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Gimli

Acacia alkaloid levels

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Recently I've been cutting back the acacia trees we are using as hosts for sandalwood.

 

While chatting to a wise man who frequents the forum, he said the alkaloid levels in these trees might be slightly elevated due to the fact they are being parasitized but cannot be exactly sure. I've only found threads referring to weather/climate in this regards

 

Can anyone comment/speculate on this theory?

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I've read about similar behaviour in plants, even the sound of them beeing parasitized (bug gnawing sounds) would make them produce more alkaloids.

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I've read that wasp burls in acacia contain elevated amounts of alkaloids (believe it was in one of Trout's works, but will try and fine a definitive reference in the next day or so).

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At EGA there was mention of wasp burls on an endangered Victorian Acacia containing elevated alkaloid levels. 

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3 hours ago, Justler said:

At EGA there was mention of wasp burls on an endangered Victorian Acacia containing elevated alkaloid levels. 

So if the tree in question is endangered, why would anyone be taking burls from them? 

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On 12/13/2017 at 2:15 PM, Glaukus said:

So if the tree in question is endangered, why would anyone be taking burls from them? 

Interesting, the argument was presented as a means of assisting the population by removing the parasitic element. After reading your comment and doing a bit of research on burls I get the impression removal of such would open the plant to infection.

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On 16/12/2017 at 9:41 AM, Justler said:

Interesting, the argument was presented as a means of assisting the population by removing the parasitic element. After reading your comment and doing a bit of research on burls I get the impression removal of such would open the plant to infection.

Think of burls as scar tissue, the plant is trying to protect itself. 

I don't think anyone has the right to touch a wild population of such a rare plant for any reason.

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^  Um...what about....for conservation purposes?...I guess there's the risk of some goofball tromping on in with dirty gumboots and introducing some pathogen or weed seeds e.t.c and wiping them out....but what about "experts in bringing a species back from the brink"?....would that be a good enough reason?...   that whole Wollemi pine story springs to mind...

 

I don't mean to call you out Glauky, I also, consider said wattle, some kinda super holy, sacred, like....unicorn wattle, but your last statement reads; forbidden under any circumstances.

 

But i occasionally hear whispers of private collections having success with repopulation so maybe the wild one's should be left the fuck alone now...i dunno, just spending 2 cents..

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16 minutes ago, freakazoid said:

^  Um...what about....for conservation purposes?...I guess there's the risk of some goofball tromping on in with dirty gumboots and introducing some pathogen or weed seeds e.t.c and wiping them out....but what about "experts in bringing a species back from the brink"?....would that be a good enough reason?...   that whole Wollemi pine story springs to mind...

 

I don't mean to call you out Glauky, I also, consider said wattle, some kinda super holy, sacred, like....unicorn wattle, but your last statement reads; forbidden under any circumstances.

 

But i occasionally hear whispers of private collections having success with repopulation so maybe the wild one's should be left the fuck alone now...i dunno, just spending 2 cents..

Go ahead man, call me out!

I didn't read anything about conservation in post. I saw a red flag for amateur bark rippers to start targeting trees that are already stressed from attack. The topic title doesn't attract conservation types from a search...

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