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The Corroboree

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Fantastic - thanks for the photos!

 

Building a simple top bar hive is the next project for me - planning on starting early next year.

 

Never beekeeped before, but also plan to look into gaining some local Tasmanian training.

 

I'm a strong believer in "no bee no me" theory.

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Beautiful hive mate. 

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Thanks, I followed these plans. My first carpentry  ((( ̄へ ̄井) http://biobees.com/build-a-beehive-free-plans.php
then I did a course in natural beekeeping, which was warre focussed. Totally look into the warre design too!  http://www.warre.biobees.com/?mc_cid=f3c7cf2889&mc_eid=f8b4f169df
It is maybe better in its bio mimicry because it has a vertical design, like a hollow tree.

 

I just can't believe how dumb and egotistical people are using neonicotinoids and practicing monoculture! combined with the bees sensitivity to emf, because they use magnetoreception to navigate, it makes them vulnerable to all sorts of bacteria and pests.:ana:

anyway

The pic at the bottom is a swarm cell, so I have a young queen who would have mated in the local Drone Congregation Area, 
for wild genetic diversity!

^_^

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22 hours ago, absinthium said:

It is maybe better in its bio mimicry because it has a vertical design, like a hollow tree.

Personally, I'm not convinced. Left to themselves, bees often nest horizontally.

As well as rock ledges I have seen them build horizontally along the top of an old wardrobe, under the eaves of a building and even hanging from the rafters of a shed.

800px-Bee_Hive,_Durba_Springs_in_Western_Australia.jpg

Edited by Crop
Spelling again.

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hmm yeah I guess so, but I think there is a tendency for the brood to become honeybound in an enclosed horizontal space, so you need 2 follower boards to adjust the space depending where they are keeping the brood. I reckon you must live somewhere pretty warm because bees like to stay around 35 degrees and they're not going to achieve that on a rock ledge in winter further south. But they are pretty adaptable, like being fed high frustose corn syrup by beekeepers... mm healthy GM. Have you seen 'more that honey" and 'queen of the bees'?bee-ritual_ring_1500bc.thumb.jpg.50d5b4c0a737f2b95c89e54d57b97fc6.jpg

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