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zelly

yopo seed pods

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My yopo tree started producing pods several years ago, first just a few, then more the next year, then more, and finally this year it absolutely exploded with pods.

 

If i dont pick them they eventually dry up & split open, dropping the seeds. 

 

I'd like to hear from experienced growers or those with first hand knowledge as to the best time to pick the pods; when the seeds are at their freshest & most viable.....

 

pic taken mid july 2018

yopoDSC_0679.thumb.jpg.0c24ee547ce14640571b5b7ecc900a2c.jpg

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never grew yopo, so congrats...:):wub:

similar, I did grow, and many seed pods got aborted.

dark glossy, seeds are, what you want!:)

Edited by withdrawl clinic

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How long did it take for your plant to get that big and start producing?  I bought a plant from a different site and it's tiny as compared to yours so I hope it didn't take too long.

 

FWIW I don't know when it's best to pick them but they look like this when you buy the seeds retail which might be of some help.

yopo.thumb.JPG.487ce0a027f04c914f5cc1a969e5e06e.JPG

 

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horrible winds today blew off some pods, some pretty dried out, some still green.  So i went exploring....knife in hand i split open a few pods...one still pretty green and a dried out one.....the dried out pod seems to have a couple fully mature seeds inside whereas the green one had seeds that appeared to be fully formed but still had green (and soft) seed shells.

 

From what I've just observed & hearing from the source of my plant I've determined the best time to pick the pods is after they've dried on the tree but before they split.

 

green pods are too unripened yopoSeedsDSCN2291.thumb.jpg.e30a8e6fc1983aac1fa9836704dbf7c3.jpg

 

dried pod is just right yopoSeedsDSCN2295.thumb.jpg.7310b9c862239af95a5c4c2a4b42d6a3.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Nicely done with the experimentation :)

 

How long did it take for the pods to start forming until they dried out on the tree on average?

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and the greenish pods can ripen (preferably in the not split pod) to a lighter brown, and still germinate,

but they are not good for storing, the seed.

 

pioneer tree, love disturbed, deep soil, no competition..., legume...

my colubrinas (now long gone) took maybe 8 years to produce good pods.

lost most seeds to pests and boring insects?!

 

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Hey Zelly, any chance that they are Cebil rather than Yopo?
Would make sense more with your climate.

incognito (no longer active here?) / moon unit botanica harvest yearly from their tree.
They are on FB, I can ask them to get in contact if you like?

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What are the physical differences between  colubrina  and perigrina ?

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i only have a couple of trees of both and they aren't very old but here is what I have noticed, the colubrina only has a small amount of red dots as shown here colu_(2).thumb.jpg.24fa4810a4247dba0a1f1c83e498d952.jpg 

compared to  perigrina which seems to have more red dots peri_(2).thumb.jpg.fcde930c2de554ad54689efec532ec31.jpg 

 

The trunks seem a bit different (remember I only have a couple to compare so not definitive in anyway) the trunk on the colubrina looks like this colu.thumb.jpg.abb42c6364b58b286dd4a30b8e6b4a96.jpg 

and the perigrina seems to have more swirly patterns, white bands or strips across the trunk and more pointy/sharp bumbs or thorns shown here peri.thumb.jpg.0fd28059cefd1761deef743cd539c376.jpg 

 

The colubrina hasn't produced seed yet but seed I have seen looks kinda squarish like this seeds-raw-cebil-anadenanthera-colubrina-seeds.thumb.png.ccab032231eeb1271f2ab8be42f37f3c.png 

 the perigrina has only produced one pod so far with three seeds only one properly formed and they appeared quite round more like this anadenanthera_peregrina_seeds.thumb.jpg.8b37636190e71847c1280fffe7b308e3.jpg 

Only a small amount of specimens to make a comparison with so not really reliable info but just some things I have noticed between them so far. 

 

The colubrina has no flowers to compare with but here is a pic of a perigrina flower anyway from one of the trees : )

peri_(3).thumb.jpg.b145da77d5121cfdff3f37ce4a438568.jpg

 

 

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Not sure why the pics came out sideways ? sorry about that

 

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Awsome info,  thankyou.

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Posted (edited)

zelly is your tree a yopo or cebil? I thought yopo couldn't handle the frost that well. 

Edited by motherfirefly
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On 02/01/2019 at 3:48 PM, withdrawl clinic said:

and the greenish pods can ripen (preferably in the not split pod) to a lighter brown, and still germinate,

but they are not good for storing, the seed.

 

pioneer tree, love disturbed, deep soil, no competition..., legume...

my colubrinas (now long gone) took maybe 8 years to produce good pods.

lost most seeds to pests and boring insects?!

 

I have a colubrina about 8y.o in the ground for about 3 years that is now about 6m high with a spreading crown of over 5m wide. It flowered first about 5 y.o. and did not set seed until last year at 7 y.o. when I got about 50 good seeds from 6 or 7 pods. Despite (or perhaps because of) extreme drought conditions it has flowered well already and produced 20+ pods that are just ripening. It then went and flowered en-masse a few weeks back. Should have lots of seeds soon.

 

I also have 2 peregrina in large pots... they seem more finicky and delicate (perhaps because of the subtropical and not tropical conditions). I hope to get em in the ground soon to hopefully get em moving..

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the linage on my tree can be traced back to withdrawl clinic who confirms it to be colubrina

 

Since a caapi thrives & a few psychotria viridis survive my winters i suspect a yopo would do just fine here

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4 hours ago, zelly said:

the linage on my tree can be traced back to withdrawl clinic who confirms it to be colubrina

 

Since a caapi thrives & a few psychotria viridis survive my winters i suspect a yopo would do just fine here

At the place where the yopo is growing in pots both those species thrive all year round. Subtropical coastal - absolute minimum in winter of about 1-3C but rarely gets below 5-7C.. 

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looks great man, jealous!  out of curiosity are in a dry climate?  or do they set seed in dry season?  they flower here but never seen a pod once.

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Bump,

My yopo also finally produced lots of pods after about 7 or 8 years.
But i have a issue with some kind of miner beetle, little black spots on the out side on pods sometimes boring right into the seed.
Any ideas?

image.thumb.png.bc47bce9134682339b5671161447006f.png

Edited by vual

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