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Distracted

Big cactus, quite old, South Australian riverlands

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Hi!

Check this out!

TORRENS22-2.jpgTORRENS22-4.jpg

TORRENS22-3.jpg

Any ideas?

TORRENS22-7.jpg

TORRENS22-6.jpgTORRENS22-5.jpg

Edited by Distracted
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That short spined fat one you have close ups of is clearly the plant that did the rounds from an eBay seller called "kerstincactus" seller called Ben. He was selling from the Riverland in SA. His seller account has been cancelled on eBay now though.

 

Most people call it "South Australian Short Spined Terscheckii".  or SA SS Tersch.

 

Absolutely fucking gorgeous.

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I see peruvianus and tershy together in the clump. But that other big fatty...ooohh mama.

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dude im quids in, for as much as I can get of the big fella, and fill up the rest of the ute with the other, PM me.

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yeah cool, sorry got a bit ahead of myself there

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Very nice old plants

cool pics Distracted

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What's going on the last pic? Plant Spirit? Cactus fairy? Etheric Shaman?

 

Thanks for the pics, amazing to see old plants...

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Haha lens flare. The picture was mostly grey so I did what I could to restore colour properly, it kinda brought out a weird colour in the flare.

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Very interesting.

 

I'm quite sure the farmer who owned the property wasn't that ebayer though. These were found on the property hosting the 'River Dreaming Festival' doof. A friend mentioned to the property owner about how he liked the cacti and he replied in short "Why would you like cacti?". He didn't seem to hold any value to it, more of something that was just growing and had been there for a while. His family had owned the property for around 100 years so it came there sometime within that period.

If you look in the background you can see a massive san pedro too, he had some huasca and spachianus, a few others too.

 

 

I wanted to pay him for a cutting but it never came up, by the end he seemed a little irate at the condition people were leaving the grounds in among other things.

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awesome pictures , it's so dense all I can say is wow love seeing awesome pics like these 

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I'm not too surprised you said you didn't think the ebayer in question that I mentioned owned that property. From the email exchanges I had with the ebayer a while ago he didn't own the plants, he said they were on a friends property and that he had "access to them". The guy selling them on ebay also wasn't actually into cactus, he just liked that he could sell them for money, he certainly wasn't a cactus addict with the passion for them himself.

 

It's a pity that people weren't respecting his property, but I can't say that surprises me at all. At least you know where they are and maybe you can go back one day and chat to the owner again.

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Nice plants. Tantalizingly difficult photos to ID. Is it just one massive clump of three varieties and then the fat one on its own?

 

In the zoomed out shots, which is the short-spined tersheckii? I've never seen that one before, it's cool, but nothing looks fat enough in the long shots for tersheckii or validus. I'm curious about that.

 

The big fella is a form I have seen before in the riverland. I met a grower who planted one around 30 yrs ago. That was in 2010 when i lived up there so let's say 40yrs in the ground. Came as a mail-order from Victoria, pretty sure via Germany. My cutting of it went through an id thread several years ago, consensus was chilensis hybrid (EG). I'd bet money this one you found is the same clone, looks like the same spination and moreso the habit of it.

 

The peruvianus looks familiar as well, also in a garden up that way. Grows on weird angles and can droop like in those pics. Looks good young but pretty ragged as it gets older, i only planted the one for that reason and never propagated it. Some varieties just don't grow up pretty - often we don't think about that. This one is an example.

 

Do you have zoomed in shots of the individual plants? The one on the right in the last pic intrigues me most from an id-perspective. I don't think it's a trich, I reckon a mytillocactus or something like, but not actually, a cleistocactus. I have one I collected up there, it gets fat and tall, grows slow, has semi-opening lilac flowers. I like it I just can't find my photos of it right now and I never id'd it myself. But if it is a trich, would be interesting that one especially.

 

This also confirms my ongoing suspicion that cactus are excellent host plants for quandong, left first pic.

 

The riverland has some great gardens planted out during the last 40 years. Some trich varieties are shared between them, and some are unique to each garden, it might reveal a lot about what was imported into Oz in the 60-80s to know what standard forms are (like sausage plant) and which are more unique. Big variation in the gardeners in that area too. It's really important to know where the limit is in asking people for cactus from their home gardens, let alone having a mad doof there!!

 

Here's my riverland monster below.

 

 

riverland monster.jpg

Edited by Micromegas
mistake

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