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Inyan

Post your Smallest grafts here if you dare

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tinytim.thumb.png.df61fd4e7354e3d7b9105298ef543ea5.pngCotyledons have not dropped/opened on picture to your left. 5a75347c3c264_seedlingtoseedlingTuedaySept192017at12_15_25PM.thumb.jpg.ae960024294fe6e63a6bd918deb11b28.jpg Seedlings grafted together in the middle of a peresiopsis. This is how we have fun.

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These are darn close to the smallest grafts I've done using Trichocereus as a stock plant. Pictures, or it didn't happen. These are far enough along though to warrant showing as you can tell from the raised tissue on the stock plant and callousing. I know many others in here are great at grafting small seedlings like this so please... share those pictures here if you dare. I'd like to keep a nice album going so people can reference these pictures to see how small is possible as well as how to place seedlings, etc. for those smaller type grafts. This should be fun and educational for those that don't know how to graft and just plain fun for those that do know how to graft. Seedlings in this care are all Trichocereus scopulicola x T. terscheckii. The first two pictures are the same graft. I've presented a close up and another picture further back so you can get a few ore details ironed out.

Trichocereus scopulicola x T. terscheckii 67.jpg

Trichocereus scopulicola x T. terscheckii  68.jpg

Trichocereus scopulicola x T. terscheckii  469.jpg

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Nice work as always inyan. I will post some tomorrow

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14 minutes ago, Jackdaripper said:

Nice work as always inyan. I will post some tomorrow

Your quite the accomplished grafter yourself my friend. I can't wait to see your babies tomorrow.

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This is one i cant help but post now

20180206_151603.jpg

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11 hours ago, Jackdaripper said:

This is one i cant help but post now

20180206_151603.jpg

Correct these old eyes of mine if I'm mistaken, but you have a double seedling graft on the first and a triple graft on the second? Great work JackDaRipper as always.

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Here are a few more micro grafts. All done 2-3 weeks old. Or as you say. Before the ears drop

20180214_160808.jpg

20180214_160817.jpg

20180214_160626.jpg

20180214_160823.jpg

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There is even a quad in there

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3 hours ago, Jackdaripper said:

There is even a quad in there

I like that quad graft my friend. 

 

Now, for the folks who don't know, a quad graft is often done with the use of increased humidity. Meaning you generally amp up the humidity via a sealed container or some such after also giving your stock cacti a dry spell. Being careful not to water your grafts till they have taken. Watering your stock cacti can cause those little fellows to float right off the top even a few days after grafting. For myself, when I use that method I will often not water my stock for several days to a full week prior to grafting depending on the temperatures for that week. 

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My First ever graft done about 5 days ago. I believe the seedling was approaching 1 month old.

 

No idea if it took. It hasn't shriveled up and died or popped of, so fingers crossed!

 

It's from a t. Scop X t. Scop seed packet purchased from ebay

IMG_20180312_114024.jpg

Edited by Lil Pup
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By no means my smallest....... but damn is it gonna be nice.  

 

From a batch of varigated astro asterias. Eventhough this one isn't showing the varigated trait it's easy to see why it's here

20180311_141719.jpg

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1 hour ago, Lil Pup said:

My First ever graft done about 5 days ago. I believe the seedling was approaching 1 month old.

 

No idea if it took. It hasn't shriveled up and died or popped of, so fingers crossed!

 

It's from a t. Scop X t. Scop seed packet purchased from ebay

IMG_20180312_114024.jpg

Congrats on your first attempt. I sincerely hope it takes for you. Now, I do have glasses and even then my prescription ran out so I may not be seeing things correctly. With that said, it looks like there is water pooling up from your Pereskiopsis which could cause your graft not to take especially so if this was the first day... you say day 5... so probably not an issue at all, but I thought I'd point it out nonetheless. It is really hard to gauge as you also use high humidity which is exactly what I use as well when I'm not using parafilm. So, please, do not get alarmed. I'm more or less using your picture as a guide to point out some problems which could occur with a graft of this type and your picture seems to show some of the warning signs I look for on day 1... not necessarily day 5. I also see some browning at the callous or union point which is a good thing to see with an open air style graft in my opinion as it indicates that the liquid atop the graft is probably more likely from the air and not the union site itself even though that is where it has collected. Too much water pushing up from the Pereskiopsis itself can cause and has caused a few of my own attempts to graft to float off during day 1-2 mostly. This is why I will not water a Pereskiopsis a few days to even a week prior to grafting if I am not using parafilm or weight to hold my scion/seedling secure. Similarly, I will not water this style graft without parafilm or weight for a week after the graft is made. If I use parafilm, I'll water the whole time before and after. 

 

Great method you have chosen by the way, I've seen some expert grafters using that technique come up with 95% of their grafts taking on a frequent enough basis to say it is definitely a worthwhile approach and it saves time over using parafilm. The biggest downsides to this method for me however is simply having to remember not to water the soil directly before and after, not being able to be reckless and bump your grafts, and of course the added need for some good humidity. This graft by the way and the setup I see... much better than my first attempts as I lost quite a few to overwatering and or not enough humidity. Luckily for me, in the summer the humidity is generally high enough were I have lived to allow me to graft without the use of humidity domes and the like. I still like to use them though with this method as they keep air currents from blowing on my grafts which can dry out and knock off the grafts as well. 

 

Thanks for sharing your first attempt with us. It really looks like you've done your homework. While I admit I get overly excited seeing my own seedlings pop up as I know it means grafting time is soon upon us, I get more excited to see the work of those who are doing things for the first time. It also means you will soon be an expert cacti grafter and will soon realize there really is not much skill at all involved in grafting. At least not much more than that compared to riding a bicycle. Sure, you need practice and frequent practice every few days to a week is best when starting out in my opinion, but once you get the swing of it your going to be in grafting mode. The addiction will take over and you will find yourself always looking for more seed to graft.

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1 hour ago, Jackdaripper said:

By no means my smallest....... but damn is it gonna be nice.  

 

From a batch of varigated astro asterias. Eventhough this one isn't showing the varigated trait it's easy to see why it's here

20180311_141719.jpg

I think this little one is small enough to count though my friend. Despite being a clear phatty with personality. It definitely looks like you use a lot less humidity than I typically use, with this method, but we also both know your methods give you stellar results. I'd like to point out some positives I see with your graft for those just learning to graft. 

Number 1, there is no standing water on your callous/union area between your scion/seedling and your stock/Pereskiopsis.

Number 2, you can see the cut area is not drying up too fast as the vacuoles are not raised and there is a slight darkening of the cut area to include some brown areas. All perfectly fine in most instances and indicative of a graft that will likely soon start pumping and jumping.

 

With all of that said, a graft done on parafilm would of held a bit more moisture... the calloused area might be more raised and dome like as the parafilm keeps the humidity just high enough and the wind down enough that the cut tissue often grows upwards over the top of the cut skin. The faster the cut area of the stock grows... the faster the healing can take place and the faster the seedling could take off. Other factors are still of course at play such as lighting, temperature, quality of soil, etc. which also play a big role.

 

Thanks for sharing again my friend. I always love looking at your grafts and your cacti. You are truly someone who knows their stuff when it comes to grafting... never mind your freakishly awesome collection. Now, if we can only inspire a few more experts and newbies alike to share in this thread the sharing can really begin. I suspect you are guilty of looking at others experiences and failures to gain your level of expertise. By sharing our experiences and paying attention to our failures... that is how great grafters like JackDaRipper are born. Thankfully, we have a great many gifted grafters on SAB to learn from.

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Cheers for the feedback! Little update on the first one...it didn't take. All good though! I've ordered some parafilm-m and read up on some other techniques, I believe that not drying the pere out before I decided to graft was most likely my undoing. 

 

While I wait to get some more pereskiopsis stock going, I just decided to mess around a bit. It looks like a much more solid bond than the last

IMG_20180403_160819.jpg

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IMG_20180403_160840.jpg

Edited by Lil Pup
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Thats red cactus is beatiful!

 

What is the seedling you added?

 

One tip though, the red one i'd expect it to produce auxin that stops other branches from growing to give it apical dominance.

Never done this myself, but i have doubts on how well this approach will work.

Perhaps other members with more grafting experience can chime in on this

 

In my experience grafting works well (but less than 95%) on watered pere (even hydro pere)

Never compared with dry pere though

 

Edited by DualWieldRake
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Hey friendos, I'm just popping in to marvel at your sweet darlings and pop a few grafting whippersnapper questions of my own, cos I have some little lophlets about 10 days old. 

1. Are there special tricks to grafting stuff less than 1 month old?  I've never grafted stuff under 4 weeks.
2. I bought parafilm for the first time cos Inyan here said it's the business: Any hot tips for using it? 

A couple of questions I have for using parafilm on peres/trich stock; does it need to seal the scion to the stock airtight? (a) will this keep humidity? (b) therefore not require a dome?
Is there a higher risk of infection being sealed into the joining area, therefore a need to use more aseptic/infection control measures?

Also a general cacti question; I have a sharxx grafted to a 40cm PC stump that ballooned up over the summer.  During its growth the stump tried to pup about 10 times and i meticulously admonished it, cutting off every attempt.  Lately the sharxx and its stock look rather dehydrated below the top 20cm of tip growth and no matter how much water that has been thrown on it I have seen no change.  I was hoping to leave it on another season but if it has stopped I'll cut it.  Any ideas why it would do this?

I will pop up some grafts soon!

Edited by Mapacho
mlem

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On 4/25/2018 at 0:38 AM, Mapacho said:

Hey friendos, I'm just popping in to marvel at your sweet darlings and pop a few grafting whippersnapper questions of my own, cos I have some little lophlets about 10 days old. 

1. Are there special tricks to grafting stuff less than 1 month old?  I've never grafted stuff under 4 weeks.
2. I bought parafilm for the first time cos Inyan here said it's the business: Any hot tips for using it? 

A couple of questions I have for using parafilm on peres/trich stock; does it need to seal the scion to the stock airtight? (a) will this keep humidity? (b) therefore not require a dome?
Is there a higher risk of infection being sealed into the joining area, therefore a need to use more aseptic/infection control measures?

Also a general cacti question; I have a sharxx grafted to a 40cm PC stump that ballooned up over the summer.  During its growth the stump tried to pup about 10 times and i meticulously admonished it, cutting off every attempt.  Lately the sharxx and its stock look rather dehydrated below the top 20cm of tip growth and no matter how much water that has been thrown on it I have seen no change.  I was hoping to leave it on another season but if it has stopped I'll cut it.  Any ideas why it would do this?

I will pop up some grafts soon!

Sorry I missed this. Here you go my friend. 

 

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Watch the video and you will be grafting small 10 day old seedlings like it was yesterdays news. With a little practice... you will graft small areoles like this variegated crested pachanoi...areolegraft1.thumb.jpg.932415eff535dc5155607f8eef43aaf3.jpg

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Thanks for the link!  I am super keen to get into areole grafting! 

Here are some baby texana after a month.  These were grafted at exactly 10 days post sowing.  Looks like they all took!  I just need some free time to do more.

 

p.s. please excuse the 6-year-old smartphone quality.

32332436_156893788488520_4836226234352402432_n.jpg

 

Also i just watched the vid...my "parafilm" is much tougher, in tape form, and not opaque like that.  Do you have an ebay link or something to the stuff you're using?  Cheers!

Edited by Mapacho
question
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More of a question than a porn shot. I was recently gifted some alleged Opuntia humifusa and while saving the larger pads for growing I used two unrooted pads for grafting little loph pups.

I banded them on and put them someplace deeply shaded and coolish for 9 days. The smaller of the two had its scion shrivel a touch more than I expected. Its larger sister still looks plump.

Obviously I'll return it to a lower light area until the pad swells, should I put it under a cover to keep humidity a little higher while the pad tries to root?

Shrivelled_caes.jpg

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3 hours ago, Elrik said:

More of a question than a porn shot. I was recently gifted some alleged Opuntia humifusa and while saving the larger pads for growing I used two unrooted pads for grafting little loph pups.

I banded them on and put them someplace deeply shaded and coolish for 9 days. The smaller of the two had its scion shrivel a touch more than I expected. Its larger sister still looks plump.

Obviously I'll return it to a lower light area until the pad swells, should I put it under a cover to keep humidity a little higher while the pad tries to root?

Shrivelled_caes.jpg

Opuntia humifusa can take freezing temperatures and floods both without skipping a beat.

 

For grafting purposes, I personally prefer to graft on nice plump vigorously growing specimens.

 

My theory being that if my stock is dehydrated and in need of water itself... how much fluid is it going to be pumping into my graft?

 

You band kept your specimen from floating off for 9 days... provided it had an abundance of fluid that the stock could push into your graft that would help.

 

Why use a pad that is not swollen to the hilt?

 

The more swollen a stock is the more it can push its nutrients into the scion.

 

Why use an unrooted stock to graft?

 

Without roots, a stock will have to use its own reserve energy and fluids to grow new tissues to support a union between the stock and scion.

 

Why was the graft moved to a lower light area?

 

Light stimulates growth.

 

As for your question as to humidity in relation to your Opuntia rooting....

 

Humidity is not essential for rooting your Opuntia. Rooting your Opuntia can be best expedited by increasing bottom heat and soaking your Opuntia humifusa in water and nutrients. Personally, I would grow that Opuntia in a bog style environment with a heaping dose of fertilizer added to the water. I'd go with a nice aqua blue, green, or muck brown color to the water to ensure a good amount of fertilizer was added.

 

Humidity is more important however in a graft of this type to keep the graft union hydrated so living tissue can form before that same tissue dries out. Even a small imperfection such as a double cut when you are slicing your stock or scion can create a space for an air bubble which is hopefully mitigated by the pressure of the rubber band and the increased humidity in your growth chamber... or one could simply wrap with co-ban or another material to hold more moisture in at the graft site itself.

 

Nice collection by the way. 

I assume you went with Opuntia humifusa as you wanted a slower growing stock or a stock that would not rot if overexposed to water? Either way, it was a good choice.

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Inyan do you keep your freshly done grafts outside in the shade? I always bring mines inside in low light, not even on a windowsill, but your comment made me realize it might not be a good idea.

 

Speaking of Opuntia, I've done a few grafts on Austrocylindropuntia subulata lately, seems like a great stock. Loves water, has leaves, growth extremely fast and has a large cambium. The unions seem to happen very quickly too, only 6 days since I grafted this one and it's already cracking the parafilm seemingly.

IMG_20180620_204829.thumb.jpg.ff0c71ed6d4f845bb0ca7cc64f402c64.jpg

 

Here are my smallest grafts, not in terms of scion but in terms of stock. Young hylocereus undatus seedlings. Want to do a kind of tricho bouquet, I had way too many Clyde x Chalaensis seedlings so I thought what the heck let's try it. The test one I did beforehand at the front took.

IMG_20180620_164021-3024x2268.thumb.jpg.92c046a729385811d4ecffe5428a6806.jpg

 

Btw, I followed your advice and purchased some parafilm, loving it so far!

Edited by MeanGreen
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28 minutes ago, MeanGreen said:

Inyan do you keep your freshly done grafts outside in the shade? I always bring mines inside in low light, not even on a windowsill, but your comment made me realize it might not be a good idea.

 

Speaking of Opuntia, I've done a few grafts on Austrocylindropuntia subulata lately, seems like a great stock. Loves water, has leaves, growth extremely fast and has a large cambium. The unions seem to happen very quickly too, only 6 days since I grafted this one and it's already cracking the parafilm seemingly.

IMG_20180620_204829.thumb.jpg.ff0c71ed6d4f845bb0ca7cc64f402c64.jpg

 

Here are my smallest grafts, not in terms of scion but in terms of stock. Young hylocereus undatus seedlings. Want to do a kind of tricho bouquet, I had way too many Clyde x Chalaensis seedlings so I thought what the heck let's try it. The test one I did beforehand at the front took.

IMG_20180620_164021-3024x2268.thumb.jpg.92c046a729385811d4ecffe5428a6806.jpg

 

Btw, I followed your advice and purchased some parafilm, loving it so far!

 

I only move to the shade if the stock or scion was in the shade to begin with or I'm not using something to boost the humidity like parafilm.

 

However, if you use a growth chamber to increase humidity, you have to be aware that chambers will also increase the heat which can be a bad thing if they are placed in direct sun too long during the heat of the day. You might try intermittently bring your grafts out if you are using a humidity chamber with good effect if done for just a few hours off and on throughout the day.

 

As regards your first graft, it looks like you need to go ahead and slice the sides off of that graft. Use a brand new razor blade for this as this will enable your graft to breath. It looks like it has taken and all is good. Dust with sulfur.

 

Alternately, if your not sure of your steady hands... suck up a bit of sulfur dust in a syringe. Poke a few needle holes gradually over the outer edge of one side of your graft and and then the other side do the same. Slowly introduce a bit of that sulfur as a dust onto the surface of your graft. 

 

Great job with the parafilm by the way!

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That pad wasn't shrivelled at the start, lol, but it was one of the youngest ones and so lost water more readily. The wide point on it in that picture is just under 4 cm.

I got a bunch of unrooted pads because a tree had grown over the cacti and the owner wasn't planning to keep the whole cactus, just maybe the base to replant somewhere else and I grafted two little pups out of enthusiasm ;)

I put the fresh graft in the cooler shade because it was so small and young and had a large cut surface area relative to its size. Other pads will be rooted and get new growth before I try grafting to them.

And yeah, I got these for slower more natural grafted growth as well as the possibility of hypocotyl grafting for rot-proof taproots. I also ordered some Opuntia compressa seed noted for large roots for the same tactic.

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2 hours ago, Elrik said:

That pad wasn't shrivelled at the start, lol, but it was one of the youngest ones and so lost water more readily. The wide point on it in that picture is just under 4 cm.

I got a bunch of unrooted pads because a tree had grown over the cacti and the owner wasn't planning to keep the whole cactus, just maybe the base to replant somewhere else and I grafted two little pups out of enthusiasm ;)

I put the fresh graft in the cooler shade because it was so small and young and had a large cut surface area relative to its size. Other pads will be rooted and get new growth before I try grafting to them.

And yeah, I got these for slower more natural grafted growth as well as the possibility of hypocotyl grafting for rot-proof taproots. I also ordered some Opuntia compressa seed noted for large roots for the same tactic.

 

Well that makes more sense now that at least the pad was not shriveled at the start.

 

While it is possible to graft cacti to stock that is not rooted, I find that my luck with that is better on stock that was actively growing at the time of the cut and then grafted within a week of cutting.

 

I like your idea of rot proof taproots as well. This stock will definitely give you that as well as your more natural looking growth.

 

As for your enthusiasm, I can't say I might not have tried this myself if I had a surplus of both stock and scion material.

 

My own problem is generally not enough stock and too many seedlings, but that can change with the drop of a hat depending on the season.

 

Your definitely one of the smart cats which is why I posed those questions to you my friend. 

 

For me, I have to ask why something doesn't work and what can I do to fix it this time and if not this time then I've learned something for next time.

 

My best piece of advice on the graft you have shown the picture of... water it heavily next time. Opuntia humifusa can take wet feet.

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