 at 11:03 AM, MountainGoat said:

dwarf varieties? that sound interesting, which varieties of aya are dwarf varities. I wouldn't have thought it would dwarf considering its a vine... They do display different growth habits depending on their position. Full sun you get a sprawling shrubby kind of thing, but if its got something to climb, it'll take over a tree pretty quick...

 

Apparently selecting with Tucunaca can result in dwarf plants. My random Tucunaca has small leaves and short internodes. Grows much more compact than the cielo it is next to. 

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