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Gimli

Grafting Stock Pros/Cons

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Went with what are probably the most common 5. Feel free to add more below and fill in dot points etc

 

Hylocereus

 

Pros:
Vigorous growth

Quick to propagate

 

Cons:
Rots easier than other stocks

Cold-dormant

Smaller grafting area

Can deform scion or over produce offsets

 

Myrtillocactus

 

Pros:
Longevity

Large grafting area

 

Cons:

Average growth speed (could be a pro, scion dependent)

Slow to propagate (striking roots)

 

Pachanoi

 

Pros:
Easy to graft onto
Easy to handle
Longevity
Can handle heavy scions
Good for slab grafting

Large grafting area

 

Cons:
Not suited to small seedlings
Thirsty

 

Pereskiopsis

 

Pros:
Suited to small seedlings
Vigorous growth
Impale grafting
Can handle little or lots of water

 

Cons:
Constantly offsets
Can't handle heavy offsets unless staked
Covered in glochids

 

Selenicereus

 

Pros:
Quick to propagate
Easy to handle

Vigorous growth

 

Cons:

Similar cons to Hylocereus or Pereskiopsis

Edited by Gimli
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Thanks for this list, will be useful :)

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Over the years I've acquired grafted plants on just about every root stock imaginable.......and every damn one of them  except one has had issues to the point of scion destruction.

 

Old school graft masters preferred & used harrisia jusberti as a root stock which is the best choice for long term (30+ yrs and counting) grafts.

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wow Z, 30 years on a stock. thats amazing...

 

I really like cereus for trichos. Nothing grows faster or hardier for me. Its about 4 times the speed of trichs as stock. Downside is that i haven't had lophs grow on cereus even when the union is perfect...

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I also like Cereus as a stock, I've had lophs do well on them, and 4 years later still growing.

The problem with cereus is that cuts take forever to root.

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I go more for the, "ouch" factor, meaning how easy, I get spines, up my skin.

I got as well some insect pests which can kill, dragon fruit related stock.

for me:

1, peres

2, trichocereus

3, dragon fruit

 

 

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10 hours ago, Glaukus said:

I also like Cereus as a stock, I've had lophs do well on them, and 4 years later still growing.

The problem with cereus is that cuts take forever to root.

Hey Glauc, any chance on some pics? I had probably a dozen lophs on huge cereus that just didn't seem to go anywhere in the last several months so i just assumed that they didn't work real well... Maybe if you have had good results I should try again... Its by far the best stock up here in the tropics. Oh, the other downside to cereus is that it is much more susceptible to scale, if it wasn't for the cereus i don't think i would see it in my gardens...

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Here's one (it got smashed by spider mites last summer).

IMAG1270_1.thumb.jpg.7a6c11faee71c517b43aa8b03fc299da.jpg

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On 27/10/2018 at 3:39 AM, Gimli said:

Went with what are probably the most common 5. Feel free to add more below and fill in dot points etc

 

Hylocereus

 

Pros:
Vigorous growth

Quick to propagate

 

Cons:
Rots easier than other stocks

Cold-dormant

Smaller grafting area

Can deform scion or over produce offsets

 

Myrtillocactus

 

Pros:
Longevity

Large grafting area

 

Cons:

Average growth speed (could be a pro, scion dependent)

Slow to propagate (striking roots)

 

Pachanoi

 

Pros:
Easy to graft onto
Easy to handle
Longevity
Can handle heavy scions
Good for slab grafting

Large grafting area

 

Cons:
Not suited to small seedlings
Thirsty

 

Pereskiopsis

 

Pros:
Suited to small seedlings
Vigorous growth
Impale grafting
Can handle little or lots of water

 

Cons:
Constantly offsets
Can't handle heavy offsets unless staked
Covered in glochids

 

Selenicereus

 

Pros:
Quick to propagate
Easy to handle

Vigorous growth

 

Cons:

Similar cons to Hylocereus or Pereskiopsis

 

 

Pachanoi is most assuredly suited for small seedlings and small areoles to boot....2091554247_TrichocereusscopulicolaxTrichocereusterscheckii18.thumb.jpg.7776dd9fbd33d39feb4d0329a52bb5ab.jpg1317705238_6June18variegatedcrestedpachanoiareolegraft79days48.thumb.jpg.1a95cb5501dd77690e12784dfbc7f8e5.jpg1276352372_pupgrafting.thumb.png.4e20dece7681dd557825e62f998f7231.png

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19 hours ago, Glaukus said:

Here's one (it got smashed by spider mites last summer).

IMAG1270_1.thumb.jpg.7a6c11faee71c517b43aa8b03fc299da.jpg

cool, that one's got good growth. I'll leave the ones i didn't degraft yet and see what happens...

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I have some Caput Medusa scions on Ferocactus Glaucescens. Growth is not what I'd call explosive by any means but it's slow, steady, and does not produce deformed looking scion. The short stock combined with a 'normal' looking scion in my opinion makes an attractive plant.

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