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Hi guys, I received these loph seeds. One is advertised as normal Lophophora williamsii the other is Lophophora williamsii texinsis. Is there differing sizes with these seeds? Or is one a different thing?

post-16958-0-57117400-1443523590_thumb.j

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One is either a different thing or once were loph seeds, before being pulverised into tiny pieces in the post

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Well the tiny little pieces have sprouted into this. Not anything much yet.

post-16958-0-30586800-1443524123_thumb.j

And the bigger seeds are this.

post-16958-0-28698300-1443524195_thumb.j

Edited by Bedofspines

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something else it is then :wink:

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The smaller 'seeds' are surely just crushed up particles :unsure:

From what I know, Texenis is the OG variety of L.W... a very slow grower!

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If so, the crushed particles are sprouting. Under my 20x magnifier they are very triangullar. Time will tell I suppose.

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You sure they are actually sprouting? The only thing I can see in the first picture is cobweb mold. Do you see any green in there at all?

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Now that you mention it no green at all u pulled 'em out and your right seems to just be mold :( lol. On the plus side it shall not spread to the rest :) cheers mate

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US postal machinery can and will crush seeds to dust. It is essential to use at least a padded envelope - I add an additional liner of bubblewrap to that.

Also, the description Texinsis probably means it comes from Texas - it is no more a different variety of Lophophora williamsii than a Texan is a different variety of Homo sapiens. But the taxonomy of Lophophora is a total mess, with loads of non-existent ´varieties´ being invented and sold.

Edited by Spanishfly
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These were in australlia, still I'm not surprised tho, is there anything to the Lophophora williamsii var pentagona and Lophophora williamsii var pluricostata from what I can tell it's different rib habits but am I likely to get seed that would keep the 5 rib habit, or could it happen to any lw seed?

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Also, the description Texinsis probably means it comes from Texas - it is no more a different variety of Lophophora williamsii than a Texan is a different variety of Homo sapiens. But the taxonomy of Lophophora is a total mess, with loads of non-existent ´varieties´ being invented and sold.

http://www.shaman-australis.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=34935&p=452194

These were in australlia, still I'm not surprised tho, is there anything to the Lophophora williamsii var pentagona and Lophophora williamsii var pluricostata from what I can tell it's different rib habits but am I likely to get seed that would keep the 5 rib habit, or could it happen to any lw seed?

Yeah all lophs start with 5 stable ribs. I wouldn't put any stock in those names though. The second one is just redundant and there is no known origin for pentagona. Really the main question is are they self-fertile or not. According to this link they aren't, but there are so many ifs and buts, grow them and see.. http://www.magicactus.com/lw_pentagona.html

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I read that article - with a LARGE pinch of salt. IMHO var. pentagona has no real validity - the International Cactaceae Systematics Group recognise only two true species of Lophophora with just a handful of taxa.

As has been stated all Lophophora williamsii start with just 5 ribs and produce more later - although one of mine has retained its original five to quite a large size - but that is just natural variation that occurs in any species of plant or animal. And all Lophophora williamsii that I have grown have been self fertile.

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Yeah all lophs start with 5 stable ribs. I wouldn't put any stock in those names though. The second one is just redundant and there is no known origin for pentagona. Really the main question is are they self-fertile or not. According to this link they aren't, but there are so many ifs and buts, grow them and see.. http://www.magicactus.com/lw_pentagona.html

Taken from "The Biogeography, Ecology, and Taxonomy of Lophophora (Cactaceae)", by Edward F. Anderson (1969):

Lophophora williamsii var. pentagona Croizat, Desert Plant Life 16: 44. 1944, was based on a photograph by Y. Wright in Cact. Succ. Jour. 3: 55. 1931, titled "Anhalonium sp. undetermined.'' It is an illustration of a young 5-ribbed plant that commonly occurs in populations having plants with branches bearing 7-14 ribs. Rib number alone is an insufficient basis for establishing a separate taxon.

Lophophora williamsii var. pluricostata Croizat, Desert Plant Life 16: 9. 1944, was proposed because Croizat believed specimens of peyote having 13 ribs and forming clusters were worthy of separate taxonomic rank. He offered as a type an illus- tration by Schultes in Cact. Succ. Jour. 12: 178. fig. 1. 1940. As stated earlier, rib number is highly variable, depending on the age and health of the plant. More- over, clusters of heads are also common, especially if the plants have been injured.

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