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Inyan

Hemerocallis

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https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Hemerocallis+yezoensis

"

hazardsmall.png Large quantities of the leaves are said to be hallucinogenic. Blanching the leaves removes this hallucinatory component[205]. (This report does not make clear what it means by blanching, it could be excluding light from the growing shoots or immersing in boiling water[K].)"

 

Anyone know anything about this plant? Is it safe?

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I've eaten flowers in a salad before. I had no idea they were psychoactive though and didn't experience anything.

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Yes, apparently the flowers are edible. The foliage is what is supposed to be hallucinogenic and even then from the little  bit I can find on it... it appears that large quantities need to be eaten to garner any affect. If cooked, the foliage becomes edible and the hallucinogenic property is destroyed. I'm thinking juicing might be the best way to gather this substance, but it would be nice to know at what temperature the hallucinogenic molecule is deactivated. Thinking along the lines of drying out the material at highest safe temps to enable a smaller quantity to be worked with. As it is far smarter to err on the side of caution and make many experiments than to overshoot and find out the quantity one has chosen is much more than is safe to work with.

 

"As for edibility….. Young spring shoots and leaves under five inches taste similar to mild onions when fried in butter. They are also a mild pain killer and in large quantities are hallucinogenic.  The leaves quickly become fibrous so they can only be eaten young (but you can make cordage out of the older leaves.)  The flower buds, a rich source of iron, are distinguished from the plant’s non-edible fruits by their internal layering. The blossoms are edible as well, raw or cooked (as are seeds if you find any.) The dried flower contains about 9.3% protein, 25% fat, 60% carbohydrate, 0.9% ash. It is rich in vitamin A.  The closed flower buds and edible pods are good raw in salads or boiled, stir-fried or steamed with other vegetables. The blossoms add sweetness to soups and vegetable dishes and can be stuffed like squash blossoms. Half and fully opened blossoms can be dipped in a light batter and fried tempura style (which by the way was a Portuguese way of cooking introduced to Japan.) Dried daylily petals are an ingredient in many Chinese and Japanese recipes "http://www.eattheweeds.com/daylily-just-cloning-around-2/

 

 

Edited by Inyan

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"'Although all parts of the plant are edible, some reports warn that consumption of large quantities of young shoots can be hallucinogenic and should be avoided." http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weedguide/single_weed.php?id=37

 

"Although all parts of the plant are edible, some reports warn that consumption of large quantities of young shoots can be hallucinogenic and should be avoided"https://brigittemars.com/other/day-lilies/

 

Not condoning any lighthearted research with this one, but it does make one want to see what other information is available on the medicinal as well as psychotropic properties of Hemerocallis.

 

 

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Interesting plant, irie that somebody is exploring it.

I have Hemerocallis citrina on the balcony year-round, it tolerates over -15°C in winter and has lovely smelling flowers the whole summer.

To my experience the scent of the flowers could be described as (descending dominance):

floral (like lilies but softer) - sweet - fresh-citrus (lime) - butter-creamy - fruity (banana) - oceanic

I also associate the scent with bathing.

 

The leaves taste slightly like garlic and, like old chinese herbal books state, can make you "see ghosts" if eaten fresh and in large quantities.

The term "hallucinogenic" may be a translation error.

I only ate them in smaller quantities and could only notice a slightly sedating effect.

 

A japanese study from 2012 found a sedative substance in Hemerocallis fulva: Oxypinnatanine (a kind of amino acid).

quote:

By the electroencephalographic measurement after intraperitoneally administration and oral administration of oxypinnatanine in mice, the increase in amount of sleep was observed...

 

Also another study found that oxypinnatanine (30 mg/kg) increased the total time of NREM sleep by 84%.

 

More interresting compounds in Hemerocallis fulva:

icariside D2 (anticarcinogenic),

sallidroside (also in Rhodiola rosea, along with

rosavin, as one of the potential compounds responsible for the putative antidepressant and anxiolytic actions.

 

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Oxypinnatanine was (as yet) only found in Hemerocallis fulva, which grows wild, here in Vienna on danube island (a long island in the river danube).

But maybe nobody searched for it in Hemerocallis citrina.

 

An interesting study of Hemerocallis citrina from 2012:

Ethanol extracts from Hemerocallis citrina attenuate the decreases of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, TrkB levels in rat induced by corticosterone administration

Li-Tao Yi , Huo-Chen Li , Jing Li , Ying Zhou

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Hemerocallis citrina, a traditional herbal medicine, has been used for the improvement of behavioral and emotional status in Eastern-Asia countries. AIM OF THE STUDY: Our previous studies have demonstrated that the ethanol extracts of H. citrina flowers (HCE) reversed the behavioral alterations and monoamine neurotransmitter dysfunctions in stressed mice. However, the relation of its antidepressant-like action with neurotrophic molecular expressions remains unknown. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To clarify this, we explored the effect of HCE (32.5, 65, 130mg/kg, p.o.) on the behavior, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor (TrkB) in depression-like rats induced by exogenous administration of the stress hormone corticosterone (40mg/kg, s.c.). RESULTS: It was observed that repeated administration of corticosterone induced an elevation on the serum corticosterone levels, which caused the abnormalities observed in the sucrose preference test and forced swimming test (FST). Administration of HCE (65 and 130mg/kg) reversed the changes above and up-regulated the BDNF and TrkB receptor protein expressions in the brain region of frontal cortex and hippocampus. CONCLUSION: These findings confirm that HCE produce an antidepressant-like effect in corticosterone-induced depression-like model of rats and this effect is at least partly mediated by BDNF-TrkB signaling in the frontal cortex and hippocampus.

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I pickle the flowers every year, they taste delicious in vinegar, you could also use the vinegar itself in which you pickled it.

Also I extracted the scent from the flowers with:liquid paraffin for 1 day (enfleurage), then extracted the liquid paraffin with 80% alcohol for 2 weeks (shaking well) and concentrated it to the absolute.

 

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The study I posted found an upregulation of BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor) and TrkB (tropomyosin receptor kinase B), which means it is neurotrophic, which means it supports the survival and growth of nerve cells!

 

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Haven't seen you around for a while Mindperformer, nice that you are posting again! :)

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