Drake1337

Three Brothers and replanting

9 posts in this topic

So these are ready for transplantation l would say. The weather is starting to warm up so l would say its a good time? Anyone able to pass on some advice to planting these rare wattles out and about? I know its a good idea to add a steak until they are old enough.

 

Haven't been about on the forums for a while as l have just been busy. Also mobile site, l cannot find the search bar. New topic wont hurt l suppose on this subject. I did spy the topic about general acacia though these are not just common acacia. 

 

Thanks for the advice people.

20170810_130507.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Hey, I plant out my natives early autumn and early spring.  Have planted out  this time of the year but have found in late winter we are hit with bad westy winds and the plants can get shocked by this. 

 

Edited by smithy
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What smithy said. I've had the most success when planting out in autumn, but spring is also a good time. Just make sure they are well protected from the wind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Staking them will help as they tend to droop like a weeping willow as they grow, also these guys like a bit of rocky soil...it will also help to get some soil from a another acacia (any species I believe) for inoculation (there's a thread here);

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, staking is a must with all acacia's I believe , as they grow to fast for there root system . You can remove the stake usually after 2 to 3 years when they slow down growing and start looking like a tree.   I don't use no  inoculation or other soil from another species for courtii. they grow and perform well without it.  

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks loads for all the replies people! I really appreciate it. I think l will wait until we are closer to spring. Will sow another batch of seeds soon so they are ready to be replanted for Autumn.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never staked an acacia, I just water them in once and let em go, if they are strong they will be fine in my experience, only the strong live where I am, sometimes they get chewed by wild animals, sometimes they bend to nearly touching the ground sometimes they stunt or perish cause its to dry, I sow min 50+ seeds of what I want and am left with at least a few who make it through my tests and there the ones I want to grow and eventually collect seed from, I don't cuddle them much, just an occasional water when in pots and one water when potted out, I do put some branches/logs around them as a border and woodchips around them to help with moisture (hasn't rained here for well over a month but strong ones will surprisingly live) and when I have them well rooted in larger pots they are much stronger than planting out tubes.

Tho saying that I only have 2 courtii plants (grown from 2 free seeds I got from someone here a while back thanks very much ) and I am letting them get to a pretty decent size before planting out and will prob care for them a bit more than I would an acuminata or other popular types. I am going to be putting one in the ground soon when it starts to rain again, its in a deep narrow pot so will have an awesome root system to begin with and is around waist height.

But yeh doubt I will be staking them tho, seems similar to helping a caterpillar out of its cocoon or a chook out of its egg type thing, it may just make them weak for life?

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtii have a much greater tendency to lean over, they need staking. 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was taught to tie stakes very low .  Let the tops flail around and find their strength but prevent the trunk-proper and its roots from suffering.  Dont know if it applies to this species but i'll throw it out there.  

 

FWIW i never see this technique in use ( trees, nursery stock), but common practise isnt always best practise.

 

Also you can check if roots are innoculated by squishing a root nodule and checking for pinkness.

 

Id expect some soil from innoculated roots would be all thats needed to spread the bacteria, as suggested earlier.  Cant state this unequivocally but you can always perform the check to see if it worked.

Edited by ThunderIdeal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now