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Teljkon

Moringa roots VS Foundation

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So i chopped down two of my Moringas today, they were my most productive plantings. However they were in a bad spot. The thinking behind this was that it was to close to the house. A family friend, who i don't think knows what the hell he was talking about, said that the roots will bust up your foundation. The tree was so soft to the axe I have to imagine its not damaging to cement foundations. 

Anyone have any notes on these or experience managing them. I have a ton of seeds an I want to re sow in the right place any advice??  

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I took the time to take the flowers and the seeds. 

DSCF4145[1].JPG

DSCF4146[1].JPG

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The thing about roots is they can be soft and fleshy yet still exert incredible force. 

Have you ever seen an abandoned road? Within a few years the bitumen is torn up by weeds and wattle trees growing through it. The seeds germinate and the roots find a crack and slowly swell with water and life. 

Similarly,  a city footpath with 40 year old fig trees tossing the slabs of concrete aside in slow motion. 

 

There's a lot of power there - plant wisely with the mature size of the plant in mind

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Honestly they are not a  problem as long as i am around to wack them back substantially on a regular basis. How ever I am not gong to be here so they have to be moved. Just looking for tips on how well they keep. the sizes I am getting for mature trees seem unrealistic in comparison to most specimens I have encountered. Looking for verification more than anything.

 

 

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I missed this, but on foundations, trees and soil.... 

 

It's not just physical root force on foundations, it's the change In  moisture status, which can have parts of the foundation move differently and then cracking the foundation, or exert the movement into the house frame(cracking internal walls, jamming doors ect). 

 

If it's a "reactive"  clay this action is more prominent, no probs in sand (doesn't shrink/crack or swell with changing water status) .

 

Plants can draw out the water in their zone of roots and change the soil state if a reactive soil. Also some pour water into a drying soil and cause the differential movement. 

 

In Australia that's H1, H2 and E Foundation classifications(high reactive clay content, close to the surface). 

 

 

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