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ferret

Acacia courtii propagation from cuttings

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That's a sweet looking root take good care of the little baby and don't let her get too waterlogged!

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I thought it was a bit of perlite at first haha. Good advice I will start letting things dry outa bit, they've def been kept moist

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So 3/4 cuttings have started rootin. The 4th is looking very dehydrated and I expect it will perish before rooting.

Cuttings taken from 4/5 year old potted plant recently topped up with some granular ferts, vigorous early spring growth

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exciting, will try this out!

Thanks Ferret :)

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looking good! 50% aint a terrible start

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Edited by ferret
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Lovely workup and progress results, thank you so much!

From memory you've run a few good experiments there, congratulations

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repotting after roughly 3 months reveals a decent looking root system!

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I started a second lot on 11/11 , only one had rooted after 40 days. They were moved out of the propagator after only 20 days.

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and, fingers crossed for a good seed set this year. 2 sweet ladies beginning to flower right now

post-251-0-16872100-1419422029_thumb.jpglove this tree

Edited by ferret
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Absolutely incredible ferret!

There needs to be a lot more people practicing propagation this way, especially with the more threatened species.

Keep up the study and keep sharing!

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Awesome work!

This tree seems to grow well in many climates, from temperate climates like Melbourne, to sub-tropical climates, though I haven't heard of anyone trying to grow it in a tropical climate.

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How are the pods coming along Ferret?

Initially I was going to post a 'no chance' for those summer flowers to produce seed, but I reckon you'd have pods the size of pins.

Without going too detailed and granted different location, soils and species, my experience over previous years with obtusifolia in my spot constantly yields nil seed from a summer flower, although this season must have been right as the tiny pods actually made it through summer, nothing like a spring harvest but there none the less.

Top work with your cuttings mate :)

I've got a heap of tubestock for ground plantings you may be interested in.

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yep you're spot on gerbil, the summer flowers did not set any seed. But two plants hung onto a few flower buds which opened a couple of weeks ago, looking promising!

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whats the deal with summer flowers not setting seed?

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Without rambling too much, I think it's primarily environmental with low humidity, high heat and drying winds over summer that cause pod burnoff or lack of set.

Slightly off the summer pod burnoff topic, small changes in environment can have fairly distinct outcomes, change aspect, shade cover, heat etc and it can be a whole new thing, i've got big older more shaded plants haven't had a hint of forming spikes ever, but turn the corner and younger plants have flowered and seeded for years.

Nutrition of both soil and tissue is an important factor as 'healthy' looking plants may be sitting on the edge of what they need, put forth some pressure on them and they won't perform, though a plant with everything it needs, even though it may look the same as the other, has the potential to laugh off the pressure and continue to do it's thing.

Nice flowers!

It's interesting how they do that, either hold inflorescence for months, or hold a 'dormant' pod, (embryonic diapause, did the mammals teach the mimosaceae or vice verse LOL) either way it works out very similarly, dormant pod starting to grow in March/April, the held inflorescence flowers, sets and grows at the time of the dormant awakening.

Keep an eye on yours for a late October / November harvest, you more than likely will get seed as they are beaning up nicely mate, nice little fatties.

I'm struggling to find my notes (isn't that frustrating) on flowering cycles and behaviours of obtusi around my area. I would have some better info for you if I can find that, it's not much, just more refined with observations and flowering cycles.

Nice to see ya 'round fezza, am impressed with your efforts all 'round.

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Summer flowering Acacia longissima, obtusifolia and implexa I have looked at generally have ripe fruit around 11months or so after flowers.

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It's doing my head in not being able to find the notes, I swear there were 2 different timed flower cycles noted over a few years with some erratic seasons which confused things, but the only photos I can find are early summer blooms and memories of 'don't need to take a photo will remember this' :BANGHEAD2: so I could be full of shit with no pods on summer flowers, I just can't remember how the bumper crops came through the heat as I recall watching bean set and growth, but memories of summers dropping all spikes. (getting better with notes these days haha)

Take toby's advice as a bit more rational :wink: It will be interesting to see what the late March flowers will do, if the spring warmth brings them on early for late spring early summer, or if it'll push to mid to late summer harvest.

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A little bit jealous, why can't I have success like this....anyway congrats on the good work

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These newly potted Courtii are doing rather well, but I am curious as to the drooping branches. It seems that this is part of Courtii's general morphology... but should I stake them up to avoid hitting the ground or raise the pots (unfortunately cannot get them into any ground for a little while)- thanks in advance :)

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So I've noticed as these guys get larger, that much of the older foliage has become mottled, dried and orange coloured (photos attached). Is this disease or merely too much midday sun ? thanks in advance :)

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Thank you so much Gerbil, These guys are growing well and have many new branches but there are still some leaves that loook like this, (I juts collect them as they drop off). When you say 'Phosphorous problems', do you mean deficiency or excess ? and how do I remedy it ?

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I always hesitate diagnosis 'cause nutrients are such a difficult field to truly understand and it seems a lot of the information books/sites/people put forth contradicts itself, and people just parrot shit which confuses things even more. Then you've got deficiency, toxicity, lockout, unavailability, interactions and a mix of all.

 

If they've been in the potting mix for a while and you haven't added any ferts and are managing watering appropriately (or your water isn't high in iron) i'd say Phosphorus deficiency.

 

I generally just feed blood and bone, sulphate of potash and occasionally trace elements or iron sulphate if specific symptoms appear. Just a handful / light dusting of Blood and bone on the surface, watered in and monitored response. I'll often have sacrificial plants and trial on them, my trials have been big potted obtusifolia and a small tubestock obtusi/acuminata, that can give me boundaries to play with and push. Each species can be different.

 

Sulphate of potash is not only good for potassium and sulphur, but will help with Nitrogen fixation by stimulating the nodules via sugar production (or something like that)

Sometimes I do a light charlie carp feed, but their potassium source is potassium chloride (cheap and nasty), you don't want to be introducing too much chloride, and the phosphorus would be soluble so too much could be a problem, but you can also overdo blood and bone.

 

You can get Phosphorus issues if your soil is too wet or cold (but again lots of other things too, also being too dry lol)

It's not a great time of year for Phosphorus as the cold tempratures inhibit the uptake. In cold climates, Pete Cundall (vege fella from tasmania) pretty much says Phosphorus applications from late april to late july is pretty useless as it won't really be uptaken or used.

 

These links give a bit of info re: feeding natives.

http://anpsa.org.au/APOL1/mar96-2.html

http://www.sesl.com.au/uploads/articles/Feeding_Native_Plants.pdf

 

welcome to the headfuck haha

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Thanks heaps for taking the time.

It does all seem a little overwhelming (but I've thought that about many things I now come to understand well :) ).

I purchased a soil Ph tester so will see what the conditions look like first. I also got some Osmocote for native gardens to give it a well balanced fertilisation. I've avoided fish oil on the Acacia's thus far as I was advised it is too high in nitrogen.

Also it is unseasonably warm here (and has been quite dry up until a week ago), but this 'oranging' of leaves did first occur when they were seedlings and we had a very hot spell during which I was overseas, so makes sense.

cheers

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